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Scar

what is this?

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co_setter
22 minutes ago, idcut said:

As I was looking at the photo, I was wondering if perhaps it could have been driven by a PTO from a tractor of some kind!

With the steel wheels, a good possibility of being  driven by belt off a pulley from a tractor. My grandfather had a belt driven saw for 1940's vintage Farmall tractors. Never saw it run, but expect it would have been spectacularly dangerous.

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Scar

There is a PTO attachment at the "front" of the equipment that runs a worm gear that spans the length on the bottom.  I didn't get a good picture of the mechanism that the gear operates but it appears to grasp, and perhaps turn, the vertical pipe that you see in the pictures.

 

I'm sure that the equipment was designed to be operated by a tractor via PTO whether gas or steam driven.  Clearly it was built prior to the frequent use of rubber for tires which places it perhaps as pre-1920's.  Seems like it could have been towed either via tractor or team with there being no obvious evidence of which (to my eyes).

 

Again, I'm convinced it is a drilling rig.  I think it must have come to rest in it's remote location because that is where the horse died.  😎

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vabirddog
55 minutes ago, co_setter said:

With the steel wheels, a good possibility of being  driven by belt off a pulley from a tractor. My grandfather had a belt driven saw for 1940's vintage Farmall tractors. Never saw it run, but expect it would have been spectacularly dangerous.

Here you go. We had a super M. Everybody called them cut off saw mostly. Great for cutting slab wood to kitchen or parlor stove size. 

Edit: this isnt our video or tractor  

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co_setter
6 minutes ago, vabirddog said:

Here you go. We had a super M. Everybody called them cut off saw mostly. Great for cutting slab wood to kitchen or parlor stove size. 

Edit: this isnt our video or tractor  

That's it.  Open pulleys and no shields on a 40+ hp saw.  What could go wrong?  😎  

 

Now back on topic.  Sorry for the hijack.

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Scar
39 minutes ago, co_setter said:

That's it.  Open pulleys and no shields on a 40+ hp saw.  What could go wrong?  😎  

 

Now back on topic.  Sorry for the hijack.

 

Not a problem.  That looks incredibly safe.  Not.

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Dave in Maine
40 minutes ago, Scar said:

 

Not a problem.  That looks incredibly safe.  Not.

Right up there with a stump grinder on the safety scale.

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idcut

I pose another theory different from the dead horse one. To use co_setters descriptive and accurate verbiage “spectacularly dangerous” my theory is ,it was left at its resting spot due to an injury to the operator.....at best an appendage torn off, at worse, death of the operator! 
 

Kind of glum, but early equipment was notorious for causing serious injury or death to inattentive or careless operators! 
 

My grandmother who was born in 1893 and grew up in N MN, told of a brother that was killed by a farm implement from getting caught in a belt or PTO and getting torn up. 

 

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vabirddog
4 hours ago, co_setter said:

That's it.  Open pulleys and no shields on a 40+ hp saw.  What could go wrong?  😎  

 

Now back on topic.  Sorry for the hijack.

Actually that one is missing the shield for the saw. Practically every piece of farm machinery is unpredictable and dangerous. Comes with the territory. 

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Remo
4 hours ago, co_setter said:

That's it.  Open pulleys and no shields on a 40+ hp saw.  What could go wrong?  😎  

 

Now back on topic.  Sorry for the hijack.

 

I still have a saw blade just like that. The rest of the apparatus went in the scrap iron pile years ago. My dad cut and sold oak fence posts in the 20s & 30s.

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VizslavsBird

Timbers look very small for a well drilling rig.  Looks similar to an old broom corn baler I have seen, my guess it's the frame of a hay baler.

 

Also I bet it was belt driven, not PTO.  Most PTO stuff has too much torque for wood framed equipment.  

 

 

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