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Tall Timbers reports a positive quail hatch in S E US monitored areas


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5 hours ago, mister grouse said:

https://talltimbers.org/quail-hatch-report/
 

 

Some areas 25% increase, some less, across the areas in GA, Fla, Carolinas where TT monitors the nests and hatch.

 

The hatch definitely seems to be going well; seems to have at least replicated the coveys from last year as we see them when feeding up or from random finds around the farm.  Hoping some of the late hatches can give us a net increase year over over year.

Here's a video from yesterday afternoon. Was walking around and my pup pointed into some dog fennel on a power line.  Turn up your volume and listen to this.....   Pretty sure this is what Dr. James Martin at UGA calls a "crèche."     😃

 

 

 

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It is wild when you bump into one of the large summer coveys that are a collection of several different broods! 40-50 birds together can be common. This was the second such covey I've found this summer. I was able to see the birds well in the first one, which I saw about a month ago. The tall cover in this second one for the most part just let me hear it, but obviously at very close proximity.  Provides lots of hope for down the road when these birds split into regular coveys in a few weeks.Most of the younger birds I see around aren't in these big groups, or crèches as I recently learned they can be called. 

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Ive been hearing birds whistling off and on this spring/early summer.  Saw my first covey last Sunday.  It feels promising more so this year locally.  Our habitat looks good all around and have a ton of new cuts that look promising to investigate.  

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1 hour ago, mccuha said:

Ive been hearing birds whistling off and on this spring/early summer.  Saw my first covey last Sunday.  It feels promising more so this year locally.  Our habitat looks good all around and have a ton of new cuts that look promising to investigate.  

 

Landowners, NGOs, and governmental agencies are really putting a lot of effort and resources into bringing back, and enhancing, quail in SC.  Tall Timbers has a full time guy there now and I've been very impressed with him on the recent Facebook Live programs on quail management that he has been part of.   Have you had a chance to reach out to him? Seems he's very open to helping landowners and quail enthusiasts around the state. 

 

 

Paul Grimes hired as full-time game bird biologist for the Carolina region

The Tall Timbers Board of Trustees approved a full-time biologist position in the Carolinas as part of the recently updated Strategic Plan. Mr. Paul Grimes was selected for this position and began working full-time on January 16, 2018.

Paul grew up on the Georgia/South Carolina line and lives with his wife Rita and daughter Kathleen (Kati-Jo) near Augusta, Georgia. He earned his BS and MS Degrees in Forest Resources from the University of Georgia (UGA) in 2008 and 2012, respectively.  His thesis research focused on northern bobwhite population response to habitat improvements associated with red-cockaded woodpecker restoration efforts. Paul is no newcomer to Tall Timbers having served as an intern in Central Florida as part of a bobwhite research project. Since graduating from UGA, Paul worked for seven years at Ft. Gordon Army Base and then for three years as the project leader for the Georgia Wildlife Resources Division’s Bobwhite Quail Initiative. With extensive education and field experience Paul has excellent technical skills, including GIS and mapping, and a strong practical knowledge of managing and monitoring bobwhite habitats and populations. Last but certainly not least, he is an avid quail and upland bird hunter and a proven bird dog trainer! 

We are excited to have Paul join the Game Bird Program team and look forward to the future expansion of wild bobwhite lands in the Carolinas as a result. Paul can be contacted by phone at 706-825-0451 or email at dpgrimes@talltimbers.org.

Paul%20Grimes_enews.jpg

 

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If you appreciate or are into private land management in the SE US, the new Private Lands Program quarterly newsletter from the Georgia Department of Natural Resources came out today. It's loaded and with all kinds of wildlife management tips on a month by month basis, info on fruiting plants for wildlife, and lots of other stuff, such as the "what, when, and hows" of fallow field management.  It's in PDF form; if any of you would like a copy the 17 page letter, let me know and I'll email it to you.

 

Here are their monthly tips for the September and October:

 

MANAGEMENT TIPS
We are trying a new calendar format that will provide some basic management timing information as well as hunting season dates. You will find the calendar at the end of this newsletter. Most of our management practices are not easy to just drop onto a calendar, so we will be providing more detailed information in this section, broken out by month.


September
• Get burning and firebreak contractors lined up, if needed.
• Finish herbicide treatments on hardwoods and invasives before leaf drop begins. Grasses should be sprayed before evening temperatures drop below 55 and growth slows. Evergreen plants such as privet can be sprayed year-round if the temperatures remain high enough for the herbicides to be active. Japanese climbing fern sets spores this month. To get ahead of it, make sure you treat it now. Make sure to read and follow your herbicide labels.
• You can begin to mow or chop hunting lanes, but be sure to leave plenty of cover for fledgling birds and winter escape cover.
• For those that are planning for the late dove season, plant a second round of millet.
• Late fall food plots can also be planted. Oats can be planted in September and October and can be mixed with other plants such as annual clover. We recommend getting your soil tested. Soils should be a neutral pH.


October
• Complete planning firebreaks and burn plans. Go ahead and establish new firebreaks early; then you will only need to refresh them before burning.
• Conduct prescribed burns for site prep.
• If there is sufficient moisture, begin planting longleaf. Planting containerized seedlings in the fall when moisture is available has shown to result in better survival than waiting until January, especially if you plan to spray for herbaceous release in the spring.
• Most plants and grasses have already begun to go dormant, so herbicide treatments may not be as effective this month. You should still be able to complete hack and squirt control. Evergreen plants such as privet can be sprayed year-round if the temperatures remain high enough for the herbicides to be active and there is rainfall. Make sure you read your labels. If you are treating climbing fern, it is best done before spore formation and before burning.
• If you have natural food sources in your duck impoundments, you can mow strips before flooding to provide better access. Planted foods cannot be manipulated unless you are harvesting an agricultural crop.
• Conduct predator surveys by setting up scent stations to determine the predator index on your property. Contact our biologists for information on conducting a survey.
• Conduct fall covey counts beginning mid-month through the second week of November.
o Need maps or datasheets? Ask your BQI Biologist. They can customize some for your property.
• Plant winter wheat and oats if moisture is available.
• Fertilize cool season food plots.
• You can begin disking your fallow areas after mid-month, but I prefer to wait until December or January, especially in areas that are lacking in winter cover. If you have areas that are prone to becoming wet later in the year, go ahead and disk later this month.

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11 hours ago, spring said:

 

Landowners, NGOs, and governmental agencies are really putting a lot of effort and resources into bringing back, and enhancing, quail in SC.  Tall Timbers has a full time guy there now and I've been very impressed with him on the recent Facebook Live programs on quail management that he has been part of.   Have you had a chance to reach out to him? Seems he's very open to helping landowners and quail enthusiasts around the state. 

 

 

Paul Grimes hired as full-time game bird biologist for the Carolina region

The Tall Timbers Board of Trustees approved a full-time biologist position in the Carolinas as part of the recently updated Strategic Plan. Mr. Paul Grimes was selected for this position and began working full-time on January 16, 2018.

Paul grew up on the Georgia/South Carolina line and lives with his wife Rita and daughter Kathleen (Kati-Jo) near Augusta, Georgia. He earned his BS and MS Degrees in Forest Resources from the University of Georgia (UGA) in 2008 and 2012, respectively.  His thesis research focused on northern bobwhite population response to habitat improvements associated with red-cockaded woodpecker restoration efforts. Paul is no newcomer to Tall Timbers having served as an intern in Central Florida as part of a bobwhite research project. Since graduating from UGA, Paul worked for seven years at Ft. Gordon Army Base and then for three years as the project leader for the Georgia Wildlife Resources Division’s Bobwhite Quail Initiative. With extensive education and field experience Paul has excellent technical skills, including GIS and mapping, and a strong practical knowledge of managing and monitoring bobwhite habitats and populations. Last but certainly not least, he is an avid quail and upland bird hunter and a proven bird dog trainer! 

We are excited to have Paul join the Game Bird Program team and look forward to the future expansion of wild bobwhite lands in the Carolinas as a result. Paul can be contacted by phone at 706-825-0451 or email at dpgrimes@talltimbers.org.

Paul%20Grimes_enews.jpg

 

I think I saw his name on the sc bobwhite initiative site   I just volunteered to help with doing whistle and covey counts.  This is a part of the department of natural resources in sc.  they are putting a lot more efforts towards trying to reverse the quail decline.  I’m very excited about this upcoming Season and what I’m seeing.  Hopefully a lot more states will follow suit and help to somewhat bring them back.  

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