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Eating right on the road

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For those that drive thousnds of miles to hunt and have a specific diet,   How do you stick with the diet on the road for several days

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Bluegill68

For the most part I stay on my diet I can and have on occasion diverted for a special treat. By and large though I keep it in the forefront of the sacrifices I make through training the entire year.

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Don Steese

If you're traveling in an RV you can easily maintain the same diet you eat at home. 

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Birdcountry70

I thought this was going to be a thread about salvaging roadkill. 😝

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Greg Hartman
1 hour ago, Don Steese said:

If you're traveling in an RV you can easily maintain the same diet you eat at home. 


This.  Our RV is basically a second home.  We don’t really live any different “on the road” than we do at home.

 

People day things like “How was your vacation.”  We don’t see it that way - just daily living with a changing view out the windows of our home.

 

 

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blanked

So when your travelingwith the goal to cover maximum miles a day to get to your location you pull over and cook to eat 

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Huntschool

We dont have an RV so we either go to restaurants or cook off the tail gate.  Our trips have been shorter in duration and on ground travel due to personal medical conditions but we still manage a trail lunch when fishing or at a clays shoot.  I am all in for someone to cook and clean up for us so restaurants are good for evening meals since we are likely to be staying at motels or close to town cabins.  Breakfast is always at least a biscuit or something of that order (sometimes more) with coffee of course. 

 

Years ago when we traveled a lot on vacations and to some of the then big black powder, buckskin gatherings Marilyn had a "kitchen" box in the back of the Old Land Cruiser and could have a meal out in short order.  Those were the days. 

 

Neither of us is really on any kind of "must do" diet so we are pretty free to eat what we like.  Aint we lucky...... 

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Greg Hartman
12 minutes ago, blanked said:

So when your travelingwith the goal to cover maximum miles a day to get to your location you pull over and cook to eat 


Of course not.  I try hard not to have a goal of covering maximum miles per day.  That would be horrible, plus dangerous when driving a 30,000 pound rig towing a truck.  Also, we don’t “cook” every meal at home or anywhere.  Toast for breakfast.  Salad or sandwiches for lunch.  Then usually real cooked food for dinner after we are stopped for the night.

 

We don’t have special diets, so maybe that makes it easy for us.

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Cooter Brown

It's a vacation.  The liquid diet should prevail.

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A516

 It is so good to know the self-restraint that traveling members of this forum have with food while out to partake in nature.  It sounds like they totally refrain from the loaded, two pound, great smelling greasy breakfast burrito when gassing up at a truck stop.  They pay no attention to the glazed, creme filled donuts (with two scoops of ice cream on top) in the convenient stores.  Never bat an eye at the billboards advertising the two-quart milkshake, bucket of fries and the triple cheeseburger loaded with three patties of beef, bacon, a slice of ham, four cheeses, etc. special at the next exit hamburger joint.  Never stop at the BBQ  restaurants with the two pound baked potatoes covered in a pound of your favorite BBQ meat and smothered in an inch of cheese (of course with a whole stick of butter in the potato).

 

LADIES AND GENTLEMEN OF THIS FORUM I SALUTE YOU (and have great and safe travels).

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apachecadillac
2 hours ago, Birdcountry70 said:

I thought this was going to be a thread about salvaging roadkill. 😝

 

You don't eat roadkill right on the road.  You wrap it in foil and let it cook on the engine manifold for a couple of hundred miles.

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Mike da Carpenter

The boys and I are going close to 500 miles away the next few days to take advantage of the pink salmon run.  My wife has cooked us a dozen breakfast burritos (sausage, bacon, eggs) then wrapped and froze.  She also whipped up some blueberry muffins and froze those too.  We have fresh deer loin (Supplies by the boys last weekend) for the grill one night with instant mashed potatoes and a salad.  Then there is “garlic” sausage night on the grill and also some smoked pork that was left over from the 4th of July that we froze.  
 

Everything is put into a prechilled Yeti “type” cooler (I won’t drop the coin on one of those, but I picked up some dirt cheap Rtic coolers when they had to liquidate because of the lawsuit from Yeti).  Once the frozen food is in there, I fill the voids with frozen water bottles.   No problem keeping stuff frozen solid for 5 days as long as you don’t open the cooler to see what’s in there a few times a day.   In the mornings, I always let the boys decide what they want for dinner and I take it out to thaw while we go hunting or fishing.  
 

Breakfast meals are usually heated up in a microwave.  
 

Lunches are whatever we can scrounge out of the goody bag my wife packs us, or we splurge and get Subway if there is one around (it is vacation after all).

 

We typically have way more food then we can handle, and invite people over that are out doing the same things as us, or we come home with plenty to keep us going.  Best part of it all is it’s pretty much the same stuff we eat at home all the time and our bodies adjust easily because there is very little if any change to our diets.

 

When we used to stay in a motel out in SD while bird hunting, I always carried a 12” x12” electric skillet.  Would always cook hash browns, eggs & bacon for breakfast and would grill Samiches in the evenings.  I would even premake some meals we always enjoy eating, freeze transport as mentioned above and heated up in the skillet.  That 12” skillet has cook a boatload of meals.  We would have Lasagna, spaghetti, sausage/peppers/tomatoes/onions and chicken fried rice were a few of our favorites.

 

Of course the boys are kids and get as many sweets and treats that they see along the way (within reason).  You’re only young once and can’t burn it off as easy when older, so we cut some slack when traveling.

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tut

I almost always in up grabbing something at a fast food joint when travelling on a long road trip.  However once on site, its pretty easy.  Make lots of stuff in advance and most is game related.  Venison Chili, Venison Lasagna, Venison tenderloin, Wild turkey fajitas.  In fact I'll say with the exception of eating out at a local joint once just to get a bit of local flavor everything is pretty much the norm.  I probably in some ways eat better on a trip as I love wild game and my wife doesn't.  Hence it gives me a chance to really eat well and eat healthy.  Lunch times on the road it depends on where I'm at.  Pre-Covid we would find a few local places for lunch and totally avoid chains.  This year I can see more of a situation where I will either pack a lunch or head back to the cabin and eat something there and let the dog have a few hours to recharge the batteries.   Generally whatever cabin I am staying at is going to be within 30 or 40 minutes of the places to hunt. 

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CptSydor

My partner is vegan, so along with the dogs, it's a big factor in why we vacation extensively with a travel trailer (mostly for mountain biking). Finding good food along the road, especially for her is challenging, but with the kitchen, we can always whip up a meal we'll both enjoy.

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WI Outdoor Nut

I will state I travel for work (non-covid years) somewhere between 50-100 days a year depending on projects, and eat out 100% of the time for all my meals.  For hunting, which I average around 20 or so days a year, local establishments are sometimes not too close, and I don't like losing hunting time.  When on the road, a light breakfast, usually at the hotel, of a yogurt, fruit, and some OJ.  Lunch, usually a sub or big chicken salad.  Dinner, good protein of steak or salmon, with greens of some sort. 

 

When hunting, I have moved to a little 12 v cooker called the Lunchbox cooker.  I started uses this when I am on weeklong fishing trips (usually fish 10 or so hours a day) and wanted something different than cold sandwiches all the time.  It isn't a fast cooker, but will make a hotdog or a precooked brat steaming hot in about 25 minutes.  I simply wrap the protein in aluminum foil and plug in to your cigarette lighter.  I think it draws something like 4 amps, so not a real big concern.  When grouse hunting, I find a cover that takes about a 1/2 hour to hunt, and you have pipping hot food when you come back.  Works great for bun foods, but also have warmed up pulled pork, fajitas, soups and (a little messy).  For those of us who are on the road for what ever reason, I think it is a great alternative that is simple with just a little planning. 

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