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watermen

Chinkapin

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watermen

Fellow sent me these.  Gonna plant them carefully.

chinkapin.jpg

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Cooter Brown

Good luck!

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Huntschool

You should be OK but it (Quercus muehlenbergii needs a Ph of least then 6.5.  They are great trees (White Oak Family) and can produce huge quantity of mast.  

 

I would suggest you start them in containers and then move them to your field areas.  They are native to MO

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Lurch
7 hours ago, Huntschool said:

 They are great trees (White Oak Family) and can produce huge quantity of mast.  

 

Thanks, I was thinking "are those some kind of special fungi or something? Look like hat-less acorns to me. Never heard of chinkapin.

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ScottGrush

We tried some in NE lower Michigan, so far about 2/3 of them have survived.  We bought them from a nursery in the U.P. where they had survived at least two winters. 

I'm only about 6 miles from lake Huron and that big water keeps us "moderately" warm in the winter. I also have a hackberry tree in my side yard that is going gangbusters. Both species are pushing their northern limits here but maybe the recent weather patterns (dare I say climate change?) are letting these warmer climate species survive this far north. 

Good luck with your project. Our chinkapins are only about 5' tall after being in the ground since 2016. 

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Remo

Interesting acorns. I have tried planting sprouted acorns both in pots and directly in the ground where I wanted them to grow. It was a surprise how deep the tap root will go down in the first year of growth. Transplanting will cost the tree extra time to regrow the lost roots but of course you can give it extra care if in pots. They need protection when small as everything likes to eat oak seedings.

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watermen

https://ozarkchinquapinmembership.org/about-the-tree/

Should have put this in with the first post.  I talked the environmental science teacher into starting them in pots in his classroom.  Maybe some will make it.  According to my grandfather they were a favorite of quail and people usually left them at the edge of fields.

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idcut

Good luck with the plantings! I was hunting with a friend and his dad some years back and I was pointing out some of the different species of trees we have in N ID. He asked if I had ever heard of the chinkapin tree and that they were abundant where he grew up in Arkansas. I'd never heard of them prior to his mention of them. He thought they were related to the chestnut tree but it looks like they are not.

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Huntschool
2 hours ago, watermen said:

https://ozarkchinquapinmembership.org/about-the-tree/

Should have put this in with the first post.  I talked the environmental science teacher into starting them in pots in his classroom.  Maybe some will make it.  According to my grandfather they were a favorite of quail and people usually left them at the edge of fields.

 

As I assume you found out from above post......

Castenea , sp is Not the oak acorns you have in your hand in the pic.  Castenea is the Chestnut family, not the Quercus (oak) family.  Start those acorns in at leasy 4" or larger pots as that will allow better root development for transplant.  Most nursery's will let seedlings go 2-3 years in container before transplanting to outside beds.

 

Just an FYI 

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watermen

I was told I was given the dwarf acorn.    Our yearly state AG forestry contest has yet to turn up a new specimen of castanea.  I do not know much about chestnuts being under 60.  I believe this is as close as I am going to get for awhile to putting the genetics and mast back in the  quail woods.   These are supposed to fruit early and grow in brushy clusters. 

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idcut

So my friend's dad was correct, that the chinkapin is in the chestnut family.

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Allen McCallie

I believe the Chinquapin oak is a different tree than the Chinquapin chestnut....

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1971snipe

My father in law was born in Chinquapin, San Augustine County in East Texas.  (Not that anyone on here cares.  But, it's not often that I get to talk about Chinquapin.) 

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Allen McCallie

I love it when historical names resonate with meaning. My guess would be that in this case Chinqupin meant the Chinqupin subspecies of the Chestnut, which I have learned through my reading today was an extraordinarily important tree in the middle of the country until the chestnut blight wiped it out in the 1960s.

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Huntschool
7 hours ago, idcut said:

So my friend's dad was correct, that the chinkapin is in the chestnut family.

 

NO, not the oak that was shown in the OP's original picture.  Quercus family

 

10 hours ago, watermen said:

I was told I was given the dwarf acorn.    Our yearly state AG forestry contest has yet to turn up a new specimen of castanea.  I do not know much about chestnuts being under 60.  I believe this is as close as I am going to get for awhile to putting the genetics and mast back in the  quail woods.   These are supposed to fruit early and grow in brushy clusters. 

 

Yes, and they are actually native to MO.

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