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Place board and whoa


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22 hours ago, Rick Hall said:

 

Not remotely as easy as not using it at all.  (Suggests a guy whose only remaining training paraphernalia are a short slip lead, whistle, bumpers and birds.)

 

Rick, I fairly certain your not a place board guy. You have made that very clear.

Probable should not bring up the subject of Bucket training.

 

Hal

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5 hours ago, Hal Standish said:

 

Rick, I fairly certain your not a place board guy. You have made that very clear.

Probable should not bring up the subject of Bucket training.

 

Hal

 

I've a long acquaintance with place board and place board-like training, harking back to when Jerome Robinson was Sports Afield's gun dog columnist and thought the boxes Omar Driskel used in steadying retrievers the greatest innovation since the heeling stick (another counterproductive crutch).  And of what I've seen, Pat Nolan's Ponderosa Kennels made the most extensive use of place board training, of which there at least used to be tons of clips on the net.  Found Pat's stuff interesting, just not expedient.

 

As for bucket training, there's nothing that can touch a bucket or cone to teach a pup to look for buckets or cones, but a number of better ways to teach it to take mental pictures.

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1 hour ago, Rick Hall said:

 

 

 

As for bucket training, there's nothing that can touch a bucket or cone to teach a pup to look for buckets or cones, but a number of better ways to teach it to take mental pictures.

Just so we are on the same page The Bucket drill i refer to has nothing to do with marking or pile I.D.

It is an upland drill used by spanielers to strengthen and improve their dogs quartering skills and running pattern.

my responses on the thread are usually about upland training flushing dogs with occasional comments about pointing breeds or non slip retrieving behaviors.

 

Omar great guy had a nice Lunch with him some 25-28 yrs ago. He was judging I was gunning the seasoned and finished. This was back when actual flyers Ducks and pheasants were shot for the dogs in the test.

 

Hal

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My bad.  Never heard of spaniel quartering bucket drills.  Never had interest in teaching a flusher to quarter: just teach them to "hunt close" and let them work the cover at hand as it suggests. 

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Rockford Setters

I use the place board inside when I feed my pup. I make her stay on the board until I release her to go and eat from her bowl.  She has learned to run to it, get on it and stay until she is released.  When I take it outside she knows to stay until released.  

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On 12/12/2020 at 6:21 AM, Rick Hall said:

 

Not remotely as easy as not using it at all.  (Suggests a guy whose only remaining training paraphernalia are a short slip lead, whistle, bumpers and birds.)

In my experience the weaning process is just as easy as going from a lead to no lead.    I have worked both ways.   Not a big deal either way.   

 

Training is training and doing the process the "right way" with the tools one wants to use isn't right or wrong but just different.   Nothing will replace the effort and time needed to get a dog to the desired level.  Speed and quickness in training would not always be in the dogs best interest.  

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2 hours ago, SpringerDude said:

In my experience the weaning process is just as easy as going from a lead to no lead.    I have worked both ways.   Not a big deal either way.   

 

Training is training and doing the process the "right way" with the tools one wants to use isn't right or wrong but just different.   Nothing will replace the effort and time needed to get a dog to the desired level.  Speed and quickness in training would not always be in the dogs best interest.  

 

Drive on!

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Craig Doherty

Added them to the repertoire last summer -- not a silver bullet but turned out to be a useful tool in the process of whoa breaking a bunch of young dogs without a ton of pressure.

 

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20 hours ago, Craig Doherty said:

Added them to the repertoire last summer -- not a silver bullet but turned out to be a useful tool in the process of whoa breaking a bunch of young dogs without a ton of pressure.

 

98F2E715-F938-4049-B1DF-30B17BE28664.thumb.jpeg.470cd59aec885b2a2d6d1f0b512f039f.jpeg

 

Craig, right-on! Providing clarity to the dog of what your intentions are is always a positive. Good Job!

 

Hal

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Mike da Carpenter

I use a place “board” once the puppy learns the command “come”.  For a place board, I use their bed, floor mat or an actual place board I built 20+ years ago out of MDO plywood (20”x36”).

 

My wife has always enjoyed taking the dog for a walk in the evenings and since our first one together I noticed how much they get in the way when she is getting her shoes and coat on.  I was worried she would be knocked down the stairs, so I started with that lab of teaching the command “Place” when put on the door mat.  Didn’t really take them long to learn and then I started doing the same thing with the next lab and the GSP.  
 

My wife loves being able to get ready for their walk without worrying about getting knocked down and the dogs quickly learned that when it is time, they go to their “place” or they don’t get to go.

 

I say start them young and make it fun.  Animal crackers are my treat of choice to help get the point across.

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On 12/11/2020 at 10:13 PM, SpringerDude said:

I am using placeboards to work with a Setter pup.   We are moving along nicely.   He will stay steady on the board until sent for a retrieve.   come back to the board to deliver.  Still a puppy so plays around some instead of coming straight back.  Ok with me for now.     

 

Off the board, he can be running and slams to a stop when I throw the bumper.   Weaning off the board was no issue.   

9 months old.   not putting a lot of pressure but he does need some to get his attention at times.   Well... he is a puppy ....    

I can get my puppy to go to the board when I give the place command. How do you reinforce staying on the board until a release command is given? If I back away and she steps off what is the best way to correct? Thanks!

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Mike da Carpenter
31 minutes ago, boltonguy said:

I can get my puppy to go to the board when I give the place command. How do you reinforce staying on the board until a release command is given? If I back away and she steps off what is the best way to correct? Thanks!


To me, it is just like teaching “Whoa” and to me “place” is the precursor to teaching the dog “Whoa”.  “Place” means to go where I point and stay there.  “Whoa” means grow roots and don’t move a muscle. If they come off, pick them up and place back on the “board” and give the command again.  Never get frustrated, and learn to read when the dog just isn’t going to do it (time to quit instructing on both occasions).  
 

Like I said earlier, Animal Crackers get used a LOT.  They quickly learn to associate doing what is asked to receiving a treat.  Weaning them off down the road isn't to hard.  This GSP is 3+ and still gets crackers. It’s the simple pleasures in life that make everyone happy.

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4 hours ago, boltonguy said:

I can get my puppy to go to the board when I give the place command. How do you reinforce staying on the board until a release command is given? If I back away and she steps off what is the best way to correct? Thanks!

 

The great thing about Place training is that either Positive reinforcement cookies treats  or  Negative reinforcement ecollar healing stick are both effective, which ever the trainer feels the most confident to use. I have done it both ways with great results. For those that need it place training a great way to introduce dog to the ecollar

 

3 hours ago, Mike da Carpenter said:


To me, it is just like teaching “Whoa” and to me “place” is the precursor to teaching the dog “Whoa”.  “Place” means to go where I point and stay there.  “Whoa” means grow roots and don’t move a muscle. If they come off, pick them up and place back on the “board” and give the command again.  Never get frustrated, and learn to read when the dog just isn’t going to do it (time to quit instructing on both occasions).  
 

Like I said earlier, Animal Crackers get used a LOT.  They quickly learn to associate doing what is asked to receiving a treat.  Weaning them off down the road isn't to hard.  This GSP is 3+ and still gets crackers. It’s the simple pleasures in life that make everyone happy.

 

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On 12/17/2020 at 7:16 AM, boltonguy said:

I can get my puppy to go to the board when I give the place command. How do you reinforce staying on the board until a release command is given? If I back away and she steps off what is the best way to correct? Thanks!

If she comes off the board then you moved too far.  stay closer until she knows to stay there.   I held my dogs collar until he would not pull, then I stood next to him to grab him if he tried to leave early, then I gradually moved away as long as he stayed until sent.   I was using this method with a retrieve being the reward.   3-4 retrieves in the morning and evening and it didn't take long to get the results I was looking for.   

 

I don't tell him place, I just call him "here" and he comes and get on board.  But now, if I have a bumper, he will run to the boards and wait to get a retrieve.   I just shape the behavior I want and try to leave the commands out until the dog is doing what I want.    So far it has worked for me. 

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