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Softer/ Quieter Calls?


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 I learned how to use my double reed Zink ATM Mallard call fairly well in the last two years.  Seems like it only sounds right when blown full blast and it's pretty damn loud. Are there types of calls that are a bit softer for when ducks are in close or so that you don't ring off the trees louder than hell? 

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Clueless1

I'm very new to the whole thing but was told the wood calls are generally not as loud.  Hope someone can verify because I have the same problem. 

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34 minutes ago, Clueless1 said:

I'm very new to the whole thing but was told the wood calls are generally not as loud.  Hope someone can verify because I have the same problem. 

 

 I'm also pretty new to calling.  I've had good luck with my Zink call at getting distant birds attention, just feel like it's gotta be unnatural when they get close. 

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Brdhntr47

Try to find a Glynn Scobey call. I used his wood goose and duck calls for years and had great success with them all over the country. Even used them a couple times in Argentina. Glynn died a number of years ago and his calls are very collectible. Best bet would be to look on EBay.

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I primarily use a single reed call. They can all be called softer. It just takes practice at it. A double reed for me is way easier to call soft. Once the birds are working.  If I feel the need to call I’ll just quack at them softly but I tend to do more soft feeding chatter.  I also use my 7 in 1 call and make that nasally drake call.   Just keep fooling with it.  Doing a lot of long cadences to me is not necessary when they are close. Just keep it simple. 

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Windrider

Cup your hand over the call you are used to blowing/aim the bell down

or

buy an all wood “timber” call

or

If a single reed put a new reed in it, start with a longer reed and tune it to the sound you want.*

 

* = buy several reeds and corks.  It will take some practice.  In general the longer the reed the lower and raspier the tone but the harder it is to blow. The shorter the reed the higher the pitch and the easier to blow.  When you trim you will need a razor blade.  We are talking a hair or two breadth at a time.  You can also dog ear a little more or a little less.

 

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Treerooster
1 hour ago, Windrider said:

Cup your hand over the call you are used to blowing/aim the bell down

or

 

This.

 

Also I assume you are using your diagram to control the air into the call? Don't blow a duck call like you would blow out a candle. Use your diagram like you say humpf. Using your diagram gives you more control over the amount of air into the call and better control on the volume.

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mister grouse

I hunt a good bit in what I call small water.  I use the same call as I do for open water or big timber, but am careful to deflect the call straight away from the birds.  I have also listened  to many many birds that are on the water and in the air calling while I ma scouting, and would note that some hens are just loud as hell.  Loud doesn't matter If you are calling at the right times and with the right  calls (and sometimes less is more in duck calling) 

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Rick Hall

Any call with a little 1/4" bore will be inherently quieter than what you're probably using.  (Most seem to have "timber" in their name, which is a bit ironic, since an awful lot of experienced folks run inherently loud calls in the woods.)  Echo and RNT offer well proven 1/4" bored "Timbers", and I'd suggest going with a single reed, as you should find those small-bored calls make it relatively easy to make the transition to single reeds - which you should find inherently more versatile than doubles. 

 

And once you've the hang of single reed calling, you'll find it easier to run other, inherently louder, calls quietly.

 

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Call only at their tails. If they are coming, best thing you can do is shut up. If you must call, just a quack. 

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1 hour ago, Jalinkly said:

Call only at their tails. If they are coming, best thing you can do is shut up. If you must call, just a quack. 

 

What? That's nutso. You have to be ringing out hail calls when you can't even see birds, and then just rolling feed call them incessantly or else you will not ever kill any ducks. 

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Duck Commander "Brown Sugar" call.   Nice cheap good "soft" sounding call.  Has sort of a baffle to quiet it down.  And of course like everything else in this world, once established as a good value, its discontinued.  Can't even find them on eBay.

 

Haydell's DR-85 blown into a wool glomitt is pretty soft.   

 

Add a Rich-N-Tone QuackHead Goozilla goose call and a Duck Commander Wood Duck Call and that's my line up.  I have couple other more expensive calls but I just use these four.  I only hunt small beaver ponds. 

 

I really just call for fun between volleys of pass shooting.  I can probably count on my hands the number of times my calling actually seemed to turn ducks around.  Geese respond a bit better, especially if you knock down one of pair and the other comes back a bit later to look for it. 

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13 hours ago, Rick Hall said:

Any call with a little 1/4" bore will be inherently quieter than what you're probably using.  (Most seem to have "timber" in their name, which is a bit ironic, since an awful lot of experienced folks run inherently loud calls in the woods.)  Echo and RNT offer well proven 1/4" bored "Timbers", and I'd suggest going with a single reed, as you should find those small-bored calls make it relatively easy to make the transition to single reeds - which you should find inherently more versatile than doubles. 

 

And once you've the hang of single reed calling, you'll find it easier to run other, inherently louder, calls quietly.

 

 

Rick saved me the typing effort. I'm old-school and use a wood single reed call the majority of the time. IME a single reed is more versatile although that might just be a result of more experience with them. 

 

If you're looking for options to consider a long time waterfowl hunting buddy favors this call...

 

M-295 Close In Duck Call

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Rick Hall
9 hours ago, s.davis said:

 

What? That's nutso. You have to be ringing out hail calls when you can't even see birds, and then just rolling feed call them incessantly or else you will not ever kill any ducks. 

 

Sometimes good calling is not calling, sometimes good calling is aggressive and in their faces all the way to guns.  Fellow who only calls to the oft parroted "tips and tails" is going to leave a lot of what could have been shooting ops in the marsh.

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