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Lebanon Bologna


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Thoughts of good eating all around. I have found sweet Lebanon Bologna in the closest Hannaford. When I lived in Pennsy we made our own Scrapple or bought it from Lester Moyer, had a small one man butcher shop in Mt. Pleasant Mills. The store stuff that's to be had sporadically in same store mentioned already, out of Wisconsin just doesn't cut it. OK, but quite bland. Taylor Ham is another breakfast staple from down that way that is in short supply in these parts. I found some in Augusta but that's a long way just for breakfast meat. Now that all this on my mind I'll round up some Lebanon Bologna and the Taylor Ham this week-end and have breakfast three times a day next week. 

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People drive up from Boston for the charcuterie from the Amish guy in Unity.  Great story - he was a chef in one of those $600 a plate restaurants in Chicago and burned out.  One day he'd had enough a

About a year ago one of the local HyVee grocery stores here in Mn. started to carry it, much to my surprise. Both regular and sweet I prefer sweet. Last month I took a pound of thin sliced for sandwic

The Pennsylvania I grew up in, knew and loved is dead, buried under suburban sprawl.  The fine, industrial salt-of-the-earth cities like Easton, Bethlehem, Allentown, Reading have been turned into som

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7 hours ago, Dave in Maine said:

The Pennsylvania I grew up in, knew and loved is dead, buried under suburban sprawl.  The fine, industrial salt-of-the-earth cities like Easton, Bethlehem, Allentown, Reading have been turned into something approximating Bedford-Stuyvesant 1985, the South Bronx 1980, and Newark and Camden, NJ in any year.  Their neighborhoods are now marked by ongoing low-level gang warfare between the Crips, Bloods, Latin Kings, all exports from the big cities sent out by millennials gentrifying and Disneyfying them.  There are even some homegrown gangs, like the "Money Rules Everything" gang in and around Bethlehem.  One of their associates screwed them, or screwed up a drug deal, the other year.  So they burned him alive over it.  https://www.mcall.com/news/breaking/mc-nws-mre-bethlehem-homicide-tyrell-holmes-arrest-20190912-u2snfdjsobdwldux7rqwtshxc4-story.html 

 

Sadly, so true pf the cities here.  There is still some nice country left in PA, however.

 

3-14-20 - Looking out from the mountain

 

As far as Lepp-nen Bah-loniahy is concerned, I have one word for you - Kuntzlers".  It's a staple in this household.

 

BTW, the Kutztown location of Deitrich's is pronounced Khuutztahn - not Cuts-town.  In PA Dutch, to "cutz" is to vomit.  It's not vomit-town.

 

Likewise, Krumsville is not pronounced Crumbs-ville.  It is pronounced Khruuumswill.

 

If you're gonna eat PA Dutch food, learn to talk proper voncet.   🙂

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8 hours ago, Dave in Maine said:

Says this guy raised in Pennsylvania on Dutchie cuisine, "it's a Pennsylvania thing.  Because it's good, it's spread slowly across the northeast."  I can get Seltzers here in Maine, and I can get scrapple, too.  Just had the last of a pound of it with my eggs.

 


 


After hearing of scrapple all of my life I was visiting with in-laws and we had breakfast at a diner that served scrapple. Wanting to scratch that off my list I ordered some. Not to rain on anybody’s parade but that stuff made made head cheese aka souse that I was raised with taste like prime rib. If I was a contestant on survivor maybe by week 3  I’d try it again but whew. My BIL described the ingredients as once the bologna guys are through the scraps from that  go to the hot dog line . The remains from that go to the potted meat line and then the scraps from that are then made into scrapple.

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The things we take for granted. Seltzer's Double Smoked, couple slices of pepper jack w/ Duke's mayo on twelve grain bread is a jobsite lunch staple for me. 

 

Weaver's of Wellsville  is local to me. Good sweet bologna and lots of other tasty meat goodies. Worth checking out if you get back to the area. 

 

 

 

10 hours ago, Cold Iron said:

@Crazy Setter  @Marc Ret used to make it growing up if I recall correctly. 

 

 

 

I'm amused that you would remember that, Mike. Close enough to being a kid as I was in my twenties. Still have the recipe committed to memory for when I build my smokehouse.😉

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We have numerous old time butchers in the Lancaster, Lebanon, Berks County areas.

Love the smell of the smoke lingering in them.

As they say Scrapple contains everything but the squeal.

You guys in Maine have Amish Charcuterie in Unity.

A fine place for meats, I always try to get there when in the area.

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Dave in Maine
9 hours ago, jeff88 said:

...and eloquent too!  That PA upbringing at work.

 

PS:  I love Maine too, only a little experience went a long way.  If I retire next spring then a fall trip may include ME and PA hunting in one swell foop.   

The English department at my old high school has at least one Pulitzer credited to its alumni.  (Not me.)

Another of those small-town Pennsylvania things, formerly taken for granted:  Schools that actually taught, effectively.   What a concept.

 

On the Taylor Ham front, there's an outfit in Jersey that ships it, and also Habersett's scrapple  https://jerseyporkroll.com/

 

Another thing, mentioned in passing upthread, is "double-smoked".  If you can get some double-smoked bacon, you will know Nirvana.

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I grew up in Southern Ontario in Kitchener (formerly Little Berlin) know for its German and Austrian clubs and annual Octoberfest...the last UJ gathering at my place the boys brought scrapple and pork roll...and fried pork roll at the Catskills for breakfast was missed this year 😞

 

Having been exposed to lots of German cuisine my favorites were always local farm made Octoberfest sausage and what was called Summer Sausage (longer aged was my favorite as it was drier and flavor more pronounced) at the outdoor farmers market...miss those delicacies 😞

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Dave in Maine
1 minute ago, grouse28 said:

We have numerous old time butchers in the Lancaster, Lebanon, Berks County areas.

Love the smell of the smoke lingering in them.

As they say Scrapple contains everything but the squeal.

You guys in Maine have Amish Charcuterie in Unity.

A fine place for meats, I always try to get there when in the area.

People drive up from Boston for the charcuterie from the Amish guy in Unity.  Great story - he was a chef in one of those $600 a plate restaurants in Chicago and burned out.  One day he'd had enough and told his family "that's it.  We're moving to Maine."

So they moved to Maine and he started doing charcuterie.  After a while the local Amish started coming to him not only for products, but also to have him process their animals.

After a while of dealing with the Amish he found their lifestyle and principles appealing.  Resonated with something inside him.  One day he told his family "Family, we're joining the Amish."

So they joined the Amish.  And he went over to doing all his butcher work without electricity.  Gas and ice.  Kerosene lanterns.  His products continued to improve.

One day, the local health inspector heard about what he was doing, visited the shop and said "you can't do this without electricity!"  And shut him down.

This was unpopular with the locals and the more-distant consumers.  The Bangor paper picked it up.

The governor (love Maine - politicians and people are close) heard about it and went on something of a rampage.  He was good at rampages.  Many people loved him for that, and others hated him.

A week or so later, a different health officer stopped in, inspected and found everything OK.  And our butcher went back to work, gas, ice and kerosene and Amish-raised livestock.

Somewhere along the line, the Boston paper picked up on the story, I guess after some of their foodies sang praises.  (The Boston paper didn't like that governor.)

And people drove up from Boston and elsewhere to buy his stuff, which he prices reasonably so regular people can buy and consume them, too.

 

A lot of those Dutch Country places are like that.

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My mom would slice it thin and fry then add ketchup at the end and serve it on white bread. She called them Mexican hat sandwiches. This was in the late 60's in Binghamton. I still make them once in a while pretty good eats . Just to put it in perspective, I never saw a taco till we moved to St Louis in 72

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10 hours ago, jeff88 said:

Living here in TX, have never noticed it anywhere. 

I get Lebanon at Kroger. They occassionally have scrapple and butterkase as well. I often have to mispronounce butterkase so they know what I want, though. I originally typed "Kroger's" instead of Kroger. I think that's something a lot of PA transplants do; assign grocery stores a possessive article. 

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3 hours ago, Greg Hartman said:

 

Sadly, so true pf the cities here.  There is still some nice country left in PA, however.

 

3-14-20 - Looking out from the mountain

 

As far as Lepp-nen Bah-loniahy is concerned, I have one word for you - Kuntzlers".  It's a staple in this household.

 

  

Haha! We just always said lebnin, didn't bother with the pah-lOney part. Balogne was the stuff that came in rings that you ate sliced up with mustard on Christmas Eve and New Years Eve. Also... those little landjager dry sausages can't be beat. 

 

Lehigh Valley, gone but not forgotten. 

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9 hours ago, Crazy Setter said:

 

 

Try wrapping a paper thin slice around spiced pickled asparagus!!! One of my favorites. 

 

Olaf

I like to wrap asparagus with prosciutto and grill them   

 

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3 hours ago, Marc Ret said:

The things we take for granted. Seltzer's Double Smoked, couple slices of pepper jack w/ Duke's mayo on twelve grain bread is a jobsite lunch staple for me. 

 

Weaver's of Wellsville  is local to me. Good sweet bologna and lots of other tasty meat goodies. Worth checking out if you get back to the area. 

 

 

 

 

I'm amused that you would remember that, Mike. Close enough to being a kid as I was in my twenties. Still have the recipe committed to memory for when I build my smokehouse.😉

You can get Duke's mayonnaise in Pennsylvania?  Duke's is one of the indicators of an advanced civilization.

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10 hours ago, Cooter Brown said:

You can get Duke's mayonnaise in Pennsylvania?  Duke's is one of the indicators of an advanced civilization.

 

Dunno about that, but have discovered that you can get Dot's Pretzels in PA.  Found one single bag at the Shady Maples Market, of all places.  To give you an idea of the nature of that place, here's a pic of two pick-ups in the parking lot:

 

6-27-20 - Amish pick-up truck

 

 

We discovered Dot's for the first time in the Dakotas.  They have actually migrated to here.  Truly the indication of advanced civilization.

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11 hours ago, Cooter Brown said:

You can get Duke's mayonnaise in Pennsylvania?  Duke's is one of the indicators of an advanced civilization.

 

Yes. Duke's started showing up here a few years ago. Life's been a little better ever since. 

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