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Lebanon Bologna


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Thanks Marc! I think I'll go ahead and give it a try. I have a cow elk tag and if I manage to bag an elk, I'd probably use that, otherwise, I'll try it with deer meat.

 

I saw one recipe where it called for maintaining the temperature at 72 degrees for 3 days....is that correct? I think it said smoke temperature at 72, but perhaps it said drying temperature at 72 degrees. It seems like it would be hard to get the wood chips to put out any smoke at 72 degrees!

 

Thanks for the tip!

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On 11/25/2020 at 10:43 PM, idcut said:

Thanks Marc! I think I'll go ahead and give it a try. I have a cow elk tag and if I manage to bag an elk, I'd probably use that, otherwise, I'll try it with deer meat.

 

I saw one recipe where it called for maintaining the temperature at 72 degrees for 3 days....is that correct? I think it said smoke temperature at 72, but perhaps it said drying temperature at 72 degrees. It seems like it would be hard to get the wood chips to put out any smoke at 72 degrees!

 

Thanks for the tip!

 

When I was making it, I was smoking in a walk-in block smokehouse. Temps were considerably higher than 72° as there was an open pit for the wood fire in the center and the bologna sticks (approx 8 lbs ea) hung from bars on the ceiling around the fire. A batch was 600lbs and there was no set time for smoking, just kept an eye on it as it smoked. Might smoke a batch in as little as a couple hrs to as much as ten or so. Outside temps, humidity and the wood all factored in. There was a real art to smoking in the walk-in. It was my favorite job at the shop. 

 

Sorry for the ramble, all that to say I'm not much help in the process you're considering. 

 

P.S.- If you'd like the recipe for sweet bologna we used, pm me. It's quite simple but it's also still being used by the new owners of the business. I don't want to post it openly but don't see an issue sharing it with someone a couple thousand miles away. 

 

Let me know here if you pm me, seems none of my notifications are working on my iPad since the upgrade. 

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Thanks Marc....no ramble whatsoever! The smokehouse sounds like quite a set up and 600 lbs...nice! I'll send you a pm.

 

 

Thanks,

again

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4 hours ago, idcut said:

Thanks Marc....no ramble whatsoever! The smokehouse sounds like quite a set up and 600 lbs...nice! I'll send you a pm.

 

 

Thanks,

again

 

Sent you a pm, id. 

 

Yes, it was a great setup. I've considered building a smaller scale one of my own,  just haven't done it yet. That 600lbs was just one run. Most seasons we made 6000-8000 lbs of bologna. Some seasons more. 

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Dave in Maine
On 11/25/2020 at 10:43 PM, idcut said:

Thanks Marc! I think I'll go ahead and give it a try. I have a cow elk tag and if I manage to bag an elk, I'd probably use that, otherwise, I'll try it with deer meat.

 

I saw one recipe where it called for maintaining the temperature at 72 degrees for 3 days....is that correct? I think it said smoke temperature at 72, but perhaps it said drying temperature at 72 degrees. It seems like it would be hard to get the wood chips to put out any smoke at 72 degrees!

 

Thanks for the tip!

Lebanon bologna is a cured, smoked and fermented semi-dry sausage.  Thus, keeping it at room temperature => proper fermentation.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lebanon_bologna

 

While it won't help the Idahoans, if you go back to my post upthread, Dietrichs will turn your venison into Lebanon bologna (as well as other delicacies).  https://dietrichsmeats.com/deerandwildgame.html  I suspect their little note on that page "strongly encouraging" bringing the deer fully skinned and boned will save the hunter considerable money.

 

I'm sure there are other country butchers out there who will do much the same.

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I'd need to do a bit of research of sausage shops in the area (not many), but I doubt there are any that make the Lebanon bologna. It seems most do the usual summer and Polish or German style sausage and pepperoni sticks and that's about it.

 

I imagine it would be a bit cheaper to have it skinned and boned before taking it to Deitrich's. 

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Just found that our local deli has Seltzer's in two varieties, one of them Sweet and that's what I decided to try.  Pretty intense flavor, although it made up a decent sandwich the intensity means to me it's similar to pepperoni and salami in that it'd be better as one of the meats in a sandwich rather than the sole contributor.  Or used with cheeses and crackers to snack.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 11/20/2020 at 6:12 AM, Dave in Maine said:

Says this guy raised in Pennsylvania on Dutchie cuisine, "it's a Pennsylvania thing.  Because it's good, it's spread slowly across the northeast."  I can get Seltzers here in Maine, and I can get scrapple, too.  Just had the last of a pound of it with my eggs.

 

This place ships.  Their stuff isn't cheap, but it is good.  I buy in person at the Allentown Farmers' Market when in the area.

https://sclydeweaver.com/product/lebanon-bologna/

 

This place, I don't think they ship. If you phone they might.  But they make it all there.  Like 6 or 8 variations on Lebanon bologna, summer bologna, you name it.   Just surfing their site is like a trip to Meat Heaven.  It's right off I-78 on top of a hill - there's a billboard.  You can smell the smoke down at the corner.  When you come out, your clothes will smell of smoke.  About as good as it gets.  Not cheap, but worth it.

https://dietrichsmeats.com/index.html

 

For those needing scrapple, you can get Habersett's off Amazon.  This might be the best priced deal:  6 lb for $33 plus shipping.  I usually buy Habersett's when in Philly, though Hatfield's is just as good.

thanks for the links, got my shipment the other day from S Clyde Weaver

Lebanon bologna, garlic ring bologna and some aged cheddar

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Rockford Setters

I bought some Lebanon bologna yesterday at Yoders in Tustin, Michigan yesterday.  Going to have some for lunch today on their whole wheat bread and pepper jack cheese.  should be a good sandwich.

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