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Waiting for fruit, how long?


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I have a ruffed grouse grocery store planted around my house, hackberry, washington hawthorn, siberian crabapple....etc. 

I started much of this as bare root seedlings and have nurtured them along for 5 years now. How long or at what height/age/stage will they start to produce fruit? 

My place has an old apple tree(unknown variety) that is biannual bearing and a oriental or chinese crab tree that bears fruit fruit every year. It's a good pollinator and were here and well established before I arrived. 

I also have planted a Prairie fire crab that I spent some money on to speed up time and bought established that has produced well for a couple seasons now, my seedlings are not far behind in size age maturity to this PF crab but they show no sign of bearing fruit yet. Any tips other than be patient? 

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15 hours ago, Kansas Big Dog said:

Have you fertilized? May want to take a soil sample and see what they need.

I have not. 

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Rockford Setters

Hawthorns take quite a while to produce fruit unfortunately. Do you have them caged to keep the deer from browsing them?  How about mulch around the bases?

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At least with citrus, there is no lengthy period for  fruit production with grafts from fruit producing mature trees.   There is from seed, however.  Perhaps some apple growing specialists could chime in regarding grafts.  Check with your county agent regarding grafting.  Look under Hank County, Kimbal Agent.  ;) Gil

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Kansas Big Dog
19 hours ago, ScottGrush said:

I have not. 

 

You can probably go through your local Extension office and get soil sample bags and have your soil tested. They may even be able to tell you what you need to do to make the soil more fertile.

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13 hours ago, Rockford Setters said:

Hawthorns take quite a while to produce fruit unfortunately. Do you have them caged to keep the deer from browsing them?  How about mulch around the bases?

Yes all that.

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I might try and stress one into making fruit, I've read a little and talked to few folks that said stress can fired up production. 

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Kansas Big Dog
13 hours ago, Kansas Big Dog said:

 

You can probably go through your local Extension office and get soil sample bags and have your soil tested. They may even be able to tell you what you need to do to make the soil more fertile.

It could be the ph of the soil.

 

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11 hours ago, Kansas Big Dog said:

It could be the ph of the soil.

 

No one was doing soil samples last year due to covid. If they start taking them again I'll submit a sample. 

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WI Outdoor Nut
6 minutes ago, ScottGrush said:

No one was doing soil samples last year due to covid. If they start taking them again I'll submit a sample. 

Yes, taking soil samples can be very dangerous, best to not do them?!?  

 

Sometimes I think companies and organizations are using excuses due to covid.  Kind of like our DNR said they were not doing grouse drumming samples this past spring, due to covid.  If there is a safe activity, it is sitting in your car, and listing for drumming.  SMH.  

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13 hours ago, ScottGrush said:

I might try and stress one into making fruit, I've read a little and talked to few folks that said stress can fired up production. 

That's true with annuals, much less so with perennials.

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I'm guessing 5-8 years before good production, depends on how big they were going in. Lots of other factors like browsing from deer, root competition, water, light, etc.  I appreciate the long view and applaud your efforts.  I agree with KBD's advice and the local extension office is a good source of info. 

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Fertilizer is your friend.  I asked an expert once whether I should fertilize my transplanted wild blueberry bushes.  His response was "The only reason not to fertilize something is if you do not want it to grow."...SelbyLowndes

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Hi Scott

 

not sure where you are located, but soil samples are not hard to take your self and send in to a reputable lab for analysis.

 

 

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