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Whitetail Tenderloins


SelbyLowndes

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I prepped the tenderloins from my small deer this year by rubbing with Lawry Seasoning Salt, Lemon Pepper, and  worstershire (sp?).  Then cooked (sauteed) in butter to medium rare on stovetop. No better meat on the planet...SelbyLowndes

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15 minutes ago, SelbyLowndes said:

I prepped the tenderloins from my small deer this year by rubbing with Lawry Seasoning Salt, Lemon Pepper, and  worstershire (sp?).  Then cooked (sauteed) in butter to medium rare on stovetop. No better meat on the planet...SelbyLowndes

Agree. I do similar, but generally just cut the inner tenderloin into inch thick medallions, season with S&P and sear in butter. The best cut often confused with the second best cut-backstraps.  Tenderloins are on the menu this week. We had venison burgers last night. (I grind some ground pork into my venison burger) 

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Had tenderloins last night.  Onion and mushroom in butter then tenderloins cut in inch thick medallions.  Little garlic powder and seasoned salt.  Tremendous.  The best part of shooting a deer.   

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It is interesting how some folks confuse the backstraps with the tenderloin.  Also, it must be a southern thing, but down here they call the inner tenderloins "Fish" for some reason.  Need to figure that one out.   To me the true tenderloins with salt and pepper and then flash seared on hot skillet till browned and then off the heat and butter added and spooned over the fillets.  Pretty dang special indeed.  For the backstraps, I often will butterfly those 2" thick becomes 1" thick and then marinate in Italian Dressing and put on a hot grill and then pull off to rest at rare covered loosely with foil.  They will finish at a nice medium rare.   I'll also pan sear the backstrap butterflies in bacon grease and serve them with dippy eggs and fried taters.  What a breakfast. 

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I really miss tenderloins, and backstraps, I have not tasted venison in some time. I have not bow hunted in years and my mind does not turn to deer season until I am on my way back from grouse camp the sunday before opener, does not make for much success in our short rifle season. I really took for granted just how easy the deer hunting was in IA when I lived down there. 

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52 minutes ago, tut said:

It is interesting how some folks confuse the backstraps with the tenderloin.  Also, it must be a southern thing, but down here they call the inner tenderloins "Fish" for some reason.  Need to figure that one out....

A lot of Maine hunters call the backstraps tenderloins. Ive heard the “fish” term for the inner loin/tenderloins. My guess is when you take them out they do sorta look like a fish.

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I'll agree that venison tenderloin is good eating but they do not compare to an elk or moose tenderloin. The last two elk we've killed were celebrated with us eating grilled tenderloin the evening we got them off the mountain. That beats eating the liver by a mile,,imo. 

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I take the inner tenderloins as soon as my deer is hanging. They get tidied up and go in the fridge to chill.

The next day I butterfly them lengthwise, brush them with a bit of oil and season with Kosher salt, cracked pepper, garlic powder and Keen's dry mustard.

They go on a hot grill for at most a couple minutes per side then get tented under foil for 5-10 minutes. Perfect medium rare. They are always our first taste of the new deer and let us know what this year's vittles will be like.

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Backstraps are confused with tenderloin because the "backstraps" are the equivalent of the beef "loin" cuts (sirloin, short loin, top loin).  Some people try to differentiate on a deer by referring to the backstraps as "outer loin" and the tenderloin as the "inner loin".   But I like to call the loin "backstraps" and the tenderloins "tenderloins" myself.  My favorite cuts are actually the backstraps.  They are so uniform in shape its easy to cook them and the grain is such that it seems uniquely "deer" to me.   The tenderloins on a deer are small and I've always cooked them whole or halved, but that means to get the large end medium rare, the small end ends up medium well.  (I usually solve that by cutting the small end off as soon as its medium rare and eat them right off the pan while standing over the stove waiting for the rest to cook.)  

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8 hours ago, SelbyLowndes said:

I prepped the tenderloins from my small deer this year by rubbing with Lawry Seasoning Salt, Lemon Pepper, and  worstershire (sp?).  Then cooked (sauteed) in butter to medium rare on stovetop. No better meat on the planet...SelbyLowndes

The only thing I like better is the Tenderloin of an Antelope cooked exactly the same way.  Simply the best!

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Around our home the tenderloins never make it to the freezer. They are our favorite part of the deer and usually are in the frying pan with S&P with butter before we are finished butchering the deer.

 

My wife is a city rat from Barcelona. From the big city to our rural home in Central Minnesota is a huge cultural difference for her. When we first moved here she was skeptical on my deer hunting in the backyard. She was even more so with eating the deer.  The first deer I took on our property I cooked up the tenderloins for her. She was a quick convert to venison as good food.  During deer season if she hears a shot she will text me asking " was that you? should I get the skillet ready?"

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I like to cut them about an inch thick, shake them in a bag with flour, black pepper and garlic salt...then cook in butter in cast iron...rare....the best...although I do like wood duck breasts too.....

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On 12/10/2020 at 4:43 PM, tut said:

It is interesting how some folks confuse the backstraps with the tenderloin.  Also, it must be a southern thing, but down here they call the inner tenderloins "Fish" for some reason.  Need to figure that one out.   To me the true tenderloins with salt and pepper and then flash seared on hot skillet till browned and then off the heat and butter added and spooned over the fillets.  Pretty dang special indeed.  For the backstraps, I often will butterfly those 2" thick becomes 1" thick and then marinate in Italian Dressing and put on a hot grill and then pull off to rest at rare covered loosely with foil.  They will finish at a nice medium rare.   I'll also pan sear the backstrap butterflies in bacon grease and serve them with dippy eggs and fried taters.  What a breakfast. 

Dippy Eggs?

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8 minutes ago, Spin said:

Dippy Eggs?

Sunny side up.  For us Southern types dippy eggs are the one's where you crack the yokes with your fork and then dip your toast or bacon in.  Hence the term Dippy Eggs.

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