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Whitetail Tenderloins


SelbyLowndes

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3 minutes ago, tut said:

Sunny side up.  For us Southern types dippy eggs are the one's where you crack the yokes with your fork and then dip your toast or bacon in.  Hence the term Dippy Eggs.

UJ is a wealth of regional knowledge...I’m hunting ‘partridge’ til end of the month.

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4 minutes ago, Brad Eden said:

UJ is a wealth of regional knowledge...I’m hunting ‘partridge’ til end of the month.

Yep, you hear partridge and "Pats" quite a bit "Up Nort" in this part of the country too.

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Now that we're clear about the inside loin muscle on a deer being the tenderloin and the outer loin being the backstrap.  What is the cut off beef corresponding with the deer's tenderloin properly called?  I've always wondered...SelbyLowndes

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Dippy eggs and "fish"... Didn't know York county PA was "The South" but apparently it is. Quite familiar with both terms. I always assumed they were just common usage and not local vernacular.

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52 minutes ago, SelbyLowndes said:

Now that we're clear about the inside loin muscle on a deer being the tenderloin and the outer loin being the backstrap.  What is the cut off beef corresponding with the deer's tenderloin properly called?  I've always wondered...SelbyLowndes

The....tenderloin....🙂.

When it comes to beef, Hanger is IMO even better. A mysterious cut that's hard to pin down as to origin. Every carcass only has one apparently. As near as I can figure it's the muscle that suspends the mesentery and small and large intestines?

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I always called what you call dippy eggs, "runny eggs".....same thing though....they are sunny side up and with a runny yolk to dip your toast in...

 

However....I think the best way to cook them, is in bacon fat and even though you don't turn them over, you do use a large spoon and you tilt the pan, so you can spoon hot bacon fat over the tops, so the edges get bubbly and you cook the top a bit and there is a slight skin on the yolk rather than all that clear schmeggy stuff on top.......

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The runnier SSU eggs are the more yellow yolk I get down the front of my last clean hunting shirt...SelbyLowndes 

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21 hours ago, Spin said:

Yep, you hear partridge and "Pats" quite a bit "Up Nort" in this part of the country too.

My New England hunting/fishing mentor called 'em "Biddies". Also pa'tridge.

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The only part of a quadruped that is called the tenderloin is the psoas muscle, the long round-ish muscle that runs from just anterior of the kidneys up to the 12-14th rib. Cut cross section , ie: t-bone steaks, it is that juicy round chunk that sits nestled tightly inside the "T" separated from the larger strip loin by the long part of the "T" bone. Generally these steaks are called filet mignon.

 

I personally would not opt for tenderloin, which has only tenderness going for it. A better choice for me, is the well marbled and equally tender ribeye.

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33 minutes ago, SelbyLowndes said:

Tenderloin, filet mignon, chateaubriand.  Same all; gets confusing...SelbyLowndes 

Deer meat.

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Elk backstrap for dinner tonight. Didn't feel like firing up the BBQ, so I broiled them to med rare, seasoned with salt, pepper and a little liquid smoke rubbed all over. Ate them with some chimichurri sauce I made....ummmmm!

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On 12/13/2020 at 3:06 PM, Ben Hong said:

The only part of a quadruped that is called the tenderloin is the psoas muscle, the long round-ish muscle that runs from just anterior of the kidneys up to the 12-14th rib. Cut cross section , ie: t-bone steaks, it is that juicy round chunk that sits nestled tightly inside the "T" separated from the larger strip loin by the long part of the "T" bone. Generally these steaks are called filet mignon.

 

I personally would not opt for tenderloin, which has only tenderness going for it. A better choice for me, is the well marbled and equally tender ribeye.

I agree on the ribeye. I've been buying whole boneless Prime roast and either cut all into steaks or put on the BGE and lightly smoke over apple wood; that'll be on the table for Christmas dinner.

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