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Deer are amazingly tough animals


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I started seeing this young buck in the yard occasionally with a small group of others. He had a noticeable limp. I also thought I saw something on his hoof. I looked at him through binoculars out the kitchen window and couldn’t tell what it was. After pulling a card in one of my trail cameras I got this picture.28056DC8-4DFD-42E5-AD67-D0C087DF8ACB.thumb.jpeg.a66d2a3082c04fdc2e6862ff5cd82236.jpeg

He obviously has something stuck perfectly around his hoof. I’m thinking some kind of bearing or something. It obviously has some weight to it. I saw him occasionally through the fall. Then didn’t see him for awhile. I then pulled all my cards and these pictures revealed what happened to his leg.0F2A6850-A075-4C4B-9C6B-D44EC44AEBCE.thumb.jpeg.494768d62b04bd8d99ef017b88aad041.jpeg

He is a very unlucky deer to have perfectly step on something that wedged onto his hoof.

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The leg somehow eventually broke off. I just can’t imagine how this whole scenario progressed!

Like I said whatever he wedged onto that hoof was very heavy. I hope he survives after his terrible luck.

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So true. So true. Anyone who has hunted deer long enough has blood trailed/tracked a poorly hit deer they shot or someone else shot, or even a vehicle hit deer. I’ve blood tracked deer that were hit in the leg and found bone chips along the way, and jumped that deer and saw it scramble to it’s feet and run on 3 legs like it had all 4. Those deer will often live if they can avoid coyotes. (I’m not trying to steer this thread towards the usual bashing if deer hunters that may have made a bad shot, generally we all do if we hunt long enough, whether it’s a deer or a bird or a squirrel) 

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Maybe.  But I think it's more that humans are just wimps and animals are the norm when it comes to that kinda stuff.  

 

Good thing will have big brains or we would be extinct.  

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There was an old doe around the farm that had a back leg shot off at the hock. She raised twins two more years no problem. Also had a female coyote with a back leg shot off. She had a litter of 5 pups next spring. I would feed her once in a while.

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I skinned a deer for a friend 2 years ago and there were 2 30 cal bullets under the hide. One along the top of the back, and another in the armpit. How the bullets could've gone through or into this deer and not killed it is beyond me.

 

The toughness and will to live of all animals always surprises me. It's very cool.

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Exceptions don't make the rule. I have found too many deer , aided by crows and ravens a week or two after opening day to believe  that survivors of such injuries are commonplace.   I hate to imagine the suffering it must cause.  

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1 hour ago, lee sykes said:

Exceptions don't make the rule. I have found too many deer , aided by crows and ravens a week or two after opening day to believe  that survivors of such injuries are commonplace.   I hate to imagine the suffering it must cause.  

I agree that too many deer get wounded during deer seasons. I also think that not every deer drops like a sack of rocks and many sustain killing shots but the hunter doesn’t follow up hard enough or give it a good go on blood tracking or gives up to easy. I think it’s too bad that the art of persistent blood tracking is disappearing, but think all the dog trackers around now are a good thing, 

 

I heard a shot at first light real close behind the house the second week of this years rifle season. My neighbor on one side owns well over 100 acres and has food plots and box blinds etc. I headed back there an hour and a half later and found a blood trail leading across my thin slice of land to the opposite neighbors land of another over 100 acres. There was no indication anyone was following it. I did, and jumped the deer. I left it and went back home and returned two hours later. Still no indication anyone was looking for it. I blood tracked that deer for hours. Ended up a spot of blood every 20 yards, then I had to circle to find the trail. I found where it had lied down and found a pool of blood with pink lung tissue in in. Good and bad. I figured it was severely hit deer but that tissue would plug up the already spotty bullet hole. I was right, I found a few drops of blood after and then it entered a wide open hardwood ridge with a steep cliff on one side. I lost it there. I circled the whole piece to get back to my house and found one more drop of blood by chance way far away from where I had last found some. Tough deer. Some make it if only one lunged. I have no idea if this one did.

 

To be fair and in the spirit of how I stick up for lowly deer hunters... I also find (well my dogs do) too many winged and uncollected grouse and particularly woodcock. It can be chronic for Woodcock if I hunt in area that is heavily bird hunted and Woodcock flights are prolific. 

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Upland_Hunter

Back in 2003 I hit a doe behind the shoulder and the deer started to run. I followed the blood trail and the deer ran for almost a mile before it fell over. Amazingly tough animalsAA

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Back in 2013 or so this buck inexplicably (for Maine) walked into a field to my run of bleet calls followed by tending clicky grunt calls, in broad daylight. He walked right to my ground blind along the edge. I had to shoot him at maybe 15-20 yards before he joined me. It was a frontal chest shot. I probably should have aimed for the neck. He ran to the opposite wood line around 75 yards away and into the woods. I couldn’t find a spot of blood or hair at the shot spot, nor in his direction across the field, nor any while doing circles inside the woods where he entered. I went back and sat on my stool feeling sick to my stomach and flabbergasted. It was starting to get dusky and I went back to where he entered the woods and kept looking for blood in the remaining light. Nothing. I cut through the woods to a trail I needed follow out to my truck as it got dark. I was going over the shot in my mind, and knowing I’d have a sleepless night and be back in the morning to look. I hit the trail stoop shouldered and started out. As I walked along I glanced to my right and saw some light colored rocks or something, I kept walking, then turned and checked it out. It was his white belly and he was lying dead 15 yards off the trail. He had gone maybe a total of 100 yards from the point he was hit. He had circled to right after he hit the woods and never left a drop of blood. Bullet went the length of his body and lodged in the rear quarter. You have to look and look some more, and then look some more if your gut tells you that you hit a deer. JMO FWIW.

 

 

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  • 1 month later...
Richard Hale

Hoof of a doe I guided to last week. Walked with limp but ran well. Injury not related to hunting. Leg was atrophied and locked up by the body. 
I guide to one or more injured deer every year. Most injuries involve legs or eyes. Causes range from archery hunters to cars, fighting and unknown causes. After many years of guiding I realized that a rough death is the norm for deer. Exceptions are getting fatally hit by car or shot well. 
I don’t like it when a hunter wounds a deer but it’s no worse than most ways they die. 

 

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