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Flushing Dog Basics


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1 hour ago, ESSNovice said:

Hup means sit, and I wouldn't bother teaching both. Its honestly kind of nice to have "sit" mean nothing to the dog when so many folks just approach a puppy and start babbling commands. One pip on the whistle means hup from everything I've read or seen at spaniel events. Two pips means turn--IIRC, there may be a traditional verbal command for this ("come round"?), but I haven't heard it used. I taught mine to "turn" on voice b/c I forgot a whistle once. Now there's at least one spare in each vehicle.

Four or five pips for recall. Some folks, myself included, use a long high-low to draw the dog in close for a cast.


This reminds me. I also do a double toot to get the dogs attention when hunting, and when they stop and look I can direct them with hand signals. Not sure if this is standard but better than a single toot and have them sit. At least for how I hunt. I also say “Huntemup” when I release them. This rockets them into the cover.

 

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...on another note;  Someone mentioned non field English Cockers. I was always under the assumption that the “English” cockers have largely been kept as field lines, as opposed to the “American” Cocker. I also dont buy the suggestion or dismissal that a person can only get solid info on training on show/bench bred spaniels “off the internet”. I will say I that do not suggest anybody who is even the least bit an earnest Upland bird hunter purposely buy a Show/Bench line of dog. But if stuck with one, for whatever reason, they can be trained and won’t win any field trials, but they can become successful bird hunting dogs. My first back yard bred Golden did for sure. And my Springers aren’t full field bred by design (somewhat eccentric and somewhat well known Maine woman guide/breeder) and I initially train them just like I would a field bred spaniel. By reading books, hunting with others who own spaniels, talking to others who are more experienced, attending a few trials, and discussing and gleaning information on a discussion forum. JMO FWIW

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1 hour ago, Sheldrake said:

I'm curious.......do you spaniel guys require your dogs to "Hup" on the flush? My brother is trying to train his cockers to do that and it's a struggle.

That’s advanced finished dog training. I have never done that, I certainly would recommend it, especially if you hunt with others, for safety reasons if nothing else. Springers can really spring high on the flush and if chasing a flushed bird and someone not familiar with that could shoot too low...and that’s a tragedy. but I am generally a solo hunter and never felt undergunned or particularly compromised without that.

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2 hours ago, Brad Eden said:

 ...on another note;  Someone mentioned non field English Cockers. I was always under the assumption that the “English” cockers have largely been kept as field lines, as opposed to the “American” Cocker. 

 

 

Just the Opposite of that thinking. English Cocker have been divided a long time. Between the show Bred version and Field Bred Version.

The American Cocker is not a divided it is only Bred for their conformation and looks.

 

Hal

 

 

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17 hours ago, Hal Standish said:

 

Just the Opposite of that thinking. English Cocker have been divided a long time. Between the show Bred version and Field Bred Version.

The American Cocker is not a divided it is only Bred for their conformation and looks.

 

Hal

 

 

Interesting. I’ve only ever seen field bred English Cockers. And bench American Cockers. 

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26 minutes ago, Brad Eden said:

Interesting. I’ve only ever seen field bred English Cockers. And bench American Cockers. 

 If you want to see Bench Bred English Cocker you would have to go to a Dog Show. Dog shows are held every Sunday and some Saturdays through out the country.

 

Hal

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4 minutes ago, Hal Standish said:

 If you want to see Bench Bred English Cocker you would have to go to a Dog Show. Dog shows are held every Sunday and some Saturdays through out the country.

 

Hal

I have no desire to seek them out. I wasn’t aware the English Cocker breed had been separated by any degree by field and bench much like Springer Spaniels. What the difference? Outside of the hunt in them, Is it largely looks and confirmation like Springers?

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7 minutes ago, Brad Eden said:

I have no desire to seek them out. I wasn’t aware the English Cocker breed had been separated by any degree by field and bench much like Springer Spaniels. What the difference? Outside of the hunt in them, Is it largely looks and confirmation like Springers?

 

I do not know the History as well on EC and the division in the breed but I would guess it has been ....forever Field breeds came first as it was in Springer, the Bench breds were recognized. Confirmation or Bench bred dogs are always about the look. The chiseling in the Head, the angulation in the rear, the tail set, the length of back, and movement in the ring, straightness in the teeth and a proper bite. Those are the items that Bench Breeders think about when putting the Stud to the bitch. It is never about drive, nose, flushing strength, marking ability or training cooperation. That's why I made the statement about where to look for training help if you have a Bench bred dog. Bench breeders have little to no experience in developing a dog for field work. In fact the vast majority of them would not like to see their dogs in the field i.e. "Field work will tare the dogs coat up", cannot have that,"the show Judge would not want to see that in the Ring".

 

Hal

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I'm guessing the OP is asking about flushing dog convention, whatever that might be.  But the pup should be quite capable of learning whatever commands one wants to associate with actions: be they voice, whistle and/or gesture.  My guys, flushing and pointing, have learned all three plus, in the case of those living when we still had quail, "bird" and "animal". 

 

Our bobs were no gentlemen and most would haul ass at the sound of tires braking on gravel, much less human voices or whistles.  So I added a heron-like "ep" for stop (be it sit or whoa) and a nutria or deer-like bleet "neee" for turn.  Made a difference.

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1 hour ago, Rick Hall said:

Our bobs were no gentlemen 

I hunted a new spot today and saw a covey of about 12 flush before we got there. They got up from an large area with chest high blackberry briers. BRUTAL. 

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  • 2 weeks later...
Hal Standish
On 12/20/2020 at 8:55 PM, Payton said:

I hunted a new spot today and saw a covey of about 12 flush before we got there. They got up from an large area with chest high blackberry briers. BRUTAL. 

 

Not sure about this. Were you hunting your friends Cocker?

 

Hal

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14 hours ago, Hal Standish said:

 

Not sure about this. Were you hunting your friends Cocker?

 

Hal

No. I have a pointer and we won't hunt our dogs together, but his dog is still very young.

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Hal Standish
On 12/19/2020 at 12:28 PM, Hal Standish said:

 

Just the Opposite of that thinking. English Cocker have been divided a long time. Between the show Bred version and Field Bred Version.

The American Cocker is not a divided it is only Bred for their conformation and looks.

 

Hal

 

 

 

On 12/20/2020 at 6:19 AM, Brad Eden said:

Interesting. I’ve only ever seen field bred English Cockers. And bench American Cockers. 

 

 

A very short vid of a English Cocker, Reese, show bred in fact a show champion both UKC and AKC. I knew i had one in my Library some where.

 

 

 

And another Vid of Show Ch Reese making a nice retrieve up and over a my training hill ../.

 

 

Hal

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