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3 Rib prime rib roast


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I spent a number of years cooking professionally in a steak and prime rib house. I cook prime rib and yorkshire pudding at home at least 4 times a year. Best method I have found is the closed door method. Look it up. Basically you get the oven to 500 degrees, put the roast in a cook for approx 4 1/2 min a pound (depends on how rare you like it). Then you turn off the oven and let it sit in the oven for 2 hours without opening the oven door. Best, most evenly cooked and most accurate for doneness method I have ever used.

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Happy Festivus Stump.....and AL

SUCCESS !    I can cook . 

Actually brother James I believe we make a great team together!   Thanks for the heads up on the deflation. I didn't know that until just now when I read what you said. Yes I was disappointe

2 or 3 ribs I buy this time of year to make steaks. Most are not really prime rib roasts but choice grade and technically a standing rib roast. But if you look around can find prime grade standing rib roast for $13-$14 a pound. Normally it is $20 or more a pound. I prefer prime grade for any beef when ever I can find it. If your getting bone in might as well get the whole rib 🙂

 

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They pair well with smoked nuts and smoked cheeses along with a port as an appetizer IME

 

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Blizzard warning starts at 2 PM today here and I have 25 pounds of smoked cheese I did along with 15 pounds of smoked nuts to deliver for Christmas presents.

 

Doesn't matter if your cooking beef in the oven smoker or grill, to have it the most tender you want to reverse sear it. Bring it up close to internal temperature FIRST and then sear it.

 

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Which is the problem with the Chef John method and closed door method which both are the sear and slide method. Which is backwards and the meat is not as tender as a reverse sear when finished. Still good and it works. But reverse sear is better for tenderness. @dogrunner method is reverse sear, he understands it. And if you smoke meat is pretty common.

 

It does require an accurate thermometer and I have a bunch of them for smoking, grilling and the oven. Mine are all Thermoworks.  

 

Hard to go wrong with Alton Brown IME. He uses a Thermoworks Dot for a 3 Rib Standing Roast. I also have one I use for the oven.

 

 

Even do Yorkshire pudding while your at it with his directions 🙂

 

I salt all my steaks with kosher salt and let them rest at room temperature until they come up to room temperature. Not too salty. With beef hard to go wrong with basic salt and pepper. Sometimes I get bored with it and will use Montreal Steak Seasoning for a change up, even on standing rib roast.

 

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Kosher salt , course ground pepper , Colman's dry mustard and rosemary . Dry the roast and rub all over and let come up to room temp , 4-5 hrs.  Roast to desired temp " Rare,medium or god forbid well"

I have seasoned the night before and pulled from the fridge to come to room temp with out issues. Do this for big mofo's  One of the biggest mistakes is not letting the roast rest long enough before slicing and serving.

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2 hours ago, canvasback said:

I spent a number of years cooking professionally in a steak and prime rib house. I cook prime rib and yorkshire pudding at home at least 4 times a year. Best method I have found is the closed door method. Look it up. Basically you get the oven to 500 degrees, put the roast in a cook for approx 4 1/2 min a pound (depends on how rare you like it). Then you turn off the oven and let it sit in the oven for 2 hours without opening the oven door. Best, most evenly cooked and most accurate for doneness method I have ever used.

Give us the Yorkshire Pudding recipe? Do you do it in the drippings, in the pan or in muffin tins?

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I do the closed door/500 degree method....if you don't have Herbs de Provence for the butter paste, you can use what I call the Simon and Garfunkel spice mix....parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme.....but I add black pepper and garlic powder...I also go light on the thyme and heavy on the rosemary.....  I'd also like to learn how to do Yorkshire Pudding with this method....

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53 minutes ago, Spiller said:

I do the closed door/500 degree method....if you don't have Herbs de Provence for the butter paste, you can use what I call the Simon and Garfunkel spice mix....parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme.....but I add black pepper and garlic powder...I also go light on the thyme and heavy on the rosemary.....  I'd also like to learn how to do Yorkshire Pudding with this method....

 

Go to ~3:25 mark on the Alton Brown video I posted. I think even Al now has a 12" cast iron pan!

 

Not sure how it will turn out with all those spices in the dripping though. Interesting as I use rosemary lightly and mainly only in Memphis rubs for pork butts. The only plant\flower I have in my house is a thyme plant as I use a lot of it in my cooking when I want a savory flavor. But don't use much of either for beef. Personal preference of course.

 

Also not sure how much drippings you will get doing it backwards with the sear first. Using the oven to do the sear most of the drippings burns off. Another reason for getting a good thermometer and doing a reverse sear 😝

 

When resting meat and coming up to room temperature no matter what I do I never exceed the FDA recommendation of more than 2 hours in the danger zone of room temperature.

 

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Unless treated with curing salt, bacon, sausage, jerky, etc. Not to be confused with pink salt, kosher salt, or table salt.

 

Which reminds me I need to pick up another pork belly soon

 

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The "Chef John" approach does work, but with a note of caution.  I've know some folks who have followed this recipe exactly and gotten an overcooked roast.  Lots of chatter over the years on various food blogs and forums about this; the consensus is that you MUST keep a thermometer in the roast the entire time and pull it out at your desired temp and not go simply by time.  Some newer ovens are very well insulated and will hold heat much better than those made a few years ago; especially true when talking about high end commercial-style ovens that are popular these days.

 

So follow the recipe but keep an eye on the temp more than the clock.

 

FWIW,

Dave

 

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4 minutes ago, Dave Quindt said:

The "Chef John" approach does work, but with a note of caution.  I've know some folks who have followed this recipe exactly and gotten an overcooked roast.  Lots of chatter over the years on various food blogs and forums about this; the consensus is that you MUST keep a thermometer in the roast the entire time and pull it out at your desired temp and not go simply by time.  Some newer ovens are very well insulated and will hold heat much better than those made a few years ago; especially true when talking about high end commercial-style ovens that are popular these days.

 

So follow the recipe but keep an eye on the temp more than the clock.

 

FWIW,

Dave

 

I never use time, because usually it over cooks and an overdone Prime in my eyes is a waste of meat. I always use a meat thermometer and I normally stay at the lower temperature of whatever meat I’m cooking. 

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drummer's stump

It is just meat, put that #$#*#*$ in the smoker at 275 and check it in 4 hours. It is not rocket science! Never met anyone so scared of a piece of meat, then again you did screw up a PRE-COOKED  turkey. Who buys a pre- cooked anyway?? I have done hundreds of pounds of prime rib, 3 or 4 whole ribs at a time and he just won't listen, then he wonders where his daughter gets it from....

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"stump" , you are swiftly falling to the bottom of the gun recipient list . How does Amanda put up with you ?

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7 hours ago, canvasback said:

I spent a number of years cooking professionally in a steak and prime rib house. I cook prime rib and yorkshire pudding at home at least 4 times a year. Best method I have found is the closed door method. Look it up. Basically you get the oven to 500 degrees, put the roast in a cook for approx 4 1/2 min a pound (depends on how rare you like it). Then you turn off the oven and let it sit in the oven for 2 hours without opening the oven door. Best, most evenly cooked and most accurate for doneness method I have ever used.

Still looking at how to do Yorkshire Pudding this way, without overcooking the pudding or opening the oven?...or is it a totally separate thing while the roast rests? Still would appreciate the recipe on how you do it.... thanks...

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1 hour ago, Spiller said:

Still looking at how to do Yorkshire Pudding this way, without overcooking the pudding or opening the oven?...or is it a totally separate thing while the roast rests? Still would appreciate the recipe on how you do it.... thanks...


Sorry. Read the request, then forgot to answer. 
 

While I was raised on the muffin pan style, I prefer doing it in the pan. In the drippings, although I usually need to add extra fat. I often use bacon fat. Because I’m doing the prime rib in the closed oven, the Yorkshire comes after. Pull the meat out and instantly crank the oven temp again. Works best when the fat and drippings in the pan are smoking hot when you pour the batter in. Usually takes less than 20 min of cooking time. 
 

Pan Yorkshire is a different animal than the other style. The muffin tin type is all air and crispy crust. The best part of the pan style, IMHO, is the solid, dense central portion. Laden with that unique flavour. I’ll dig out my specific recipe and post it for you. 

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I agree the muffin type might as well just be popovers.

 

My mother made Yorkshire pudding right in the roasting pan right next to the roast beef.  She went to her grave never divulging how she did roast beef and Yorkshire pudding.

 

My wife turns every roast, no mater what kind into pot roast...not that there is anything the matter with that! But still...

 

The only roast beef that I could even approximate to my mothers style was the closed oven for two hours after the high heat recipe....it makes sense to pull out the meat and then add the batter to the roasting pan...yeah I'd really appreciate your full recipe....Tah, as we say in Jolly Olde England.

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17 hours ago, gunsrus said:

"stump" , you are swiftly falling to the bottom of the gun recipient list . How does Amanda put up with you ?

I hope that moved me up to Number 1. 😉

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