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Restoring longleaf pines


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mister grouse

The entire wild quail triangle of Albany, Thomasville, Tallahassee is built upon propagation and management  of longleaf pine interspersed with good ground covers.  

 

Books:

Longleaf, As far as the Eye Can See

Looking for Longleaf, The Rise and Fall of an American Forest

 

and: Conserving Southern Longleaf: Herbert Stodard and the Rise of Ecological Land Management 

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Saw a good documentary on Amazon prime about the long leaf pine. Don’t remember the name but it was good. Do a search and you should be able to locate it. 

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For those of us that love bobwhite's and that have not had the opportunity to walk in a longleaf/wiregrass savannah it is amazing.  It brings your mind back to the hey day of Southern quail hunting.  The first time, a good number of years ago, I got to do this it felt like church to me.  I was overwhelmed by its majesty. Its just amazing....

 

I hope these folks can keep going with this project.  Even more, I hope the folks that follow will appreciate what has been done.

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Flatwoods and wiregrass ecosystems are definitely something I’d like to learn more about.  On Mr. Grouse’s recommendations I drove through this area this fall.  It’s a unique system. I wis I’d had more time to stop at the research station but I’ll be back for sure.  I was pleasantly surprised to see a good amount of logging and burning going on. Fire dependent systems have similar characteristics whether you’re in longleaf, lodgepole, or jackpine. 

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I started planting longleaf about 20 years ago for a variety reasons, including their regional heritage, but also because I could get 15 years of CRP payments vs only 10 for slash or loblolly. It's special now to see them flourishing and being a part of their comeback. 

If you ever want to see this ecosystem at its best, however, do make an effort to visit Ichauway Plantation, Robert Woodruff's old place. I've visited there many times, have quail hunted it once, and always leave about mesmerized with its beauty. They regularly offer programs and opportunities for people to go there and learn about their projects and research. An open house is currently scheduled to take place in the spring of 2021. 

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It does make you think of this sometimes when out planting a handful of seedlings......

 

 

“A society grows great when old men plant trees in whose shade they know they shall never sit.”

 

 

 

 

piBwmUFW_t.gif

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And if you can find a cone producing Longleaf, the opened up cones make a fire starter almost as good as split kindling...SelbyLowndes

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4 hours ago, spring said:

It does make you think of this sometimes when out planting a handful of seedlings......

 

 

“A society grows great when old men plant trees in whose shade they know they shall never sit.”

 

 

 

 

piBwmUFW_t.gif

 

 

Have you had any trouble with "J" rooting with those containerized grass stage Longleaf ?  Just wondering.

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1 hour ago, Huntschool said:

 

 

Have you had any trouble with "J" rooting with those containerized grass stage Longleaf ?  Just wondering.

 

Did have some trouble years ago when their survival rate seemed to be impacted buy how deep they were planted in relation to the subsequent amount of spring rainfall. Problem was, either planted deep or not could be right if the rainfall was unusually heavy or light in the following months, something you obviously couldn't know at planting time. 

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Chukarman

Figure about 300 years for the trees to fully mature.  Assuming there is any intelligent land use in the future.

 

I just ordered 500 SF of reclaimed, antique heart (long leaf yellow) pine to floor a new room in my house. Looking forward to enjoying it for years to come.

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SelbyLowndes

I live in deepest south GA and I've loved the longleaf all my life.  My land is in red clay middle GA though, and the Longleafs want sandy bed/loam ground.  There is a native middle GA longleaf subspecies called the Montane which grows in my area, but I don't find it commercially available for planting.  Oh well, they all look about the same after a few thinnings, so Loblolly it is for me...SelbyLowndes

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On 12/31/2020 at 12:46 PM, spring said:

It does make you think of this sometimes when out planting a handful of seedlings......

 

 

“A society grows great when old men plant trees in whose shade they know they shall never sit.”

 

 

 

 

piBwmUFW_t.gif

Great Post, This SHOULD be the most popular post in this entire thread.

Elicits the same kind of feelings that I felt several decades ago when doing stream work with TU. You saw and worked with

many "Old Timers" out there getting dirty and working up a sweat which for the greatest part, they will not live to see come to full fruition

but knowing this they still labor. Earlier in life they took and they appreciated the gift and they were then giving back. Even back then I found that humbling. 

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Here are two excellent videos on the history and secrets of the longleaf forest.  In the Ole Miss video, Janisse Ray narrates a portion.  Janisse wrote Ecology of a Cracker Childhood, a book alternating chapters between her growing up the daughter of a Pentecostal minister while living in a Baxley, Ga., junkyard, with writing about the history of the longleaf.  Janisse's book was award winning in nature writing.  Stephen Bodio taught her in a writers' workshop decades ago and the class coined her the "Swamp Witch" in tribute to her spell-binding narration of her writing.

 

Secrets of the Longleaf Pine Video Link

 
 
 
Ole Miss Longleaf Film
 
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