Jump to content

New year, new challenge


Recommended Posts

Jalinkly

Interested in trying my hand at freshwater fly fishing. My grown daughter would like to as well. Fishing us not new to us but fly fishing is.  Looking for recommendations for a quality but relatively inexpensive rod reel combo for us to learn the basics.  Thanks for any information.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
shoot-straight

I don't think you can go wrong with the Clearwater series from or is (UJ sponsor). I have many. I got a redington classic trout for my wife. I like That too. Slower actions are better for newbies I think. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
FlyChamps

I'm a self-taught fly caster and it's ugly so I recommend that before buying any equipment both of you get some casting lessons. Every instructor I know has loaner equipment for use during lessons and they can assist you in choosing a rod weight that is suitable for the fishing you plan to do.  Here's a link to the listing of the Fly Fishers International certified instructors FFI Certified Casting Instructors .

 

For beginning equipment the Orvis Clearwater, Orvis Encounter, Echo Base and Redington Path are all good kits including rod, reel and line.  In fact, these are all better than "beginner equipment" and I would be happy to use them long-term.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Geoff Roznak

Let's start out by asking what you are going to be fishing for, and what you think your budget is.

There are lots of great options out there, but having an idea what you're after, and what you want to spend will help a lot.

Link to post
Share on other sites
bntsetter

I have a wildwater setup, 7ft 3wt, that I started my kids out on when they were little.  I liked the smaller rod for them.  The 3wt in my hands casts nice and is fairly forgiving.  Best part of it was the price >$100 for the complete setup.  I will say though you can't really go wrong with the clearwater line or the redington trout or LL bean entry level rods.  A friend has a LL Bean 5wt that surprised me at how well it casted.  But like was said earlier it depends on what you will be casting at as some line weights are better in certain brands.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Jacksdad

where you're gonna be fishing is important as well.  when i lived in frederick i spent a ton of time on big hunting creek.  lots of overhang and trees all along it so a shorter rod was much easier to work.  also could get away with a lighter weight.  you might try anything from a 3wt for small water trout and panfish to a 7wt for pond bass or river smallies.  

 

and don't discount saltwater fly fishing.  i have 2 9wts and a new 8wt and love playing with them.  need certain conditions but much, much fun to be had. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Geoff Roznak
2 hours ago, Jacksdad said:

where you're gonna be fishing is important as well.  when i lived in frederick i spent a ton of time on big hunting creek.  lots of overhang and trees all along it so a shorter rod was much easier to work.  also could get away with a lighter weight.  you might try anything from a 3wt for small water trout and panfish to a 7wt for pond bass or river smallies.  

 

and don't discount saltwater fly fishing.  i have 2 9wts and a new 8wt and love playing with them.  need certain conditions but much, much fun to be had. 

Great points.

I don't fish salt water, but I cover a lot of species in fresh water, from trout, which I don't fish for often, smallmouth and large mouth bass, pike and musky.  That means I have rods from 3 wt. all the way up 11 wt., throwing floating, intermediate sink, and fast sinking lines and flies that include big bass poppers up to musky flies over a foot long.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Jalinkly
On 1/1/2021 at 5:15 PM, Geoff Roznak said:

Let's start out by asking what you are going to be fishing for, and what you think your budget is.
 

I’m on the east coast so pretty much the only trout are stocked, which I’m not a big fan of. Mostly smallmouth and panfish, although with retirement looming, that may change.  
 

A long western trip is planned for 2022 and would love to try the trout in the Rockies with my daughter.  
 

Don’t want a “throw away” rod but don’t want to spend a lot until I know I/we will like it.  So starting, I’d like to spend as little as possible on a decent set up and probably less than $200.  
 

FlyChamps, I never knew there were instructors and this would probably be money well spent to start. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I’ll echo the advice on a lesson—money very well spent!  Others have already mentioned the rod manufacturers I would have and they all make good quality rods.  Keep an eye on Sierra trading post—Some great deals on rods, reels and lines there. 
 

Since you mentioned mostly fresh water then skimp on the reel and spend on the line. The reel is just to keep line out of the way but good line is worth the money!

Link to post
Share on other sites
Geoff Roznak
3 hours ago, Jalinkly said:

I’m on the east coast so pretty much the only trout are stocked, which I’m not a big fan of. Mostly smallmouth and panfish, although with retirement looming, that may change.  

That's great to know - I think most folks assume trout when someone asks about getting into fly fishing.

I fish smallies (and large mouth) a lot and my normal recommendation is to start with an 8 wt. because you can throw the bigger flies best with it...and still throw the smaller flies when you want to.

You can drop down to a 6 wt., just be aware it's going to limit the size of the flies you toss.

A 4 or 5 wt. is probably best for panfish.

One of the first things to learn to avoid is that you're don't to be casting like a trout angler where you try to land a tiny fly on the water with a kiss...smallies actually respond to a decent "splat", I've seen plenty turn towards it.  Panfish too.  Aggressive little rascals.
 

 

3 hours ago, Jalinkly said:

Don’t want a “throw away” rod but don’t want to spend a lot until I know I/we will like it.  So starting, I’d like to spend as little as possible on a decent set up and probably less than $200.  

$200 for rod, reel and line might be tough - a good line is usually going to be at least a quarter of that, and $70 - $90 isn't out of the question.

I was going to recommend Temple Forks Outfitters, but it'd be hard to get a full set up for that.

Take a look at Cabela's and BassPro, see what they are selling kits for.  They won't be the best set-ups you'll ever have, but they are pretty good, more than good enough to get you going.

Take a look at what Sierra Trading Post has too.  They can be hit and miss, but sometimes you can score a great deal there.

...or you could go used, which is what I've done with a lot of my set-ups.  It's a bit more work, but you can get some great equipment at good prices that way.





 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Geoff Roznak

Take a look at these, at Sierra Trading Post:

https://www.sierra.com/scientific-anglers-species-specific-kit-bass-8wt-4-piece~p~15ytu/?filterString=fishing-rods~d~190%2F

 

https://www.sierra.com/wetfly-element-fly-rod-and-reel-combo-starter-kit-5wt-9-4-piece~p~585tp/?filterString=fishing-rods~d~190%2F

 

There's a whole "subculture" out there on smallie fly fishing - lots a really knowledgeable folks.  There's a lot of great books, if you're a reader, the best one, hands down is this one:

https://shop.tightlinesflyshop.com/smallmouth-modern-fly-fishing-methods-tactics-and.html

It's so good I recommend to to gear anglers.  It's available on Amazon as well, in both paper and Kindle versions, but I like to link it to the Tight Lines Fly Shop page - they are the guys that wrote it, and who live it every day, and I try to get them the sale without having to give Amazon a slice of the pie.

EDIT:

While I was noodling around on their site, I spotted this: https://shop.tightlinesflyshop.com/orvis-encounter-package.html
 

For $170, that'd be a great starter rig, and you could call them up, talk smallie-on-the-fly with them, get a copy of the book and a few flies (get some Ol' Mr. Wigglys).

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
shoot-straight

Wanted to add something. I would See if there is a local fly shop to you. They would be a good contact for a lesson, and then take a look at what they can offer. All the threads about losing small shops, we really should try and use them. If they have tying supplies, well that's even better- that's a whole new addiction you will likely need to address too. Orvis has shop dealers. setups usually cost the same in the shop as they do online. 

 

it's a good relationship to build that will help you long term.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm self-taught (to quote Pat McManus - "my flycasting style has been compared negatively to an old lady fighting off a bee with a broomstick") but I had my wife take a lesson with the local flyshop when we lived in KS rather than deal with the marital fallout from me trying to teach her. It was money well spent.

Plus you're supporting the locals, who both have the expertise, and can then have what you need when you need it.

 

I'd also pick out a starter rig, but for other reasons. My sons, on COVID-college hiatus this spring, decided they wanted to learn to flyfish (as kids, they were content teaching worms to swim, and then reeling in my catches on the flyrod). As a result, both my Orvis and Sage rods now seem to have been appropriated by new owners... I guess theoretically, that means I could buy a new one for me?

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Geoff Roznak
1 hour ago, Lurch said:

...both my Orvis and Sage rods now seem to have been appropriated by new owners... I guess theoretically, that means I could buy a new one for me?

Absolutely!  Best start shopping now so that you have your own rod again by the time the weather warms up. 😉

Link to post
Share on other sites
Jalinkly

Thanks for all the great input.  I have learned that a lesson or two is the way to go and have a reputable fly shop nearby, the owner of which, is a grouse and woodcock hunter, member of RGS, and hunting dog owner.  Never thought to search about lessons but have since inquired on internet and they offer them. 
 

Had been looking at outfits on Cabelas on sale but lots of reviews said rod tips were fragile.  If I’m gonna take lessons, I’ll probably buy from his shop if happy with instruction and service.  Don’t mind paying a little more for knowledge and just to support local businesses.  
 

I must admit though, I can be cheap but live by the motto of “Buy once, cry once” when it comes to the important stuff. 
 

Thanks for all comments. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...