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Dave in Maine
2 hours ago, Mike da Carpenter said:


Work with a guy who says that when dealing with road kill, as long as the legs haven’t achieved “Lift off”, then the meat is usually good.  I don’t eat the chili he brings in.

When he talks about the "legs achiev[ing] 'lift off'" is he talking about (a) one of the legs pointing into the air as the carcass bloats, or (b) when you try to pick up the carcass by the leg, the leg "lifts off"?

 

Inquiring minds want to know.

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Brad Eden

I had to leave the first deer, a doe, that I ever shot with a bow, overnight. Shot her from a stool watching a field. I was a novice and when I didn’t find blood as darkness fell I backed out. This was during the early September management season. It was warm. Early the next morning I found her not far from where she entered the woods, dead with the broadhead lodged in her heart. She wasn’t bloated but on the way, and when I opened her up she was a little funky. I brought her to the meat processor I used back then and he looked her over and said “I’ll eat her if you won’t”. The only thing tainted and basically inedible were the inner/tenderloins. Everything else was fine eating. A road kill button buck I found last winter was outstanding eating. The sort of good thing is it was still alive when I found it, and after a call to the warden I popped it behind the ear with the .25 I carry in my truck and put it down. Most of the time it’s the impact from the vehicle that ruins meat if you can get to the deer fast enough.

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Mike da Carpenter
41 minutes ago, Dave in Maine said:

When he talks about the "legs achiev[ing] 'lift off'" is he talking about (a) one of the legs pointing into the air as the carcass bloats, or (b) when you try to pick up the carcass by the leg, the leg "lifts off"?

 

Inquiring minds want to know.


He is speaking of (a) but option (b) is fricken hilarious and one that I will remember.

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Dave in Maine
18 minutes ago, browndrake said:

How bad can a couple days out in the cold be?  Dr. Dale Guthrie and team had a dinner of 36,000-50,000 year old bison and lived to tell about it.

https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/ancient-bison-stew-blue-babe-alaska

Just because you "can" do something does not necessarily mean you "should".  Tell me how many times I heard that....

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23 hours ago, MAArcher said:

I usually have my deer frozen within 12 hours of shooting them, but I was real lazy with the last one and it hung in the garage for a week and a half.  Then a back strap sat in the meat drawer for another week.  I cooked it up an hour ago and my son just said it was the best he’s ever had.  He’s 18 and has eaten venison his whole life.  He never even had a beef steak until he was 15 years old.  That has me thinking maybe I should go back to dry aging instead of wet aging.

We hang deer for up to two weeks with the hides on. Never had a bad one. 

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I shot a small buck about 3 years ago in the evening in the lungs and it ran off in the brush.  Went looking and couldn't find it and went back to get a flashlight and looked for another hour and still didn't find it.  Next morning at dawn I was back and found the blood trail.   Deer had only gone 75 yards and found him in thick brush.  Temp that night was 23 degrees and I figured fine.   Took the deer to the dressing rack (we don't field dress in the field because of bears and yotes).   Opened up the chest cavity and the smell was just funky.   Went ahead and took it to the processor and told them about what had happened.   They said it should be fine.   Next day they called and said they recommend the deer be thrown away.  Said when they actually went in and starting cutting it up it had a peculiar smell.   I took their advise and that was that.  That was the last time I shot a deer at dusk.  

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Brad Eden
4 minutes ago, tut said:

I shot a small buck about 3 years ago in the evening in the lungs and it ran off in the brush.  Went looking and couldn't find it and went back to get a flashlight and looked for another hour and still didn't find it.  Next morning at dawn I was back and found the blood trail.   Deer had only gone 75 yards and found him in thick brush.  Temp that night was 23 degrees and I figured fine.   Took the deer to the dressing rack (we don't field dress in the field because of bears and yotes).   Opened up the chest cavity and the smell was just funky.   Went ahead and took it to the processor and told them about what had happened.   They said it should be fine.   Next day they called and said they recommend the deer be thrown away.  Said when they actually went in and starting cutting it up it had a peculiar smell.   I took their advise and that was that.  That was the last time I shot a deer at dusk.  


At 23°, it should have been fine, that seems highly unusual. I have to think something else was going on with that deer. 
 

I love killing deer in the morning. So relaxing, time to blood trail if needed, time to take photos, field dress, drag, tag, hang....but I don’t see enough deer in a Maine to restrict myself to mornings. So I’ll hopefully be unzipping many deer to come in the dark with a headlamp or a flashlight clenched between my teeth.🙂  

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19 minutes ago, Brad Eden said:


At 23°, it should have been fine, that seems highly unusual. I have to think something else was going on with that deer. 
 

I love killing deer in the morning. So relaxing, time to blood trail if needed, time to take photos, field dress, drag, tag, hang....but I don’t see enough deer in a Maine to restrict myself to mornings. So I’ll hopefully be unzipping many deer to come in the dark with a headlamp or a flashlight clenched between my teeth.🙂  

 

The processor said they believed that the lung shot fractured a rib bone and that rib bone fragment may have punctured the stomach and stomach juices had flowed thru the deer chest cavity and those juices had worked their way into the meat somehow.  As a recall the insides were a bit slimy when opened up, but the smell was what got me.  Hard to describe, but not normal and I've dressed a pile of deer.  Shame, as it was a nice deer for sure.    PS.  Yep, we had other things going on at the farm that year causing issues.  Think that was the year we found some deer dead from Hemorrhagic disease. 

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Recoil Rob

I was alone when I shot my first deer. Brought it right to a friends house to hang on his meat pole planning to come back the next day. Temps dropped overnight and stayed there for about 10 days, that deer was frozen solid.

Finally decided to go get him, I put him in trunk of my 74 Valiant but couldn't close the lid because the frozen legs were splayed.

Wise guy rookie cop pulls me over, looks at all my permits, tags license and then starts grilling me about where exactly I shot it. He was looking for me to burn the area. I mentioned that if he really wanted to push the issue he should take it up with the guys who got me in the area to begin with, the local police chief and his top detective. He went away.

I got the deer home and put it on a picnic table in the yard and waited until the sun warmed the skin enough to peel off and then basically sawed it up with a meat saw.

My first deer, tasted great.

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