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2021 Hunting VIDEOS: Post 'em Here!


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On 4/10/2021 at 8:17 PM, Payton said:

Scar, what's Dot's breeding?

 

 

 

Sorry, I just saw this.

 

Dot's Sire is Erin's Redrum.

Dot's Dam is Erin's Moneymaker.

 

She's a super sweet little dog.  Perhaps a bit too soft for a pointer.  She came with tons of inherent standstill and is super bird crazy.  I've let her drift away from her initial staunchness but am going to work on that this summer.  As you can tell from my videos I don't worry too much about a dog that moves, or relocates, after the initial point because our birds run so much.  I do place a premium on a dog that is smart about how they handle their bird contacts and Dot needs to continue to work on that a bit.

 

She compares favorably with every other pointer I walked behind these past two years.

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For anyone wanting to "shoot" their birds with their phone or perhaps video a friend shooting or a friend video taping you shooting a bird, post 'em here! As for me, I'm completely satisfied videoing

Tried something a little different with this video.  I hope it's enjoyable.

Go-pro video of something a bit unusual for our neck of the woods. My dog was on point, and as I made my way over to him I flushed a cotton-tail rabbit, a very, very rare beast in the parts we usually

4 hours ago, Scar said:

 

Sorry, I just saw this.

 

Dot's Sire is Erin's Redrum.

Dot's Dam is Erin's Moneymaker.

 

She's a super sweet little dog.  Perhaps a bit too soft for a pointer.  She came with tons of inherent standstill and is super bird crazy.  I've let her drift away from her initial staunchness but am going to work on that this summer.  As you can tell from my videos I don't worry too much about a dog that moves, or relocates, after the initial point because our birds run so much.  I do place a premium on a dog that is smart about how they handle their bird contacts and Dot needs to continue to work on that a bit.

 

She compares favorably with every other pointer I walked behind these past two years.

I see that Redrum is fairly close to Elhew Sinbad. I had a Sinbad pup that had so much of that "standstill" as you say that I didn't know if I'd ever get her broke to the gun because I like to shoot when dogs chase and SHE WOULDN'T CHASE! 

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17 hours ago, Payton said:

I see that Redrum is fairly close to Elhew Sinbad. I had a Sinbad pup that had so much of that "standstill" as you say that I didn't know if I'd ever get her broke to the gun because I like to shoot when dogs chase and SHE WOULDN'T CHASE! 

 

Dot is much that way.  If you watch her in the videos she stands through the flush and shot most times.  I haven't worked on her being steady to wing and/or shot but she undoubtedly would take to it easily.  Now if I can just get her to quit taking a step or two after establishing her point.  If you watch in the Two for Tennessee video you can see her footprints on the two-track as I walk in on her point.  She'd clearly walked at least 15 feet along the edge of that road after initially establishing point.  We're going to work on getting her more staunch this summer but I anticipate I'll lose most of that through the season next year.  It really doesn't bother me that she wants to handle the birds a bit so long as she learns to do so wisely.  She still struggles with pushing a covey more than I would like.  Time afield and some light instruction should improve that over the years.

 

I'll repost the video with it set to begin at 0:24 so you can see what I'm talking about.  I hope it works.

 

 

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7 hours ago, Scar said:

 

Dot is much that way.  If you watch her in the videos she stands through the flush and shot most times.  I haven't worked on her being steady to wing and/or shot but she undoubtedly would take to it easily.  Now if I can just get her to quit taking a step or two after establishing her point.  If you watch in the Two for Tennessee video you can see her footprints on the two-track as I walk in on her point.  She'd clearly walked at least 15 feet along the edge of that road after initially establishing point.  We're going to work on getting her more staunch this summer but I anticipate I'll lose most of that through the season next year.  It really doesn't bother me that she wants to handle the birds a bit so long as she learns to do so wisely.  She still struggles with pushing a covey more than I would like.  Time afield and some light instruction should improve that over the years.

 

I'll repost the video with it set to begin at 0:24 so you can see what I'm talking about.  I hope it works.

 

Maybe I'm being too generous, but if a dog takes 1-2 steps (and NOT moving all four), then I normally attribute it the dog just getting a little more comfortable from where they probably stopped in an awkward position. For dogs that like to creep, I'm a huge fan of the belly band (ecollar around the waist). And what's powerful about that is that you can nick your dog on low levels without ever saying anything to your dog and your buddies will never know  :D  You can also nick a dog for as far as you can see one if you had a bonified creeper. But after a dog has communicated to me that they're "honest" (meaning that they don't want to flush the birds, and if they do, it was simply a mistake or very wary/skittish birds), then I let them break when they want because they may have just figured out "I was wrong. I NOW think that there are no birds here and they've moved on."

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14 hours ago, Payton said:

Maybe I'm being too generous, but if a dog takes 1-2 steps (and NOT moving all four), then I normally attribute it the dog just getting a little more comfortable from where they probably stopped in an awkward position. For dogs that like to creep, I'm a huge fan of the belly band (ecollar around the waist). And what's powerful about that is that you can nick your dog on low levels without ever saying anything to your dog and your buddies will never know  :D  You can also nick a dog for as far as you can see one if you had a bonified creeper. But after a dog has communicated to me that they're "honest" (meaning that they don't want to flush the birds, and if they do, it was simply a mistake or very wary/skittish birds), then I let them break when they want because they may have just figured out "I was wrong. I NOW think that there are no birds here and they've moved on."

 

My Ellie Mae, by your definition, is "honest" on birds.  She frequently moves on point and, rarely, accidentally flushes a covey.  I feel no need to correct her but instead just appreciate that she allows me to participate.  This Track Star video shows her, and Brent's Maddie, tag-teaming a running covey in sparse sage cover this winter.  Dot's not there yet.  She moves on birds for selfish reasons (likely wants to see them) but time, experience and some light training should bring her along quite nicely.

 

 

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Allen McCallie
On 4/13/2021 at 9:13 PM, Payton said:

Maybe I'm being too generous, but if a dog takes 1-2 steps (and NOT moving all four), then I normally attribute it the dog just getting a little more comfortable from where they probably stopped in an awkward position. For dogs that like to creep, I'm a huge fan of the belly band (ecollar around the waist). And what's powerful about that is that you can nick your dog on low levels without ever saying anything to your dog and your buddies will never know  :D  You can also nick a dog for as far as you can see one if you had a bonified creeper. But after a dog has communicated to me that they're "honest" (meaning that they don't want to flush the birds, and if they do, it was simply a mistake or very wary/skittish birds), then I let them break when they want because they may have just figured out "I was wrong. I NOW think that there are no birds here and they've moved on."

 

Dot handles her birds exactly the way I like, and my pulse elevates every time I see such dog work, but what really stands out in the video is the extraordinary marksmanship....

 

We'll say nothing about the next four points.

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  • 5 weeks later...
spring

It's great time of year as Gentleman Bob searches for love.  Quail are whistling all around, and when a hen gives a sultry response, those hoodlum roosters get as fired up as a 9th grader seeing Prom night cleavage.

As sunset approached, I went back to a spot on my farm where I have an old syrup kettle for fires.  Fed the dogs while there and popped a cool one.  It was hard to eventually leave as Gent'man Bob continued his serenade. 

 

 

 

 

Some whistling while wandering:

 

 

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  • 1 month later...

 

Tried something a little different with this video.  I hope it's enjoyable.

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spring
10 hours ago, Scar said:

 

Tried something a little different with this video.  I hope it's enjoyable.

 

Well done! Needed that on a hot July morning....   :)

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  • 5 weeks later...

 

 

I'm still slowly going through last season's footage.  This kid keeps the ammo manufacturer's happy!

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Andi's pigeon workout 8 07 2021 - YouTube

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=37EXBfN_9x4

 

Here's a workout from an unusually cool August day last weekend. I just got a GoPro and was playing around with it. I mistakenly referred to her as 20 months. She's 22 months old (whelped in October).

 

P.S. I tried two different ways of embedding the link and didn't have luck with either one :(

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TEST

 

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/N_YHOLErx20" title="YouTube video player" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen></iframe>

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