Jump to content

Electric collar recommendation


Recommended Posts

Hi all y'all,

 

I'm having trouble keeping my golden retriever flushing dog reined in. Trace is 6 years old yet he's very immature. It's like he's 6 years old going on 1. He's extremely friendly, both with people and other dogs. If a dog gets aggressive with him he just backs off and leaves. He's definitely not an alpha dog.

 

Trace is whistle trained to come with two short toots and to sit with one toot. He also has an excellent nose and a strong prey drive. Unfortunately, he's great at flushing quail +50 yards out! I'm looking for a simple way to cure him of that annoying habit. My thoughts are is to put an electric collar on him that will first vibrate or beep at 20 yards and then give him a light stimulation if he goes farther out.

 

Trace is familiar with electric collars from his previous owner who trained him as a field trials dog so I'm not worried about any mental trauma from the very mild stimulation I have planned.

 

He's not bad with sharptails and pheasant, though reining him in closer would help there too.

 

Could someone here be kind enough to recommend a suitable collar for what I have planned. Preferably not an overly expensive collar.

 

I'm no dog trainer by anyone's imagination. I'm simply looking for a simple way to cure his one really bad habit.

 

Steve

Link to post
Share on other sites
Hal Standish

A couple of questions. Is your Trace dog a dog you sent out for retriever training or was he a dog you acquired as a started retriever?  How long have owned Trace?

You say Trace is "trained" to come with two short toots and to sit with one toot. When your hunting Trace does he behave this way to whistle or does he just blow you off and continue to run out of control?

 

This as close to the basic Dogtra collar I started with in 1990. It has all of the basic function needed. Nick or momentary stimulus, as my memory serves it hits the dog with a shock stimulator for 1/1000 of second. Continuous shocking simulator for up to 8 seconds and a Page unit which vibrates only.

There are many ways to find this collar on line. One I provided is just one example.

 

 

https://www.lcsupply.com/products/dogtra-iq-remote-trainer-collar?variant=26664249032804&gclid=Cj0KCQiA6Or_BRC_ARIsAPzuer8t35cW2yTqskqmhOoDjG98_vuZ6_HC5JJVdd1VJxm-VKhcL85mphQaAhF3EALw_wcB

Link to post
Share on other sites
Jim Vander

To my hand the tritronics pro series is natural if you have not owned a collar before thats likely moot though I would go with Tritronics or Dogtra. While I dont use tone much its useful but be sure has momentary and continuous. You mentioned him being trained as a field trial dog and if thats the case bear in mine he has been trained to go and go hard.Trials are won and lost on distant marks and blinds.  Be sure you are fair in training him on your expectations on gun range before you start making corrections.Hal's questions above apply.  Likewise it would be a service to you both to understand collar basics to insure you don't create confusion and get in sync as to correction levels. You don't say much about your experience, have you trained a retriever to upland hunt? Done well its something you will both enjoy throughout his career. You don't want this to be mechanical if your constantly whistling and correcting  its a misery to you and other hunters and if your a pheasant hunter you will alerts every bird for hundreds of yards. This matters,  done badly with a collar you can reduce many dogs to a boot licker and thats ver hard to recover from. Tell us more?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I’d get a garmin pro 70 (the lighted collars they have is a fantastic safety feature after dark near roads )

 

then train him to “hup” which means sit until released on one toot (which he already is) you just don’t have a way of enforcing it

 

I always released with two toots but that’s not going to work so just use a verbal “Ok” to release him when you catch up to him 

 

that’s the simplest way and he already knows half of it

 

a cheap collar or is a mistake buy once cry once and be done with it they usually come on sale around this time of year

Link to post
Share on other sites

I knew when I wrote this I'd get questions regarding my “experience” so I'll answer them now.

 

I trained my last golden myself. At the time I was living in Illinois, self employed, and could afford to work the dog with lots of birds. It helped that I lived close to a state run pheasant concession as well as the outfit that supplied the birds. During the season we'd “hunt” pen-raised birds at the state concession and off-season I'd buy birds at the pheasant farm and plant them myself. I also took the dog out hunting wild birds, mostly in Iowa. She wasn't the best trained dog but I shot far more birds with her than without her so I was generally satisfied. BTW, she was a helluva good retriever! As far as Trace is concerned I'm now retired and live on SS. I simply can't afford to train Trace like I did my last dog.

 

My desire for wanting to keep Trace within 20-25 yards is two-fold. To stay in shape I hike a lot. During my hikes I've run into packs of javelinas and coyotes, black bears, and mountain lions. All those critter's would be more than happy to hurt and/or eat Trace given the opportunity. When I hike I'm usually armed with bear spray and/or a small handgun, neither of which is much help if Trace is too far away. The other reason is of course for bird hunting.

 

I'll check into the collar recommendations. As for this seasons hunting, SE Arizona is in the midst of a severe drought and even though the season runs until mid-February. My last years license expired 12/31/20 and  I'm not sure if I want to waste my money on a license this year.

 

Steve

Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...