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ATbuckhunter

When do you guys start introducing birds to dogs? I have a couple pheasant wings in the freezer from a couple years ago that im thinking about giving to my pup. What do you guys think?

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Not sure about giving him a wing. How old is the pup & how long have you had him?

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Keep the wings in the freezer. Start him out on quail. Real birds trump wings any time.

Wing are for shock and awe a dog and pony show for some breeders and trainers.

Put a quail in a harness on a string for a few times to get pup excited.

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16 minutes ago, grouse28 said:

Keep the wings in the freezer. Start him out on quail. Real birds trump wings any time.

Wing are for shock and awe a dog and pony show for some breeders and trainers.

Put a quail in a harness on a string for a few times to get pup excited.

This basically what I was taught.

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marysburg

If you don't have quail available, wing locked pigeons can be very exciting for a pup, or a wing taped pigeon works too.  Not so much fun for the pigeon, but it will really light up the pup.

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Hal Standish
9 hours ago, ATbuckhunter said:

When do you guys start introducing birds to dogs? I have a couple pheasant wings in the freezer from a couple years ago that im thinking about giving to my pup. What do you guys think?

Oh now I see This is the mouthing puppy from and earlier thread. Finish crate braking and house training first and formost. These are very traumatic times for a pup leaving the the litter nest and his mates and trying to adjust to being the only dog in a land of humans. Pointing dog or Flushing dog the approach changes if we know this fact about the pup.

 Remind us here, is this a pointing dog or a flushing dog, you have? and approximate age of this pup would be nice also?

In my 35 yrs of training i never used a wing. I have used cold deads, warm deads clip winged birds and full wing flyers for introductory purpose's. The style and age of dog was my guide on what type of target bird I used in my introduction.  Introductory work is some thing I take quite serious. it is the foundation for all of the advance work you may be interested in doing latter on. Depending on your standards. Your standards are your guide to developing this pup.

 

 

Hal

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Treerooster

I've always called it a "Maypole". Pigeon (or quail) on a string. Really pumps up pup's bird desire IME.

 

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I don't do it a lot. 2 or 3 times is enough spread out over a few weeks when pup is pretty young.

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I agree with Hal.  You said in your other thread the pup is 9 weeks old.  That's a little young.  There's plenty of other stuff to work on first.  Coturnix quail make good intro birds when you are ready for the bird intro.  They're smaller and less likely to scare a pup.  Most of them don't really fly either.  They are also cheap and don't require any sort of license to buy like game birds because they are classified as poultry in most states.

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ATbuckhunter
4 hours ago, Hal Standish said:

Oh now I see This is the mouthing puppy from and earlier thread. Finish crate braking and house training first and formost. These are very traumatic times for a pup leaving the the litter nest and his mates and trying to adjust to being the only dog in a land of humans. Pointing dog or Flushing dog the approach changes if we know this fact about the pup.

 Remind us here, is this a pointing dog or a flushing dog, you have? and approximate age of this pup would be nice also?

In my 35 yrs of training i never used a wing. I have used cold deads, warm deads clip winged birds and full wing flyers for introductory purpose's. The style and age of dog was my guide on what type of target bird I used in my introduction.  Introductory work is some thing I take quite serious. it is the foundation for all of the advance work you may be interested in doing latter on. Depending on your standards. Your standards are your guide to developing this pup.

 

 

Hal

She’s approximately 10 weeks old at this point and she is a pointer (small munsterlander). I’ll definitely focus on crate training and house breaking. I just didn’t want to miss any good windows for bird introduction. On a walk a few days ago there were doves in the side walk, but she didn’t show much interest so I got a little worried. Now I don’t think she saw them, so maybe not a big deal? I apologize in advance for all the stupid questions I’ll be asking this forum. Obviously I’m very very knew to this. Thanks for the help!

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Having a new pup gives me anxiety!  I was without a bird dog for 11 years when we got a pup, a Deutsch Langhaar. I was a mess, worrying about birds, intro to guns, etc.

 

She was 10 weeks and I took her to a NAVHDA day. The guys were nice but thought I was insane for having driven 1 hour with a dog that young where they would be shooting. I hindsight, it was embarrassing. I was so wound up about making a bird dog, I almost forgot to enjoy the pup. 

 

Fast forward a couple months and our morning walks took forever because she was sight pointing everything that crossed her path.


Almost two years later, I’m getting ready to do the puppy thing again...and I’m already nervous!

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Bird_Man_mike

Live quail will get her going, but she is very young for that.  Just let her play and work on her confidence out on your walks together then introduce some planted quail in a couple months.   Find some live ones raised for food or eggs that arent in a flight pen - they wont fly and will hold exactly where you place them so you can put them in random spots and then go get the pup.  Theyll jump a few feet when bumped which Im sure will excite your pup.  I would not worry about her instinct at this point - Ill bet after you help her find the first quail shell be all in.   

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No stupid questions, first pups are always daunting.

It is a balance of being firm or easy with a pup depending upon the pups temperament.

What you do now will be imprinted.

Work on basic obedience at this point for a few weeks, heel, stay or whoa.

Let her be a pup for awhile.

 

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Ray Gubernat

AT - 

 

Everyone does it a little different when it comes to training a bird dog.  

 

I personally do not show my pups any birds...well maybe just one, when the pup is about four months old...just to make sure its head is screwed on straight.  

 

I do not like to make work for myself and I definitely do not like to teach a puppy something I am going to have to train out or train around later.  

 

The puppies I buy come out of the birth canal with more drive and desire to find birds than anybody could need...so there is absolutely no reason to fire them up around birds.  In fact...the exact opposite is what I aim for.  I want a dog to stand there, tall and proud...but... under control.

 

There ARE some strains and breeds of dogs that...  simply put...do not have all the desire to find birds that one would like.    Those pups can benefit from getting fired up and chasing and such.  I see you have a shorthair pup.  It is quite likely that your puppy is field bred and  has all the fire and desire you can use.  Any chasing and firing up will probably be more for you than for the dog.   

 

That is all good... but just remember... what you allow...you encourage. We are training the puppy every single time we interact with it, so allowing a pup to chase birds, instead of pointing them is something you will, most likely have to have the pup UNlearn later on.

 

I do the yardwork, teaching the pup to come when called, heel and whoa on leash and eventually off leash, style the dog up on a bench and get it to stand tall and proud.  I start the "come" portion of the training as soon as I have the pup.  The heel/whoa portion I typically start when the pup is 4 months old and this all continues in the yard until the pup is six to eight months old.  Once the brakes and steering are installed(come and whoa) i will run the pup in birdless fields to ingrain those responses.  

 

When I introduce birds, the youngster is typically 9-12 months old, and i do that in a controlled situation, with launchers and pigeons, or good flying chuckar.  The youngster is on a checkcord.    My dogs are NEVER allowed to chase...because if I allow it...I have to train them to NOT chase down the road.  

 

However, the most important thing is to bond with your youngster and get him to like you and want to be with you.  Have fun with the pup and he will have fun with you.

 

RayG

 

 

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Hal Standish
17 hours ago, Ray Gubernat said:

AT - 

 

Everyone does it a little different when it comes to training a bird dog.  

 

I personally do not show my pups any birds...well maybe just one, when the pup is about four months old...just to make sure its head is screwed on straight.  

 

I do not like to make work for myself and I definitely do not like to teach a puppy something I am going to have to train out or train around later.  

 

The puppies I buy come out of the birth canal with more drive and desire to find birds than anybody could need...so there is absolutely no reason to fire them up around birds.  In fact...the exact opposite is what I aim for.  I want a dog to stand there, tall and proud...but... under control.

 

There ARE some strains and breeds of dogs that...  simply put...do not have all the desire to find birds that one would like.    Those pups can benefit from getting fired up and chasing and such.  I see you have a shorthair pup.  It is quite likely that your puppy is field bred and  has all the fire and desire you can use.  Any chasing and firing up will probably be more for you than for the dog.   

 

That is all good... but just remember... what you allow...you encourage. We are training the puppy every single time we interact with it, so allowing a pup to chase birds, instead of pointing them is something you will, most likely have to have the pup UNlearn later on.

 

I do the yardwork, teaching the pup to come when called, heel and whoa on leash and eventually off leash, style the dog up on a bench and get it to stand tall and proud.  I start the "come" portion of the training as soon as I have the pup.  The heel/whoa portion I typically start when the pup is 4 months old and this all continues in the yard until the pup is six to eight months old.  Once the brakes and steering are installed(come and whoa) i will run the pup in birdless fields to ingrain those responses.  

 

When I introduce birds, the youngster is typically 9-12 months old, and i do that in a controlled situation, with launchers and pigeons, or good flying chuckar.  The youngster is on a checkcord.    My dogs are NEVER allowed to chase...because if I allow it...I have to train them to NOT chase down the road.  

 

However, the most important thing is to bond with your youngster and get him to like you and want to be with you.  Have fun with the pup and he will have fun with you.

 

RayG

 

 

 

 

Very well said Ray! Ray provides some real pearls in this post RE Read the underline portion of Rays post. It is most important not to push the pup ahead with out of control bird exposure. A little goes a long way

Hal

 

 

 

On 1/14/2021 at 9:11 PM, ATbuckhunter said:

When do you guys start introducing birds to dogs? I have a couple pheasant wings in the freezer from a couple years ago that im thinking about giving to my pup. What do you guys think?

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

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