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cut ear advice for the field -- styptic powder? something else?


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boon hogganbeck

What do you guys do in the field to fix a badly cut ear?  Does styptic powder work well?  I carry a First Aid kit w/ gauze, hemostats, and EMT gel, but that didn't help me yesterday.

 

(...in the woods yesterday, my pup tore the tip of his ear on piece of wire or something. Heard him yelp about 70 yards out.  He came back and bled all over us like the proverbial stuck pig. Just gushing. Of course we were a mile from the truck.  I carry a First Aid kit but nothing seemed to work.  Got him home and tried gauze and pressure on both sides, then cold wet cloth, then EMT gel, then corn starch... After an hour of fussing with him, I ended up taking him to the animal hospital and they couldn't get it stopped either, and they had to stitch him up.)

 

Thanks for any advice.

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VizslavsBird

Leg out of a pair of women's hose just big enough to slip over dogs head.  EMT gel on wound, gauze and slid hose over head to keep the ear immobile during head shake.

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I have always wondered about using a product like QuickClot or Bleed Stop on a dog to stop severe bleeding, but have never heard of anyone doing it.  Maybe one of our veterinarian members can shed some light of the safety of that.  I keep styptic powder and a skin stapler in my first aid kit for bleeding.  I've only ever used the powder on small cuts and damaged nails and it seems to work well, but I'm not sure how you would staple an ear.    

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4 hours ago, VizslavsBird said:

Leg out of a pair of women's hose just big enough to slip over dogs head.  EMT gel on wound, gauze and slid hose over head to keep the ear immobile during head shake.

I'd like to add that before sliding that piece of hose on the head you want to flop the injured ear onto the top of the dogs head, then apply the piece of hose.  You want to trap the injured ear on top of the head thus taking gravity out of the equation to stop the bleeding.  I usually clean the cut a little and smear a small glob of EMT gel on the wound first.  It usually works pretty well.

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boon hogganbeck

Thanks for the advice.  The vet did a head wrap in that style, so I can see how you'd use panty-hose and gauze  to do it.   

 

I did not expect to have to carry panty hose  around in my  hunting vest, but I've certainly done stranger things...

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Ray Gubernat

I've done something similar with EMT gel and Vetwrap.  I carry  roll of the stuff with me most of the time.  Ears bleed like crazy, especially when the dog shakes its head.  Nasty.

 

RayG

 

 

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Styptic Powder works great but I usually do it after the hunt. IF you want to isolate the ear, cut off the foot of a sock and use the open elastic sleeve to go over the dogs head. Will help to stop the headshake.

 

Quckclot pads are awesome but a bit expensive for chronic ear cuts in woodcock country.

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After telling a hunting buddy about one of my dogs getting a ear hung up an a barbed wire fence and split it the full length of the ear about 2 miles from the pickup he shared the panty hose method. At the time of the hang up I didn't carry pantyhose in my vest(do now) but I have carried styptic powder with me for years in the field. So I washed the ear with a small amount of saline, then coated with styptic powder, a layer of gauze and a whole roll of vet wrap with the ear folded over the top of the head. Decided I didn't want to be cleaning blood off the walls and ceilings at home waiting for it to heal so we went straight to the vet. Vet said this was the best shape she had seen a dog come in with a split ear and one of the worst split ears she had seen. 

The dog pointed a covey and retrieved a hun with the wrap on his head.

 

I have also heard that stuffing a bird in the leg of panty hose can be a good way to carry one around in your vest if you might want to get mounted.     

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co_setter
On 1/19/2021 at 12:38 PM, boon hogganbeck said:

Thanks for the advice.  The vet did a head wrap in that style, so I can see how you'd use panty-hose and gauze  to do it.   

 

I did not expect to have to carry panty hose  around in my  hunting vest, but I've certainly done stranger things...

That leads into the story of the guy at the gym who noticed his buddy was wearing women's underwear.  When he asked how long this was going on, the response was -

 

 

"ever since my wife found them in the glove box"

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If the dog can shake it's head nothing will stem the bleeding.  I used this on Clancy .  No Flap Ear Wrap 

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Worked , with  emt gel but took weeks. The dog cannot be allowed shake its ears or the bleeding will keep occurring .

 

This didn’t work.

 

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used this in the field. Worked while hunting. 

 

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Bleeding ears are tough to deal with.

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VizslavsBird

Every time there is a snagged pair of hose they get washed and put in the hunting dungeon.  My dogs dont get near as upset about snags as the bride.

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  • 2 weeks later...
Urban_Redneck

I have used celox clotting powder in the field, it's important to rinse it away when you are able to dress the wound properly.

 

I do carry a Quick Clot bandage in my vest, it's probably overkill for the typical cut ear.

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  • 3 weeks later...

In a pinch wipe of rub some dirt on cut stop bleeding when get back truck clean antiseptic put some Emt gel on it 

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