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.22 Pistol As Blank Gun?


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Anyone use a .22 for their blank gun? If so, what blanks do you use? I'm looking for something loud and, preferably, reasonably priced.

 

I've been using the 4th strongest (yellow coded, I think) Ramset cartridges from Home Depot (100 for ~$8). They're both loud and cheap, but they expand when fired and ejecting them becomes a bit of a chore.

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I use the ram sets in a NEF starter pistol. For most training, I use the green #3 ram sets for much of my training and the yellow #4's for field trials. Technically, not legal but many many trialers have gone to using them.

 

The #4's do stick in the cylinder. I have a small torx srcewdriver that I use to get them out of the cylinder. That spares the cylinder rod from that duty.

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Craig Doherty

I use a 22 much of the time -- I don't see the importance of loud -- especially around young dogs -- and just buy the little 22 crimp blanks.

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I've used my old .22 Target Master rifle but with the last six pups have used a retriever trainer. I wanted to do gun intro, marking and retrieving at the same time. I use the ram sets and pull them out with a plier.

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Ray Gubernat

Currently I use  a 209 primer pistol, but I also have a 22 which I used in the past.    I typically bought the #2 loads. They are plenty loud and I don't recall having any real issues with the cases sticking.  

 

If you trial, the .22 acorn crimps  used to be allowed only for puppy in AKC.  Dunno now.  Haven't read the AKC regs on it in several years.  Dunno about usage in  hunt tests.

 

Be careful with open barrel weapons.  They are classed as firearms and also handguns and subject to local and state regulations.     Some states might have restrictions on them that will land you in trouble.  The solid barrel blank guns are NOT firearms according to the ATF and thus, not subject to those laws(except perhaps Canada).

 

RayG

Edited by Ray Gubernat
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4 hours ago, Ray Gubernat said:

Be careful with open barrel weapons.  They are classed as firearms and also handguns and subject to local and state regulations.     Some states might have restrictions on them that will land you in trouble.  The solid barrel blank guns are NOT firearms according to the ATF and thus, not subject to those laws(except perhaps Canada).

 

RayG

I've got one final hurdle then I'll have my concealed carry permit specifically for dog training.

 

 

4 hours ago, 406dn said:

The #4's do stick in the cylinder. I have a small torx srcewdriver that I use to get them out of the cylinder. That spares the cylinder rod from that duty.

So the 4's stick but the 3's don't? And regarding your torx, are you inserting it from the opposite side of the cylinder and pushing the spent round out?

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5 minutes ago, Payton said:

So the 4's stick but the 3's don't? And regarding your torx, are you inserting it from the opposite side of the cylinder and pushing the spent round out?

 

They both stick,,but the three's barely hang up. Yes, that is how I use the screwdriver.

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20 minutes ago, Payton said:

've got one final hurdle then I'll have my concealed carry permit specifically for dog training.


So.. your concealed carry permit is only good for dog training and not general carry? What state is that?

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12 minutes ago, grouse28 said:


So.. your concealed carry permit is only good for dog training and not general carry? What state is that?

I meant that I'm getting the concealed carry permit so that I can carry when I run dogs. I will probably never carry a gun for any other reason.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I found some .22LR with ratshot that I used this weekend. VERY loud, and of course, you have to be careful about where you fire but these too stuck. I put an allen wrench in with my pouch with blanks that I'll use to push out the spent cartridges. Talking with a friend of mine who knows guns and he suggested cleaning it :D  Novel idea which I hadn't done until yesterday, so perhaps the cleaning/lubing of the cylinders will solve the problem.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 2/9/2021 at 8:58 AM, Payton said:

I found some .22LR with ratshot that I used this weekend. VERY loud, and of course, you have to be careful about where you fire but these too stuck. I put an allen wrench in with my pouch with blanks that I'll use to push out the spent cartridges. Talking with a friend of mine who knows guns and he suggested cleaning it :D  Novel idea which I hadn't done until yesterday, so perhaps the cleaning/lubing of the cylinders will solve the problem.

green ramsets from home depot or lowes cheaper and safer.

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Greg Hartman

Just saw this.  FWIW, when doing firearm acclimatization training with a pup, I use a regular .22 handgun.  on't have or want a blank gun.  I start out holding the gun behind my back and fire one shot only when the pup is pretty far away and busy with something.  When I get to no reaction, I let the pup get closer, but don't let him/her see the gun to anticipate the shot.  Eventually, I get to where I am firing right over the dog and with full power .22's, letting him se the gun and firing several rounds in rapid fire.   After that, I move to a shotgun.  Any problems and we drop back a step or two.  The whole process usually takes me about two weeks, starting with an 8 week old pup and working on it every day.  Never had a gun shy dog.

 

I start out with CB Longs.  Not very loud, and (at least they used to be) cheap and readily available.  I like the longs because they are easier to handle than the tiny shorts or CB caps and are usually cheaper.  You can even use them in an auto if you hand-cycle the slide.  Then, when the pup is not reacting at all to the CB Longs, I move to regular long rifle ammo - usually the cheapest of all.

 

Obviously, you have to be careful when using live ammo, but that shouldn't be difficult for any experienced shooter.  Blanks and such are a PITA, expensive and usually muck up the handgun in one way or another.  

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5 hours ago, Greg Hartman said:

. . . and busy with something. 

I do something similar, but I want them to be VERY BUSY/EXCITED! I usually start releasing pigeons a few days before I actually begin the gunfire. In short order, they start to enjoy it and are chasing with great enthusiasm. I do like you which is to fire behind me and towards the ground to minimize the sound. The next step will be determined by how the first experience goes. 

 

And WATCH your dog's ears and tails. I've worked dogs with some owners and was surprised at how oblivious they were to their dog's reaction. Just because your dog didn't run back to you doesn't mean that they weren't negatively affected by the experience.

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On 2/9/2021 at 9:58 AM, Payton said:

Talking with a friend of mine who knows guns and he suggested cleaning it :D  Novel idea which I hadn't done until yesterday, so perhaps the cleaning/lubing of the cylinders will solve the problem.

I bird hunted today and used the yellow ramsets again AFTER cleaning the pistol. The spent shell still seized in the cylinder, but the solution is to use the allen wrench to push the shell out. There's no way I'll ever have more than 6 contacts in a day, so it's just a small inconvenience that's needed at most once per day.

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