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Question for pointy dog people.


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DD Huntress

When your dog is on point, can you call him off point or do you physically have to go get him. 

 

We live in the middle of nowhere.  Less than a hundred feet from our house we have thick growths of cedar trees and prairie grass. I have had to search for Barrett 3 times because he is stuck on point not far from the house but out of sight. He will not respond if I call. I have to find him and stomp around so he can see that whatever he was pointing has moved on. Obviously if he was wearing his GPS collar all the time this wouldn't be an issue. The sight of his collar brings high levels of excitement at the prospect of a hunt. I really don't want to have to resort to using it every time he goes outside.

 

Does anyone else have this problem? Can it be corrected? I mean he is actually doing his designated job but it's frustrating having to look for him.

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I have a command - "leave it" - that means get away from whatever thing or critter you are messing with right now.  I will use that command when I want to dog to just move on to other things.  My rele

We have one covert that I despise when Abby finds a bird in it.  Either Floyd or I, depending on whose turn it is from season to season, has to crawl in on hands and knees under the cat briers to flus

Yes it’s a pain in the A** but I look at it this way “ it’s the the dogs job to point and hold and my job to flush”.  These are my rules, if you can call your dog off of point and it does no harm, the

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Yes it’s a pain in the A** but I look at it this way “ it’s the the dogs job to point and hold and my job to flush”.  These are my rules, if you can call your dog off of point and it does no harm, then good for you. 

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Maybe have on a cheaper collar that beeps.  I have a Dogtra 2000T&B and i have my Pointer trained when I hit the button it means look for me as I’m looking for you.  I don’t use the beep function for anything else.  So even if my dog is pointing something stupid like a rabbit or robin she won’t come to voice command but will if I beep her.  Now if it’s a game bird and I beep she will still hold point or relocate.  But at least I know where she is and it’s worth flushing. 

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A dog certainly could have worse vices. In any case a command is a command and a recall or whoa are in my book, the most important ones. 

     I have for a very long time, trained my dogs to flush on command once I'm confident that steadiness is not a concern. Like many European hunters find this bit of training

very useful particularly hunting Grouse or Timber Doodles.

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If my dog goes on point they will not leave point. I’ll have to go get them but like Scott said. That’s what I want them to do. I’d personally never want a dog I could call off point. JMO

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SelbyLowndes

Over the years I've had a number of English Pointers who'd range out of sight and disappear for a while.  I presume they found something and were pointing.  I just hunted on and they always showed up when they heard some shooting.

 

Sometimes we'd just shoot up in the air to call them in.  Just part of the game far as I'm concerned...SelbyLowndes

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46 minutes ago, mccuha said:

If my dog goes on point they will not leave point. I’ll have to go get them but like Scott said. That’s what I want them to do. I’d personally never want a dog I could call off point. JMO

And when you get a dog that's out on a hassock that's surrounded by flooded marsh with lots of half buried branches, sticks and varied depths of water over some smelly soft silt and mixed areas of grease like clay. I've taken spills in places exactly as I depicted. There are quite a few areas like this in Central Wisconsin and Cedar Swamps

Up Nort are places that can hold birds when otherwise you can't hardly buy a fair shot at one. There are many times and situations where you Need a dog to break point.

The use of a Whistle that you blow in a certain manner, (Trill, Three or four blasts, a electronic buzzer as mentioned before) that the dog can learn as a imperative command.

No big deal one hell of a lot of us are already doing it with our training collars to begin with. If your dog is that intense on point you are not going to ruin him/her by teaching them to break off point on your command. I've been out with an old friend whose dog was super intense pointing a skunk and ended the days hunt because the dog didn't obey "Leave It" Another blew a Versatile Champion title when he locked up on a dead duck during the water work and the handler had to walk way to hell around a quite good sized pond complete with deep swampy mud shore along the way to the dog. Trust me It's a good thing to teach your dog. 

     In a few of the Hunt Test systems you learn that if you loose sight of your dog and it does not respond stop calling and go find your dog. It might be pointing game.

The judges make the determination as to docking points on obedience. You see the dog could be pointing a dead animal, a hot spot, a none game animal and possibly a dangerous one. You see an obedient dog will likely come back to you and if given the chance and is allowed to, lead you back to the area it was showing the presence of game.

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Greg Hartman

I have a command - "leave it" - that means get away from whatever thing or critter you are messing with right now.  I will use that command when I want to dog to just move on to other things.  My release command is "let's go!".  I'll use that if I know a bird is still around but has moved off from under the point and I want to dog to track it down and point again.  To my frustration, these commands don't always work from a distance when there is an intense point - the Great Montana Porcupine Incident last fall being a perfect example.  They work almost all the time if I am close to the dog.

 

Once a dog knows his/her job and holds a staunch point, I don't think introducing such commands is harmful in any way.

 

I'm no expert, so take my advice with a grain of salt, DDH.

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Mine just stay there until I get there or the bird leaves.  I never attempted to train to call them off a point.

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Mike da Carpenter

If a bird is still present, he will remain on point.  I have a release command and when I give it and he “stays”, I know there is still a bird there.  If he breaks point when I give the command, we are assured the bird has left.

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doodlecrazy
1 minute ago, Mike da Carpenter said:

If a bird is still present, he will remain on point.  I have a release command and when I give it and he “stays”, I know there is still a bird there.  If he breaks point when I give the command, we are assured the bird has left.

Same

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DD Huntress
42 minutes ago, Greg Hartman said:

I have a command - "leave it" - that means get away from whatever thing or critter you are messing with right now.  I will use that command when I want to dog to just move on to other things.  My release command is "let's go!".  I'll use that if I know a bird is still around but has moved off from under the point and I want to dog to track it down and point again.  To my frustration, these commands don't always work from a distance when there is an intense point - the Great Montana Porcupine Incident last fall being a perfect example.  They work almost all the time if I am close to the dog.

 

Once a dog knows his/her job and holds a staunch point, I don't think introducing such commands is harmful in any way.

 

I'm no expert, so take my advice with a grain of salt, DDH.

I also use leave it for skunks and porcupines when I am there to go in for the flush. In a hunting situation I have no issues. Barrett ranges out, goes on point, I know where he is, walk in to flush. If the bird is gone he will then relocate, he is trained to hold a point until I get there. At home he has a containment collar that allows him to go a certain distance before a tone is emitted after the tone is a shock. He could be stuck on point somewhere in that area and he will stay there until I find him ignoring me when I call. Today in a snow storm he was stuck on point under cedar trees totally ignoring me. I had to play hide and seek. He never comes back on his own. I like the whistle idea but is Barrett too old at almost 5 to learn new tricks? 

 

I guess I was just really annoyed I had to belly crawl under cedar trees in a snow storm to find my dog. I will definitely think about this when training my next boy.

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Greg Hartman
1 hour ago, DD Huntress said:

I also use leave it for skunks and porcupines when I am there to go in for the flush. In a hunting situation I have no issues. Barrett ranges out, goes on point, I know where he is, walk in to flush. If the bird is gone he will then relocate, he is trained to hold a point until I get there. At home he has a containment collar that allows him to go a certain distance before a tone is emitted after the tone is a shock. He could be stuck on point somewhere in that area and he will stay there until I find him ignoring me when I call. Today in a snow storm he was stuck on point under cedar trees totally ignoring me. I had to play hide and seek. He never comes back on his own. I like the whistle idea but is Barrett too old at almost 5 to learn new tricks? 

 

I guess I was just really annoyed I had to belly crawl under cedar trees in a snow storm to find my dog. I will definitely think about this when training my next boy.

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Oh my!!

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I use a whistle call, tweet-twa-tweet. Means come to me. I use a beeper collar with a bell when hunting but the beeper is for locate only. If the dogs are on birds and I whistle, they will come to me but immediately return to where they were on the bird. If I beep them they will hold point, but if I beep, beep, beep them they come running because they don’t want to get shocked for disobedience. They rarely get shocked. Works for me with my current dogs but may have to try something different with my next one. My dogs have about a 200yard perimeter around the house that they patrol. Sometimes they find birds in that bubble, so when they don’t check in at a normal interval, I whistle them in. If they are “birdy” I put my boots on, follow them back out and flush the bird. Admittedly, it doesn’t always go according to script, but this system works for me here. 

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That is one single minded dog!
Most people strive for that intensity.

Shoot all the birds or cut all the trees! Just kidding.

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