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Question for pointy dog people.


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I have a command - "leave it" - that means get away from whatever thing or critter you are messing with right now.  I will use that command when I want to dog to just move on to other things.  My rele

We have one covert that I despise when Abby finds a bird in it.  Either Floyd or I, depending on whose turn it is from season to season, has to crawl in on hands and knees under the cat briers to flus

Yes it’s a pain in the A** but I look at it this way “ it’s the the dogs job to point and hold and my job to flush”.  These are my rules, if you can call your dog off of point and it does no harm, the

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Jim Vander

My command is "here" its a safety command and is to be unconditionally obeyed. Full disclosure Ive only trained this on  one pointy dog but many labs. When I blow a commanding whistle followed by hear I mean it. Snakes porky, cars it can be a life saver. I train it with pressure and don't use it casually. Im not sure I'd use it in your situation Id be more inclined to get get them. 

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16 hours ago, DD Huntress said:

He never comes back on his own. I like the whistle idea but is Barrett too old at almost 5 to learn new tricks? 

No, Bob West took a 7 yr old dog that had absolutely no prior training in his life and took him all the way to the Invitational and prized him. Old Dogs can lean new tricks. Ask Judy, my wife. It took her awhile but she did get me house broken - eventually.

 

I want to emphasize that I've had 6 Spinoni's and everyone of them was trained to flush on command and it had no detrimental effect on steadiness however as I said before and I want to repeat it, this is something you train Later. You want to be sure you don't have a steadiness issue going in. Calling a dog off point will have far less chance of causing that problem then coming up to the dog and forcing him to break point.  Think about it for awhile. Do you think walking up and hauling a dog away personally is any less an influence? Any less chance of adverse effect?  Not in my opinion or experience. Also remember that if the dog is pointing the vast majority of the time you will approach the dog and hopefully go through the  Flush, steady to Wing,

Shot and Fall and on command retrieve to hand. We all hope!  Anyway "you" make the decision if and when the dog comes under a recall command but when you do the dog should obey if for no other reason then you the Master or Mistress decide to head back, have shot you limit, or you just want to head in a different direction and folks "Leave It" or it's equivalent, is a command you really want your dog to know and obey every time.

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Winnie, always recalls, even on point...except when she doesn't want to....

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SelbyLowndes

I don't much like run-off dogs.  If they don't come back it is just one less rabies shot to pay for next Fall...SelbyLowndes

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When I started running my dog with an Alpha while puttering around at the hunting shack I found that what I had previously thought was my dog running off was him establishing point and refusing to budge.  Prior to the collar I would just worry, scream my brains out and occasionally fire a gun to get him to come in.  My dogs can't be called of what they think is a bird.  Many times I have to physically touch them to release them even when I am 15 feet away (it can be annoying).  I have had to move them physically by picking them up or nudging their butt with my knee on occasion.  I have also spent time trying to release them after an extended flushing attempt only to have a suicidal bird  that is hell bent hiding materialize from no where.  In those cases I tell the dog 'sorry buddy' and try to avoid their reproachful glare.

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We have one covert that I despise when Abby finds a bird in it.  Either Floyd or I, depending on whose turn it is from season to season, has to crawl in on hands and knees under the cat briers to flush the bird for the shooter.  No, Abby stays on point until the bird is flushed.  That's why I pay her and Willa the big bucks.  Willa looks the other way when Abby goes into that brier patch.  Gil

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I would just go find the dog, calling him off or buzzing him off isn’t something I would ever do.  if I thought there was any even remote possibility he was pointing a bird he’s not getting buzzed. I want him rock steady period.

 

I will use juice on one doing something dangerous like porkys, snakes or roads but never on a bird and never if I don’t know what he’s pointing 
 

 

 

 

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On 2/22/2021 at 2:12 AM, OldSarge said:

If the dogs are on birds and I whistle, they will come to me but immediately return to where they were on the bird.

 

If they are “birdy” I put my boots on, follow them back out and flush the bird.

 

That's the way we do it (or at least try to do) in Finland. We call it "tiedotus" which means reporting. You can read more about it here:

 

http://pointingdogblog.blogspot.com/2013/07/versatility-part-1-reporting-from_21.html?m=1

 

The continental breeds can only become FTCH's by proving that they master the reporting.

 

The hunter must learn to read his or her dog. Some dogs are natural reporters, some must be taught. The point is that the dog learns he can only have his reward (retrieving the shot bird) by reporting. This is considered the highest form of collaboration between the dog and the hunter. 

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On 2/22/2021 at 2:12 AM, OldSarge said:

If the dogs are on birds and I whistle, they will come to me but immediately return to where they were on the bird.

 

If they are “birdy” I put my boots on, follow them back out and flush the bird.

 

That's the way we do it (or at least try to do) in Finland. We call it "tiedotus" which means reporting. You can read more about it here:

 

http://pointingdogblog.blogspot.com/2013/07/versatility-part-1-reporting-from_21.html?m=1

 

The continental breeds can only become FTCH's by proving that they master the reporting.

 

The hunter must learn to read his or her dog. Some dogs are natural reporters, some must be taught. The point is that the dog learns he can only have his reward (retrieving the shot bird) by reporting. This is considered the highest form of collaboration between the dog and the hunter. 

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16 hours ago, GLS said:

We have one covert that I despise when Abby finds a bird in it.  Either Floyd or I, depending on whose turn it is from season to season, has to crawl in on hands and knees under the cat briers to flush the bird for the shooter.  No, Abby stays on point until the bird is flushed.  That's why I pay her and Willa the big bucks.  Willa looks the other way when Abby goes into that brier patch.  Gil

I got a place like that to that I actually try to keep the dogs from going into it.  The dogs know though that there are always birds in it.  It's a very big mock orange thicket and the thorns are like hyperdermic needles.  The only way in and out is on all fours.

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Todd, some old time farmers would use mock orange hedges as substitutes for fencing.  Miserable shrub.  Gil

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always flush the bird unless you know he is pointing something he isn't supposed---you don'tk want to correct him for doing the right thing

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3 hours ago, GLS said:

Todd, some old time farmers would use mock orange hedges as substitutes for fencing.  Miserable shrub.  Gil

I have an extremely productive area that usually has tons of WC in it but the Mock orange is so thick I'm almost to a point I'm going to have to stop hunting it.  I cant get to the dogs if they are on point and tend to try and bi pass as much of it as possible.  I could see where they would keep cows fenced in.  

 

This same area 20 years ago was a huge swamp and was extremely great duck hunting.  I went in there one day to see where to hunt the next day.  I flushed a big wad of ducks out of there.  Closer inspection I saw a ton of yellow seeds where they were feeding.  I got out quick and got a GW down there.  He and I went in and I showed him the spot.  He scooped up some of the seeds.  It turned out to be mock orange seeds and the ducks were I guess feeding on them.  I went back the next day and hunted it being it was legal.  That's why I guess there is so much MO all over that area.

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CommandoLando

My pup has to be moved. Hit -15 a little bit ago and I let Hank out to do his business. 20 minutes later he hadn’t come scratching so I got concerned. Opened the door and he was out there locked up on a bird on the fence. Lifting one paw at a time off the snow. Hes a warm weather dog for sure but I’m really falling in love with his grit.

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