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The toad and the snake


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KCrowley

We have toads. We also have Eastern hognose snakes, which love to hunt toads. But this is first time I've seen a snake eat a toad. It was a big toad, too! And kudos to Ruby the Setter for spotting them!

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WPG Gizmo

Well it's full now that snake wont eat for awhile

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Korthaar

My daughter would be devastated. She has had 2 in a terrarium for about 3-4 years.  Todd and Bob. Todd is actually a girl.

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grouse28

I’ve seen that in the wild and with captive snakes. It is frustrating, I want to yell out, “use your hands!”. Wait, no they don’t have hands. Amazing that they can get a toad or a rat down their throat.

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2 hours ago, Korthaar said:

My daughter would be devastated. She has had 2 in a terrarium for about 3-4 years.  Todd and Bob. Todd is actually a girl.

I keep several toads and a number of native species of frogs and the odd blue spotted salamander. The Eastern American toad (Bufo americanus) make very nice

Terrarium or vivarium pets. Your daughter might be happy to know that in captivity (and get this) they can live decades. The oldest that I know of Lived for 37 years

and died accidentally during an exhibit renovation was going on at the zoo where he was kept. Over feeding and ingestion of debris along with it's food (dirt, sand, plant matter) which impacts their digestive systems is often the cause of death. They do not like or need deep water features in their habitats and are a poor choice for carefully tended and groomed show piece enclosures. They Love to burrow and don't give 2 dead flies about your carefully planted and tended live plants and landscaped tank.

They will rip it up, crush, and up end such show pieces like wild hogs in a planted 40. You need to bear that in mind. Think heavy duty!

Drift wood, Rock formations, larger well rooted live plants and or artificial plants well anchored. They love little tunnels and cave like pockets. Do not try to keep much smaller toads or frogs in with them. They will eat them. 

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3 minutes ago, grouse28 said:

I’ve seen that in the wild and with captive snakes. It is frustrating, I want to yell out, “use your hands!”. Wait, no they don’t have hands. Amazing that they can get a toad or a rat down their throat.

The hog nose snakes are rear fanged and equipped to puncture the toad's lungs which it inflates to prevent smaller predators from swallowing them and allowing the predator to get a good taste of the toxic substance the toad execrates from it's upper back.

The hog nosed snake gets around these defenses.

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Greg Hartman

Great pics, Keith!

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Korthaar
22 hours ago, Spin said:

I keep several toads and a number of native species of frogs and the odd blue spotted salamander. The Eastern American toad (Bufo americanus) make very nice

Terrarium or vivarium pets. Your daughter might be happy to know that in captivity (and get this) they can live decades. The oldest that I know of Lived for 37 years

and died accidentally during an exhibit renovation was going on at the zoo where he was kept. Over feeding and ingestion of debris along with it's food (dirt, sand, plant matter) which impacts their digestive systems is often the cause of death. They do not like or need deep water features in their habitats and are a poor choice for carefully tended and groomed show piece enclosures. They Love to burrow and don't give 2 dead flies about your carefully planted and tended live plants and landscaped tank.

They will rip it up, crush, and up end such show pieces like wild hogs in a planted 40. You need to bear that in mind. Think heavy duty!

Drift wood, Rock formations, larger well rooted live plants and or artificial plants well anchored. They love little tunnels and cave like pockets. Do not try to keep much smaller toads or frogs in with them. They will eat them. 

Thanks for the information. We are mindful of the debris ingestion. Her toads will eat from her hand or tweezers. As a side note. I have an aquarium porthole catfish that's over 20 years old now. I've wanted to shut my tank down years ago, but don't have the heart to rehome him.

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3 hours ago, Korthaar said:

Thanks for the information. We are mindful of the debris ingestion. Her toads will eat from her hand or tweezers. As a side note. I have an aquarium porthole catfish that's over 20 years old now. I've wanted to shut my tank down years ago, but don't have the heart to rehome him.

I had an Oscar like that. The fish had personality. It would get excited when you walked into the room and eat from your hands, even jump to take food out of your fingers.

Take a look at some of the real showpiece vivarium's on YouTube. One of the neuro surgeons I've seen had some incredibly beautiful vivarium's. Hid pride and joy was

all natural and bio sustaining with a population of breeding brilliant metallic blue cichlids in the waterfall fed water feature. Poison Dart frogs shared the enclosure.

Lighting was perfect, fogger. You could look at that 3D wonder for hours.

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KCrowley

Some people call hognose snakes the "American cobra." This is why: they can flatten and flare their necks just like cobras. Damn cool adaptation if you ask me.

 

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D. Case

Hognose snakes will also shake their tails like a rattler, then stand up like a cobra before trying to run and hide.   Cool snakes,  We had a few on the sand hill where I grew up which also had a colony of 13 lined ground squirrels. When the ground squirrels  disappeared so did the snakes. My mother had a degree in Herpetology and was always looking for snakes, salamanders and lizards. The Hognose were her favorites. If you pick up a Hognose it will expel the foulest smelling crap to get you to drop it.   My daughters photo of "her" Garter Snake with a baby bird in her garden. 

Snake with baby bird.jpeg

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Hadn't seen your "it's famous now" post, but just got the OL email update and saw "snake & toad" and immediately thought of you!

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quailguy
On 6/5/2021 at 12:23 PM, KCrowley said:

Some people call hognose snakes the "American cobra." This is why: they can flatten and flare their necks just like cobras. Damn cool adaptation if you ask me.

 

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One of the peculiarities about hog nosed snakes is they will usually refuse to bite a human. I have caught dozens of the back in east Texas and not one would bite me. Toads they bite.  

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