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quailguy

Wow, this is really terrific news! Hope it holds up. The guy next to me has 3 chestnut trees that show no blight. Now they may be Chinese chestnuts; I cannot tell them apart. But these have real chestnuts on them. I have for years wanted to live long enough to see the American Chestnut restored. Maybe I will.

 

"This is a wild chestnut tree with 35,000 American chestnut genes — and one extra gene," Klak told his crew of volunteers last week as he held a sapling.

That extra gene is a simple wheat gene also found in strawberries and barley, and which contains blight. Klak, who teaches environmental studies at the University of New England, hopes the gene will inoculate the young chestnut to help it withstand blight's effects in the wild."

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Dave in Maine

A friend had a couple American chestnuts on their former property in central Connecticut.  The trees were not as large as chestnuts get - still growing - but they bore lots of nuts.  It was kinda funny, though, because the local squirrels didn't eat them.  Probably forgot they were good to eat.  The darn burrs were a hazard - kept one wearing shoes.

 

Another friend here in Portland has a couple in his yard.  I've joked with him about sending a twig (with the very distinctive leaves), some burrs and nuts to the city arborist in an unmarked envelope, just to break chops.

 

There are also some chestnuts on some public land outside Brunswick. 

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I'd like to see success in restoring American Chestnuts to it's native habitat, that would be an awesome success story!

 

I have 9 living American chestnut I planted on our property here in Idaho. Originally planted 25 but the darn pocket gophers killed most of them. Supposedly the blight doesn't exist here in the west and so far no signs of it on the trees I have planted. There are 4-5 American chestnuts planted in the city park in Coeur d'Alene that are huge. I've gone over to the park and collected some of the nuts, brought them home and roasted them. I liked them although not much flavor!

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Sheldrake
13 hours ago, quailguy said:

Wow, this is really terrific news! Hope it holds up. The guy next to me has 3 chestnut trees that show no blight. Now they may be Chinese chestnuts; I cannot tell them apart. But these have real chestnuts on them. I have for years wanted to live long enough to see the American Chestnut restored. Maybe I will.

 

"This is a wild chestnut tree with 35,000 American chestnut genes — and one extra gene," Klak told his crew of volunteers last week as he held a sapling.

That extra gene is a simple wheat gene also found in strawberries and barley, and which contains blight. Klak, who teaches environmental studies at the University of New England, hopes the gene will inoculate the young chestnut to help it withstand blight's effects in the wild."

Uh Oh..........GMO chestnuts!

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One of Penn State’s bigger research plots for the cross breeds is just around the corner from me. It’s about 6 or 8 acres. It’s been interesting to watch over the 10 years or so it’s been there. They have it fenced so the deer can’t get to it.

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gunsrus

Walking to school as a kid , chestnuts were the favorite thing to throw . They were everywhere . Never roasted them but when I got married my mother in law roasted some and I learned how good they taste . 

Haven't seen one in years . I buy them in the grocery store .

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quailguy
38 minutes ago, gunsrus said:

Walking to school as a kid , chestnuts were the favorite thing to throw . They were everywhere . Never roasted them but when I got married my mother in law roasted some and I learned how good they taste . 

Haven't seen one in years . I buy them in the grocery store .

Back in the Stone Age, during the winter, especially around Christmas, I used to buy hot roasted chestnuts from vendors in Vienna.

Brings back some memories!

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Sheldrake

A story related to grouse hunting.....Many moons ago, I was a grad student at VA Tech. One of the profs in our department was an ardent grouse and duck hunter. We hit it off due to shared interest outside of work and spent a lot of time in the mountains after grouse. Grouse populations were decent then. Remnant populations of American chestnut were everywhere and evident as sprouts from blighted stumps. The sprouts seldom survived to reach four or five feet before the fungus took them. Every once in a while, my prof friend would find a surviving tree that although badly cankered, would be years old and still alive. Seeds from these trees were the origination of the American Chestnut breeding-for-resistance program that was in its infancy then. This program was/is a traditional breeding hybridization program. Quite different from the gene-splicing program that Remo references. 

 

Wish I could go back to those times. As I recall, our typical flush rate was about 1/hr. We hunted old abandoned mountain farms and my friend's grouse dog was a Visela named Gypsy. Hiking up and down those mountain sides was not for the physically unfit!

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MAArcher

I'm pretty sure there's all kinds of GMO stuff out there in the wild we don't even know about.  There where a couple geese and a couple grouse past season that I'm pretty sure were GMO'd to resist lead poisoning.   

 

A few years back I found a tree I couldn't identify.  Down in New Bedford, MA.  Not big deal because I don't know my trees very well at all.  But I snapped a pic and sent it to my friend who does tree work.  He wrote back "Wow, where's that?  I think its a chestnut!" and after a little research confirmed it.  Not sure if it's GMO'd, but it was a chestnut, a stand of a dozen of them.  Only about 15 feet tall so young still.

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I know of a few trees on one of our Pa State gamelands that normally produce a pretty good crop of nuts most years.  These are fairly large trees but I have no idea which variety they are.

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Spiller

Cape Elizabeth, a remote town?   hahahahahahahaha  That is like calling Wellesley remote to Boston!

 

I live just outside of Bangor and there are 100's of experimental chestnuts that are planted in the local Land Trust.

 

When I was kid, my father talked about "chestnuts roasting on an open fire" just like in the song, when he was a kid, but the only kind of chestnuts that I saw growing up were horse chestnuts. 

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Sheldrake

Yeah, lots of confusion about "Chestnut" I.D. Horse chestnuts are not really chestnuts. Totally different genus. And then there are the Chinese chestnuts. Same genus as American chestnuts, but different species. The Chinese species is resistant to the blight.

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