Jump to content

Picking up a setter pup this weekend


Recommended Posts

sidelock

The Merritt line of dogs are the real deal. I have a paternal grandson of Blaze x Pearl and he's got everything I look for in a bird dog. Extremely intelligent, long nosed, endless bottom and stands high on his toes on point. I must admit he wasn't the type of pupil for the faint hearted to develop but the very god ones that stand above the rest very seldom are. Wish I had access to  post a picture of him. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 66
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • chilly460

    25

  • Mike Connally

    4

  • Chukarman

    3

  • kgb

    3

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

The selections have been sorted out and I'll be picking up a female setter pup this weekend.  Flying into Dallas, picking her up Saturday, and ripping back to Richmond with some BBQ stops along the wa

Well I found a coupon so figured I’d pick up another one…

Pups continue to grow and learn, they’ve become a bit more sturdy and have no problem going on nature walks, just hit three months old. It’s been interesting observing their differences in personality

Posted Images

chilly460
1 hour ago, sidelock said:

The Merritt line of dogs are the real deal. I have a paternal grandson of Blaze x Pearl and he's got everything I look for in a bird dog. Extremely intelligent, long nosed, endless bottom and stands high on his toes on point. I must admit he wasn't the type of pupil for the faint hearted to develop but the very god ones that stand above the rest very seldom are. Wish I had access to  post a picture of him. 

Thanks for the info, that’s the feedback I’ve received from several folks, hopefully they follow suit. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
BoilerMan1812
17 hours ago, sidelock said:

The Merritt line of dogs are the real deal. I have a paternal grandson of Blaze x Pearl and he's got everything I look for in a bird dog. Extremely intelligent, long nosed, endless bottom and stands high on his toes on point. I must admit he wasn't the type of pupil for the faint hearted to develop but the very god ones that stand above the rest very seldom are. Wish I had access to  post a picture of him. 
 

What specifically makes the Merritt line difficult to develop? Could you explain further? 
 

Thanks!

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
sidelock
On 7/26/2021 at 12:54 PM, BoilerMan1812 said:

 

I did not say the Merritt line is "difficult to develop". My dog in particular is  extremely intelligent, has tremendous prey drive and is very bold and independent. That combination can be testing for the unexperienced or the faint of heart but for someone who wants an exceptional performer, those are desirable traits providing you have the knowledge and experience to harness that energy.    

Link to post
Share on other sites
Scott Berg
On 7/25/2021 at 6:28 PM, sidelock said:

The Merritt line of dogs are the real deal. I have a paternal grandson of Blaze x Pearl and he's got everything I look for in a bird dog. Extremely intelligent, long nosed, endless bottom and stands high on his toes on point. I must admit he wasn't the type of pupil for the faint hearted to develop but the very god ones that stand above the rest very seldom are. Wish I had access to  post a picture of him. 

 

This is Merritt's Blaze.  I attempted to breed a female to him last year via frozen semen.  Unfortunately, It did not take.  When selecting the female I carefully considered the traits you mentioned.  The female I attempted to breed is extremely biddable.  She literally required no training and I rarely say anything to her while hunting open country and it does not take much in the woods either.  

 

1874776833_MerrittsBlaze-1B.thumb.jpg.811f9651b6aea784722a39211613cb89.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites
Chukarman

Nice looking setter, Scott!

Link to post
Share on other sites
chilly460

Well, both pups are pretty bold, but the black masked one in particular.  Both run the yard and are already mixing it up with my female setter, the black masked pup already climbed out of our wire enclosure in the house.  Both took on the stairs from the deck without coaxing, I carry them down for now but they did it on their own surprisingly.  This is what I wanted, just takes some care and training to make sure it can be harnessed.  Blaze is a great looking dog for sure, and I can see where Davinci got his head shape.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
Ray Gubernat
11 hours ago, sidelock said:

I did not say the Merritt line is "difficult to develop". My dog in particular is  extremely intelligent, has tremendous prey drive and is very bold and independent. That combination can be testing for the unexperienced or the faint of heart but for someone who wants an exceptional performer, those are desirable traits providing you have the knowledge and experience to harness that energy.    

Very well said. 

 

The best of the best in bird dogs have ALL of the tools and BOATLOADS of drive, independence and desire.  They live and breathe to find birds. They are also usually fairly quick on the uptake, because developing field trial competitors is an expensive deal and a dog that comes along sooner is a plus.  

 

If their owner is not ready for that level of raw talent, things can go sideways pretty quickly in training, especially if the dog is smart, because they will start to figure out alternative solutions to the training.   Often the raw enthusiasm and independence can be mistaken for lack of control or failure to comply and cause the  trainer to apply unnecessary pressure.  

  

Also, if the owner has not had dogs that can run a lick, it can be  scary to cut such a puppy loose and watch it run out of sight. To be honest...I still have a it of a problem with that, so I do understand. 

 

I'm not saying it can't be done by a first time bird dog owner, because it absolutely CAN.  I am saying that the first time owner or the inexperienced owner needs to understand the process and do things in an organized, thorough and thoughtful way(plan your work and then go out and work your plan) with a fair measure of willingness to put the time in to the training, on a daily basis.     

 

RayG

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
chilly460

Interesting points.  

 

My llewellin, Mae Mae, is not at all a AA dog, but she's what most folks would call "high strung" and can be pretty stubborn....but she's smart.  Recently we got her fully broke, had about four sessions where she handled birds perfectly, I was ready to call her "done".  Then all of a sudden, she not only broke on birds, she was roading in and trying to flush them up.   She'd been steady to flush since she was five months old, and now regressed to busting birds.  But thinking on it, I'd been training her 2x/week on Coturnix (only thing available) which don't fly well and she KNEW that no matter what, those birds were going to fly but come down somewhere close.  She figured this out and wanted to flush them herself, thinking she didn't need us to help catch the birds.  

 

We switched back to pigeons in launchers and ran her again, she roaded the first one and we popped the launcher as she ran in.  The next 3 birds, she was back to steady to flush, and to wing and shot.   Just takes a little experience to stay one step ahead of these smart dogs.  She'll get a dose of pigeons while training on Thursday and Sunday this week, then I'll test her on some Coturnix again to see if she gets it straight. 

 

She's a nice little dog and hunts fine, but I'd never consider breeding her because I don't want the headache of what is likely to be a lifelong battle with her stubborn streak.   I have to imagine top end breeders would make the same call, no question, and over time this would ensure their dogs perform well but are easy to train.   Wehle said as much in his book, saying that his first priority was intelligence but also that biddability and handle was high as he needed the dog to be easy to assess at a young age, and easy to keep on course at trials.  

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
BoilerMan1812

Thanks all for the the clarification and discussion. In re-reading the question I posted, maybe “difficult” wasn’t the best choice of words. Regardless, thanks for sharing your experiences. Sounds like Merritt blood is the real deal! 

Link to post
Share on other sites
chilly460

Took the pups out for a little puppy walk and decided to see what they’d do with birds.  McKenna chased hers and then point kicked in as she was stalking.  Willett followed scent to the bird and chased hers down.  No expectations at 8wks and certainly no pressure but happy to see they’re birdy little pups

25334C2F-C2BC-42C6-AE05-607B97ACD8F6.png

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/19/2021 at 8:47 AM, chilly460 said:

It'll be interesting to see if three dogs gets us to a point where we say "that's enough!".  I've found the more dog power, the better, so I'm not the proper voice of reason to stop growing the pack :)

I know how you feel. Judy and I had 6 dogs for quite a few years but having done that I, speaking for myself, would have to say that there is limits to personal time and resources. You can have 4,5 or 6 and care greatly for each and every one of them but there are only so many hours in a day and only so many years allotted to a dogs short stay with each of us. I came to feel that at times some of the "gang" didn't fully get the time in the Field they should of or I, managed to give them. 

      It can be all to easy, like eating an incredibly delicious taste treat, to let yourself over do it. You love it, it feels incredibly satisfying, and desire overrules temperance and reason. Oh it can happen. On the other hand losing your dog or even worse 2 in quick succession can leave a large and very painful void in a person's life.  Having another younger furry beast

there can soften that blow very much.

Link to post
Share on other sites
john mcg

We have had three at a time, but most of the years its been two dogs and we find that easier in some ways than one.

Since last year, we are loving one. Its near time (due to age spread) for another pup.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Rthawker

Pups look great! Cant wait to see them in person. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now



×
×
  • Create New...