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Annual Dove Hunters Sound Off


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5 minutes ago, gunut said:

I try everything I shoot with salt and pepper..doves dont pass that test...with all the stuff you have to do to make doves palatable ...I say you could do the same with a dog turd.....

If you call salt and pepper alone a reasonable test of culinary worthiness perhaps you'd be better off sticking to Hot Pockets and canned goods. And clean up your language son.

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I moved to Missouri in 2003 not knowing anybody.  Met a contractor we use at work that loves to bird hunt and happens to have a few farms of his own plus knows everybody within 100 mile radius.  He ha

I like to dove hunt, it kicks my season off on Sept 1st. I don't do the social thing tho, just hunt by myself or with one other person. Mostly hunt public land. Most guys give up after the first week,

What is a dove season without some dove poppers to eat.   These I peeled the breast filet off with my thumb (used to filet with a knife, but found all you gotta do is apply some pressure wit

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molliesmaster

Opening day meals. 

1A60CDAA-63CD-4EDF-9EE5-A7DB341A6E8E.jpeg

B8815BB1-E4BD-4F9D-AE12-1D4990939492.jpeg

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Dogwood

No legal dove hunting in Michigan.   Hunted them for the first time last year in Indiana.  Great fun and challenging shooting.

 

Fabulous eating.  Must be flash cooked rare.

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Cooter Brown
4 hours ago, Brad Eden said:

No dove hunting in Maine. Do they taste as good as I keep hearing about?

 

3 hours ago, GLS said:

Beg to differ about dove tasting like liver.  If it did, it was overcooked.  

As for gamebirds tasting like liver, author Stephen Bodio has this to say:
“Also notice the color of the cut flesh. Like all good Woodcock (and snipe) cooks, he sort of passes them through a very hot oven. I get tired of hearing how dark- fleshed birds “taste like liver”- good LIVER doesn’t taste like liver when it is cooked rare, turned over quickly in hot bacon fat and butter. My disgusted French- born gourmand friend Guy de la Valdene, after he read an American recipe for woodcock that involved two cans of cream of mushroom soup and an hour and a half in the oven, wrote (in Making Game in 1990): “As this recipe negates the whole reason for killing the birds in the first place, why not take it a step further and poach the Woodcock overnight in equal parts of catsup, pabulum, and Pepto- Bismol.” Gil

As indicated by Gil and Mr. Bodio here, I find dove breasts to be extremely close to woodcock breasts.  They're even very similar in shape and appearance.  Frankly if cooked the same way and eaten side by side I suspect they'd be near indistinguishable to just about anyone.  I've never understood people who say they like to eat dove but not woodcock.  Both are the same dark purple color; duck breasts are too. Note that the legs of the woodcock are lighter in color than the breast.  There's a difference in flight muscles between migratory birds (woodcock, dove) that fly more than they walk and ground birds that walk more than they fly; birds like grouse, quail, turkeys have lighter breasts and darker legs.

 

 

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Brad Eden
4 hours ago, Brad Eden said:

Interesting. I like ruffed grouse but I also like Woodcock. It’s interesting, and makes perfect sense how ground birds like grouse and quail and wild turkey (don’t particularly fly much) have the delicate white breast meat and tough red meat legs and thighs, while the flying/migrating birds like dove and woodcock and waterfowl have the rich dark breasts and more tender white legs and thighs. I’m guessing I’d like dove. Now all the mourning doves we have here are gonna make my mouth water. 

 

5 minutes ago, Cooter Brown said:

Note that the legs of the woodcock are lighter in color than the breast.  There's a difference in flight muscles between migratory birds (woodcock, dove) that fly more than they walk and ground birds that walk more than they fly; birds like grouse, quail, turkeys have lighter breasts and darker legs.

 

 

 You probably said it better than me…

 

Ill add that many people who do like to eat Woodcock still discard the legs and thighs. Probably considering them too small. An egregious faux pas. They are white meat, tender and a delicious little appetizer treats. 

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9 minutes ago, Cooter Brown said:

 

As indicated by Gil and Mr. Bodio here, I find dove breasts to be extremely close to woodcock breasts.  They're even very similar in shape and appearance.  Frankly if cooked the same way and eaten side by side I suspect they'd be near indistinguishable to just about anyone.  I've never understood people who say they like to eat dove but not woodcock.  Both are the same dark purple color; duck breasts are too. 

In TX we have a late season for dove that overlaps with WC.  This gives me an idea - next January I'm going to do my best to have a mixed bird hunt.  There are doves in the field areas that abut some of the WC covers.  The upside is that there may be more shots at birds that I can miss.

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Cooter Brown
23 minutes ago, Brad Eden said:

 

 You probably said it better than me…

 

Ill add that many people who do like to eat Woodcock still discard the legs and thighs. Probably considering them too small. An egregious faux pas. They are white meat, tender and a delicious little appetizer treats. 

Einstein said that the definition of insanity is throwing away woodcock legs and thighs.

 

My usual recipe separates the legs/thighs from the breast, and I cook them a little longer than I do the breasts, which get hardly any cooking at all...

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SelbyLowndes

The September dove season opener in GA is the release from the misery months which began May 15th when the turkey season closed.  Usually too hot and the local birds are too immature, but hunting season nevertheless.

 

I enjoy the social aspect and a good barbeque lunch before the afternoon opening day shoot.  As for the food aspect, I like to eat doves just fine. 

 

Preparation is just to breast and soak a while in Italian dressing. I usually start the bacon before the birds on the grill and wrap the nearly cooked but still pliable bacon around the dove breasts for a fast hot scorch to finish the bacon off and leave the dove rare.  Don't like peppers much.

 

I'm planning to shoot an old  Prussian Daly (Lindner) featherweight 12ga this year.  It's not one of the fancy Diamond Grades, but a modest Model 135, I think?...SelbyLowndes 

 

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john mcg

Lots of dove fields (as they call them) around here. I have never tried it, but have thought about it.

I reckon, without the dog work, I'm not real motivated.

Its a big thing around here and I've been invited---folks said the same---its a big social thing.

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12 minutes ago, john mcg said:

Lots of dove fields (as they call them) around here. I have never tried it, but have thought about it.

I reckon, without the dog work, I'm not real motivated.

Its a big thing around here and I've been invited---folks said the same---its a big social thing.


 

Can be plenty of good dog work on a dove shoot. Of course if you’ve hunted them much, you’ve probably seen as much, if not more, lousy dog work. At least with the latter, you can accumulate some extra birds…..  😉

 

 

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Chukarman

I love early season dove shooting. My duck club used to host a members only dove shoot every year and many members gave me their doves. So I would do a dove dinner opening day of duck season every year.

 

Pluck the birds. Marinade the whole birds in dry Madiera with a little garlic and white pepper. Them dry the birds and rub with olive oil. Flash cook them by rolling them around on a grill over mesquite charcoal. Serve over braised spinach with a good red - I like Malbec or Pinot Noir.

 

When scouting I look for safflower, melons, or sunflower fields, though I have often done well shooting a pass from an almond orchard.

 

I usually shoot my 20 Gauge Lindner Daly, but may shoot my MX-20 this year. Photo below of the Dove Trifecta - whitewing, collared dove, and mourning dove.

 

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Greg Hartman

I hunted them as a kid.  Prior to becoming a caregiver for my wife and, now, in recent times, the dogs and I would be west for the sharptail opener on September 1, which I MUCH prefer because it is real upland hunting for pointy dogs, not just shooting.  But, during the years I was providing care for my wife, I would desperately look forward to September 1 because that is the opening of dove season here.    Doves were what we had to hunt in the early season and I couldn't go anywhere, so hunt them we did.  Helped me survive those awful years.

 

We hunted the several family farms in the area, so no social "shoot" type atmosphere, just me and the dogs jump shooting and pass shooting.  We'd cover a lot of miles in a day.  Joy on a hill by some flowers watching incomers:

 

9-8-17 - Joy afield in flowers - 3

 

When young, I hunted them with a .410.  They were very plentiful and you could pick your shots - doing so made the day last longer before you limited out.  But in later years, they became more scarce and definitely flew much higher - you needed to be able to kill out to a full 50 yards if you wanted to bring home a nice bag.   A 20 gauge with a good bit of choke and 7/8 oz. of #7.5 at 1,200 fps is all that is needed - no big, heavy 12 gauge cannon loads.  If you can put the pattern on the bird at 50 yards or a bit more, it will fall. 

 

This was the very first bird of the last season I hunted doves here - 2017 - with the trusty 20 gauge.

 

9-2-16 - Very first bird of the 2016-17 season

 

The late, great Chaser retrieving:

 

9-28-16 - Chase retrieve

 

It is my least favorite of the game bird meat I eat (I won't touch woodcock), but I can and do eat dove.  Done rare in a hot iron pan with a little oil, it is tolerable.

 

We see countless doves where we hunt out west and could shoot piles of them, but I don't shoot at them at all - I keep the ammo and dog effort for bigger game, like sharptails, Huns, etc.

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tomturkey2x2

I realized several years ago how much I love doves, shooting, eating ,and admiring them. Beautiful birds! I started going dove hunting  at 6  with my daisy, 66 years ago. Still love it, hope to kill enough to eat several times this year!

Like them cooked several different ways, all very good!

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