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Maine has eliminated the tagging of Wild Turkey during the Fall hunt.


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Brad Eden

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Maine (wildlife biologists) have eliminated the tagging of Wild Turkey during the Fall hunt.

 

Maines Fall turkey hunt commences on September 20 and ends on November 6. The total bag limit is 5 birds of either sex. The bag limits vary in different zones but the total is 5. Most Fall turkey are taken by roadside opportunity since the fall hunt hasn’t really taken hold…given hunters in Maine are busy bird and bear and deer and moose hunting from early September through end of December. I do fall turkey hunt but without a lot of enthusiasm.

 

I’m sure this lack of tagging and high bag limit will be met with a certain amount of skepticism from turkey hunters experiencing low numbers in their state. I even think the 5 limit is a bit of overkill even if a load of turkeys aren’t killed, and that many hunters don’t pursue fall turkeys. I’m not convinced this law change will result in a lot of poaching or killing more than the limit. Although some scofflaws will not buy the required turkey license and drive by blast. Here is an article about this game law change.

 

BDN/No Tagging required for fall turkeys.

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mister grouse

Maine apparently has a growing turkey population and can stand the fall harvest without affecting the overall flock in the state.  Not so in some states these days. The issue of hen hunting in the fall has been a hot button in many states.  The current in vogue biologist theories (Dr Chambein et al ) say in states where turkey population may be in decline there should be no hen hunting, as a  flock protective management safeguard..  

 

Tennessee for some years tried liberal fall turkey seasons and offered many additional cheap tags in some counties. A LOT of hens were "legally" killed in some counties; way way more than made any flock management sense.  Some people  would post pictures and brag about killing 8-10 hens a day--legally.  It was insane and ridiculous poor turkey management IMO . Most fall turkeys were being killed by deer gun and bow hunting as a "additional" opportunity target.  Few spring turkey hunters apparently even participated. 

 

 It is no surprise that Some of the principal counties where this kind of wholesale hen hunting /klling slaughter occurred now have special regulations in place to try to replenish a devastated population base.  

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Brad Eden

The one issue I do see now that I’ve had a chance to digest this new law of no tagging fall turkeys is…a fair share will be blasted by people who haven’t paid up for their wild turkey hunting license. These people aren’t turkey hunters per say and won’t go to the trouble of actually hunting them in any way shape or form, but if the opportunity presents itself while cruising backroads, and no one the wiser. I am a real proponent of rural living, but that’s gonna happen. The MEIF&W does know that and they adjust management planning to absorb a certain amount of poaching be it deer or turkey. 

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grouse28

That’s interesting. Just came home from 10 days in the northern portion of the “County”.

Saw probably 70 or more turkeys. Fall turkey hunting is not permitted in that area.

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Brad Eden

I’m seeing a fair share of wild turkeys during my usual running around close to home. Multiple hens grouped up with their almost full grown polts. As many as 20-30 in a flock. I may try and make it more of a challenge and save some shells and try to shoot some with my XBow. (I’ve shot fall and spring wild turkeys with my compound bow)

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Treerooster
On 8/17/2021 at 2:24 PM, Brad Eden said:

The one issue I do see now that I’ve had a chance to digest this new law of no tagging fall turkeys is…a fair share will be blasted by people who haven’t paid up for their wild turkey hunting license. These people aren’t turkey hunters per say and won’t go to the trouble of actually hunting them in any way shape or form, but if the opportunity presents itself while cruising backroads, and no one the wiser. I am a real proponent of rural living, but that’s gonna happen. The MEIF&W does know that and they adjust management planning to absorb a certain amount of poaching be it deer or turkey. 

 

If a person is going to shoot a turkey without buying a license why does not having to tag the turkey have any influence on it. Not trying to argue, but I just don't see the logic. If a guy is going to poach a turkey, he is not going to buy a license either way it would seem.

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Brad Eden
4 hours ago, Treerooster said:

 

If a person is going to shoot a turkey without buying a license why does not having to tag the turkey have any influence on it. Not trying to argue, but I just don't see the logic. If a guy is going to poach a turkey, he is not going to buy a license either way it would seem.

Hmm, I’ll give it a shot. I’m talking rural Maine where dudes still drive around with shotguns in a rack over the back cab window of their trucks all year long. Joe Chevy doesn’t hunt wild turkeys. He’s a deya huntah. Can’t stand them really, thinks they are a pest, the cause of deer decline, increase in ticks, pimples, climate change et al. But he does like to shoot stuff. Generally he didn’t bother to try and kill wild turkeys. And he certainly wouldn’t pay money for a license. Wild turkeys were required to be tagged like a big game animal, like deer and moose and bear! That lent them street or field or woods cred, and a degree of watchfulness by state game wardens. Now that you can go kill 5 turkeys in fall, even hens, even poults, and on top of that they don’t even deserve to be officially tagged then they ARE overpopulated and they are pests! …so why not try and shoot some while cruising around… 

 

Best I got.

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Treerooster
10 hours ago, Brad Eden said:

Hmm, I’ll give it a shot. I’m talking rural Maine where dudes still drive around with shotguns in a rack over the back cab window of their trucks all year long. Joe Chevy doesn’t hunt wild turkeys. He’s a deya huntah. Can’t stand them really, thinks they are a pest, the cause of deer decline, increase in ticks, pimples, climate change et al. But he does like to shoot stuff. Generally he didn’t bother to try and kill wild turkeys. And he certainly wouldn’t pay money for a license. Wild turkeys were required to be tagged like a big game animal, like deer and moose and bear! That lent them street or field or woods cred, and a degree of watchfulness by state game wardens. Now that you can go kill 5 turkeys in fall, even hens, even poults, and on top of that they don’t even deserve to be officially tagged then they ARE overpopulated and they are pests! …so why not try and shoot some while cruising around… 

 

Best I got.

 Good explanation. Thanks.

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