Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Ridge Runner

Anybody have any feelings or factuals as to how the RGS is making out with their new business plan replacing biologists with forestry salespeople?

 

Just curious.  

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Rockford Setters

We had our annual banquet Wednesday evening, Glen Blackwood, our regional director gave an update for Michigan and the cutting is on course to more than triple for grouse focused habitat.  Our new guy is making a difference according to the report.  There is a lot of cutting going on across the state and a plan for more woodcock habitat in central lower Michigan is also on the horizon.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Pleasant Ridge

Stewardship agreements have been signed with 3 National Forests in the Southern Appalachians. Large project being completed on the North Cumberland WMA, which was initiated by RGS chapter dollars..

Link to post
Share on other sites
Brad Eden

The name Glen Blackwood is familiar, he may be or had been a UJ Member.

 

Moved to Conservation Forum.

 

And this will likely be a testy subject, by design, please discuss without it getting nasty or I will remove it. Thank you. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Jim Vander

Interesting approach and one that makes sense to me,  a lot more likely to create population by creating habitat than studying it to death.  Which is to not to say they dont need biologists.   Maybe my state could learn something from them. We have biologists setting policy in a bubble drives me crazy. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

My 2 cents is that it is a great strategy for getting young successional growth.  I believe that this will be a successful venture for the future, however the way they broomed their biologists was an unforgivable act for me. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
boon hogganbeck

Side note: former RGS biologist Linda Ordiway was quickly snapped up by the West Virginia DNR, and they're ramping up to do more habitat creation on state-owned forest land.  (Getting anything happening on the Monongahela NF is another matter...)

Link to post
Share on other sites
Cooter Brown
1 hour ago, boon hogganbeck said:

Side note: former RGS biologist Linda Ordiway was quickly snapped up by the West Virginia DNR, and they're ramping up to do more habitat creation on state-owned forest land.  (Getting anything happening on the Monongahela NF is another matter...)

I think this is a win for all concerned.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey folks - 

 

This is a great question and an opportunity to give a bit of an update on where we're at with progress on our impact from the new model. 

 

First and foremost, I see a lot of great comments specifically about Linda and her work. It's been a privilege to stay connected with her and to support some of her efforts with WV DNR. As Cooter notes, her role with WV DNR is a win for all parties. 

 

As for a general update, our 2020 impact report is a part of the Fall issue of Covers which should be hitting mailboxes soon. That gives a run down of what was worked on by region through 2020. 

 

Overall, a few highlights (this list is certainly not exhaustive):

 

  • 2021 will see a 10x in grant funding for projects, almost entirely of which is dedicated to impacting habitat.
  • Multiple stewardship agreements signed (such as the Chippewa in MN and the Daniel Boone in KY). 
    • Multiple more in the works, including some of the following:
      • Huron-Manistee
      • GW/Jeff
      • Monongahela
      • Green Mountain
  • As @Pleasant Ridge noted, work on the North Cumberland WMA in TN leveraging chapter funds and PR money
  • Following a similar approach leveraging NC chapter and PR funds on NC gamelands in WNC
  • Multiple collaboration projects with the American Bird Conservancy on early successional habitat in various states including PA, and WI.
  • Multiple NFWF grants aimed at young forest habitat.

 

Hope this gives a decent overview for folks. As I mentioned, full 2020 highlights hitting mailboxes in the next issue. Additionally, we're working with all Forest Conservation Directors to host more regular webinar style events giving updates on their work and to solicit ideas and feedback from members.

 

Feel free to ping me with questions. 

 

Best,
Mike 

 

Director of Regional Development - Southeast 

Link to post
Share on other sites
boon hogganbeck
1 hour ago, Deuce said:

Hey folks - 

 

This is a great question and an opportunity to give a bit of an update on where we're at with progress on our impact from the new model. 

 

First and foremost, I see a lot of great comments specifically about Linda and her work. It's been a privilege to stay connected with her and to support some of her efforts with WV DNR. As Cooter notes, her role with WV DNR is a win for all parties. 

 

As for a general update, our 2020 impact report is a part of the Fall issue of Covers which should be hitting mailboxes soon. That gives a run down of what was worked on by region through 2020. 

 

Overall, a few highlights (this list is certainly not exhaustive):

 

  • 2021 will see a 10x in grant funding for projects, almost entirely of which is dedicated to impacting habitat.
  • Multiple stewardship agreements signed (such as the Chippewa in MN and the Daniel Boone in KY). 
    • Multiple more in the works, including some of the following:
      • Huron-Manistee
      • GW/Jeff
      • Monongahela
      • Green Mountain
  • As @Pleasant Ridge noted, work on the North Cumberland WMA in TN leveraging chapter funds and PR money
  • Following a similar approach leveraging NC chapter and PR funds on NC gamelands in WNC
  • Multiple collaboration projects with the American Bird Conservancy on early successional habitat in various states including PA, and WI.
  • Multiple NFWF grants aimed at young forest habitat.

 

Hope this gives a decent overview for folks. As I mentioned, full 2020 highlights hitting mailboxes in the next issue. Additionally, we're working with all Forest Conservation Directors to host more regular webinar style events giving updates on their work and to solicit ideas and feedback from members.

 

Feel free to ping me with questions. 

 

Best,
Mike 

 

Director of Regional Development - Southeast 

 

Any RGS involvement in the proposed Upper Cheat River Project in the Monongahela NF?

 

https://storymaps.arcgis.com/stories/973b2edc32e448c0b567858fe6ede939?fbclid=IwAR3tJ4I46T8Q0dyCSsaOlmBRlXB58x7gDuVulqTnla9OhHT7IeYn7J48t4Q

Link to post
Share on other sites
Ol'Forester

Hey, foresters are ok!  I remember back in the day foresters were the general land managers on many if not most public lands. Wildlife biologists were staff specialists akin to soil scientists, hydrologists, entomologists, etc. Of course at that time foresters had broad course work in wildlife management, ecology, soils, plant pathology, entomology, statistics in addition to forestry classes.

 

Biologists moved into land management positions with the environmental movement of the 70’s & 80’s. I’m not saying this is all bad. I do think foresters are pretty good land managers. I also think agencies tend to have “analysis paralysis “. No doubt much of this is due to the litigious nature of our world today.

Link to post
Share on other sites
troutchops

Long time RGS member and always will be. I feel its a cheap buy in price for people that lobby for what I like. However, habitat has been their main selling point over the years. I see lots of cutting going on where I hunt, no shortage of spots. I'm not seeing anymore birds as time goes on, actually less birds. Something else seems to be missing from the equation. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Rockford Setters

Predators are one of the issues.  Avian predators are plentiful as are fur bearing ones as trapping is no longer financially rewarding with low fur prices.  the nest destroyers are plentiful, coyotes are also widespread.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Pheasant forever had stated coyotes are not bad for birds as they eat more of the nest robbers than the nesters.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Skybuster
2 hours ago, Rockford Setters said:

Predators are one of the issues.  Avian predators are plentiful as are fur bearing ones as trapping is no longer financially rewarding with low fur prices.  the nest destroyers are plentiful, coyotes are also widespread.

My 50+ years grouse hunting in northern WI would suggest predation and disease as the 1-2 punch for the recent slide in grouse contacts. We have plenty of good grouse cover.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...