Jump to content

E-Scouting Maine


Recommended Posts

Any tips? Heading to Rangeley area in October, interested in practical tools, tips, and practices to find covers to explore ahead of time. Not looking for your spots (unless you want to be kind over PM only), just help finding my own. Scout-N-Hunt? OnX? I can't seem to find a good arcGIS map of cuts and ages for anywhere in Maine, but maybe I'm looking in the wrong places. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Brad Eden

Recent Topic on ONX for further research: ONX for iPhone Topic.

 

As I have mentioned, unless ONX has upped their game for the state of Maine, the last I checked the app their private property boundaries were dismally inaccurate for mid/coastal Maine. I can’t say for certain for the western or northern part of the state.  If I went by there boundaries for my 9.5 acres, my shed and half my yard would be on my neighbors property. (Property lines professionally surveyed) But people swear by that app in most other states.

 

*Please everyone adhere to the NO HOTSPOTTING rule when adding to this Topic. Please use PM for anything even remotely specific to hunting areas. Thanks.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I just bought the Scout N Hunt app. Still figuring it out. But it seems to be ok.

Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, Brad Eden said:

Recent Topic on ONX for further research: ONX for iPhone Topic.

 

As I have mentioned, unless ONX has upped their game for the state of Maine, the last I checked the app their private property boundaries were dismally inaccurate for mid/coastal Maine. I can’t say for certain for the western or northern part of the state.  If I went by there boundaries for my 9.5 acres, my shed and half my yard would be on my neighbors property. (Property lines professionally surveyed) But people swear by that app in most other states.

 

*Please everyone adhere to the NO HOTSPOTTING rule when adding to this Topic. Please use PM for anything even remotely specific to hunting areas. Thanks.

 

I saw that thread. I had OnX previously and found it very low-value, but that was a few years ago. Same deal as you, property lines only, and not notably accurate.

 

I sure do miss the Virginia Young Forest Finder arcGIS tool!

 

Any feedback on Scout-N-Hunt is welcome, too! Ann is super nice and provided me a partial map of New Hampshire (which was GREAT, too bad I didn't hunt NH that year) after buying a couple other states and chatting over email, but I know data isn't the same state-to-state. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
ESetterSage

Unfortunately theres nothing we have (apps) that will show you the age of cuts. Unfortunately you'll have to dig deeper.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Would you guys recommend any specific gear for this trip? E.g., a CB radio for driving logging roads?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Brad Eden
1 hour ago, E.Young said:

Would you guys recommend any specific gear for this trip? E.g., a CB radio for driving logging roads?

I’m guilty of a yearly trip or two up north to drive the logging roads on paper company lands looking for partridge. I go with a couple deer hunting buddies who road sluice while I get out and take a dog down side trails and older abandoned skidder roads. The thought of having or needing a CB radio never crossed my or our minds, even though cell reception is often non existent. Just make sure you have at least 10 ply tires for the sharp shale they tend to use on those roads, a spare tire, extra water and food if you have to walk out to the major logging roads. Extra gas because you can really put a lot of miles on a vehicle trying to find your way out. Unless you venture off the secondary logging roads down some 2 track Jeep trails you shouldn’t get stuck or even need to use 4WD. But bring a shovel just in case. And always get out of the way of logging trucks. They own the roads up there.

 

A tip I’ve dispensed before. If not seeing birds in the logging roads (which you can walk up with or without a dog, flush and miss…) look for the small bridges over streams. The loggers always leave a buffer of trees and growth along stream edges. They can hold a lot of grouse, especially in dry years. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, Brad Eden said:

I’m guilty of a yearly trip or two up north to drive the logging roads on paper company lands looking for partridge. I go with a couple deer hunting buddies who road sluice while I get out and take a dog down side trails and older abandoned skidder roads. The thought of having or needing a CB radio never crossed my or our minds, even though cell reception is often non existent. Just make sure you have at least 10 ply tires for the sharp shale they tend to use on those roads, a spare tire, extra water and food if you have to walk out to the major logging roads. Extra gas because you can really put a lot of miles on a vehicle trying to find your way out. Unless you venture off the secondary logging roads down some 2 track Jeep trails you shouldn’t get stuck or even need to use 4WD. But bring a shovel just in case. And always get out of the way of logging trucks. They own the roads up there.

 

A tip I’ve dispensed before. If not seeing birds in the logging roads (which you can walk up with or without a dog, flush and miss…) look for the small bridges over streams. The loggers always leave a buffer of trees and growth along stream edges. They can hold a lot of grouse, especially in dry years. 

 

Great advice, thanks, Brad! I'd read somewhere, sometime ago, that a CB is helpful because the truck drivers will call out their milepost on Ch.16 so you'll have a heads up (and maybe also be able to reach someone if in trouble). 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Jim Vander

They dont use CB's they use MURS. I have one and found it to be  not a lot of use they dont call out all that often and even when they do they are really getting it The technology aside in Maine I try and get high and look for age differences. One of best places I have ever hunted was in the NMW where I could see break from top of mountain. Was a dead walk thru spruce for a good hour and a half till I hit the cut line. Look hard and walk a lot is about the best advice I can offer. There are birds there. Good advice above regarding navigation. Mark your way in on gps, in the dark can be damn confusing. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
drummer's stump

Western Maine uses CB radios, northern Maine uses MURS radio. Just remember the roads are private, and there is no your side of the road. Trucks have the right of way. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Just use the historical table in Google earth to find when the cuts were made and cross reference them with the Franklin Co GIS maps to get ownership of the parcel. Easy Peasy

Link to post
Share on other sites
Vermonster

You are not a real Maine bird hunter without one of these:

delorme021816-3.jpg

 

Commonly referred to shorthand as a MAG but in conversation as a "Delorme".

Published by Delorme (now owned by Garmin). You want the most up to date version, which I think for Maine is 2019.

If you are stopping at KTP or Beans on the way to Rangeley they will have them. Rangeley Region Sport Shop or one of the other stores in town might also have them.

 

Bring ammo you need. 

 

Some areas north of Rangeley see quite a bit of attention from the Border Patrol. Best to stay friendly even if they are not. If anyone is not a US citizen I would keep copies of appropriate documentation handy.

 

I don't think you'll benefit from a CB unless you know the roads well. If you are on a major dirt logging road: windows cracked (to hear truck coming), headlights on even in daytime, radio off. Generally Rangeley area is not like the Golden Road, trucks may be going 35 on major dirt roads, but not 55 and you should hear/see them coming.

 

Very little cell service outside Rangeley and then probably only Verizon or ATT (mostly Verizon except for a few spots where ATT has built out sites for first responders).

 

Brad's tip about uncut buffers along streams is a good one; this year has been very dry in that area despite a very wet summer elsewhere. I'd also add that it looks like a good wild cranberry year, make sure you/the dog works areas around these:

 

viburnum-trilobum-american-cranberrybush

Link to post
Share on other sites
GraceinVA

PM me and I have a Maine Atlas ill send you if you cover shipping. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, GraceinVA said:

PM me and I have a Maine Atlas ill send you if you cover shipping. 

 

Thank you for the offer, I just ordered the Maine Atlas last night from Garmin. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...