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I quite like small Muensterlaenders. I saw them in Germany but never here in the US.

 

 

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We had a French setter for the day at our house today.     Bentley our youngest English Setter was dressed in a neckerchief and beret for Addison’s birthday. She’s going into eighth

Tag my Braque Francais.  Not sure she's an odd breed necessarily.  But she acts odd now and then.

There are a ton of great labs and pointers on here. Love to see the springers and setters.    But how about a photo thread of some odd breeds?    For instance, this weekend I met m

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7 hours ago, airmedic1 said:

Here’s a couple pics of one of our Welsh Springer Spaniels, they are rare.  Not sure anyone has field bred Welshies which is a shame, they are good retrievers but slow to develop.  Callies is three in this pic retrieving a still alive rooster and another of her  sitting on the tail gate.97E530EC-BDF4-4D9B-B872-046CFAD01AB8.thumb.jpeg.8a9ca0207d5812a891a6d2fc65111ed4.jpeg

Ci neis.

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7 hours ago, kgb said:

 

Yes, but just barely!  One of the families in our Gordon club owns ES and Spinonis, others from time to time, so I've seen several of them and judged one at a hunt test.  I'd bet they confuse hunters who've never seen one, though.

We have had several people ask if they were a "doodle" of some sort.

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Rick Hall
6 hours ago, quailguy said:

I quite like small Muensterlaenders. I saw them in Germany but never here in the US.

 

 

 

Only one I ever hunted over was billed as a great stud dog, but I'd like to think it far from representative of its breed.

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I was surprised to see how popular the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers are with the obedience/agility crowd.  I always thought they were neat. I saw several last spring when doing puppy/obedience classes. 

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Brad Eden

IMG_0491.JPG

 

Dont you dare tell her she ain’t a hunting dog.

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I can't say they are an odd breed, although looking at how they came to be is very interesting, I once met a Boykin while hunting grouse. An old fella owned him and I was impressed with the personality and look...I've thought of owning one more than once.

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DennisMcFeely

No pics but years ago I met a guy with a long-haired Weimaraner at a NAVDHA session in MD

 

He said he flew to Germany to bring it back 

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Andrew Lam
6 hours ago, jdligon said:

I was surprised to see how popular the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers are with the obedience/agility crowd.  I always thought they were neat. I saw several last spring when doing puppy/obedience classes. 

I see two or three Tollers at most retriever hunt tests I'm at. A couple have been good. Also I saw a fair number of poodles at hunt tests. I've yet to see a good poodle though.

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3 hours ago, Rick Hall said:

 

Only one I ever hunted over was billed as a great stud dog, but I'd like to think it far from representative of its breed.

Several times small game hunting in Bavaria, one or two gunners had muensterlaneder, and honestly they performed no worse that any drathaar or kurzhaar. Although that would NOT be snappy enough for many Americans.  

 

Oddly enough. Doctor Hall, Professor of "Duckology", the best small muensterlaender I hunted over belonged to a Bavarian State Forst Meister, and we hunted ducks in a creek off the Danube River in beautiful Bayern (Bavaria.)  The way we did that was that the Forst Meister had his crew mow a path parallel to this creek, about 50 meters off the creek,  for 1 kilometer. There were paths leading down to the creek every several hundred meters. We walked along the mowed path, dropping off a gunner at every path down to the creek. When the Forst Meister reached the end of the path he knew every gunner was in position. 

The Forst Meister would then blow his hunting horn: tah rah, tah rah! And we charged the creek. At a rather sedate pace, of course for safety's sake. Each path to the creek ended at a pool on the creek, and the gunner shot every duck he could off "his" pool. The confused ducks would then fly up and down the creek, giving us additional shots.

When the shooting stopped the Forst Meister brought his Muensterlaender down the creek to pick up any remaining ducks. Whe he and his dog got to my pool I would hold up my ducks, he would ask if that was all, if not the dog would fetch them. One day, as I held up my mallards for his inspection, he asked where the rest of my ducks were. On that particular day I had shot a duck at the very head of the pool that had floated down the pool, washed under a log, then another larger log and there the dead duck remained. I pointed to the logs and told him the duck had washed up under that pile of logs: he then sent that small muensterlaender down the creek with a retrieve command.

That dog swam down the pool, sniffed the 1st log, dove under water and swam under both logs, grabbed the duck and brought it back. That remains the single most outstanding piece of water work by a dog I have ever seen. 

Now I admit of being a rather indifferent waterfowler and no doubt in my mind that many experienced watefowlers have have seen much

better performances by their dogs, but that surely impressed me. 

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bigjohnsd

The first time I went Pheasant Hunting on my own I borrowed my friends Scottish Terrier.  He found and flushed birds in yhe tule filled drainage ditch in the Sacramento Valley.  Not much of a retriever though but he did find one of the birds I shot in the fog where it had fallen I a plowed field.  

scottish-terrier-royalty-free-image-1588578796.jpg

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airmedic1
14 hours ago, Marc Ret said:

 

Callie's a pretty girl, airmedic. She has a real sweet look about her.

She is a sweetheart.  My wife likes Welshies and we have a 13 year old that is her dog.  She wanted another one and waited two years to get Callie.  She was “my” dog from the day we picked her up as a pup.  Eileen tried to hold her on the way home but she kept fidgeting and crawled over on my lap and went to sleep.  She tried to show her but Callie hated it and would go roll in the dirt after being groomed.  She did make her a certified therapy dog but she’d rather be with me where ever I am and she will going hunting every day that I go.

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shoot-straight

ran into a nice lady who had a wire-haired vizsla. big dog, much bigger and meatier than a reg viz or any that i have seen. a bit shaggier too. nice dog. she was not a hunter. 

 

you can google for pics, but think of a thicker vizsla with a beard. i loved it. 

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ccavacini

Many years ago, ran into a gentleman running a brace of Gordon Setters.  I thought they were majestic looking.

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