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Let’s See Some Mounts Or Tail-Fans


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On 10/3/2021 at 3:23 PM, Spin said:

( And they wonder where all the grouse went! )  Paw the back forty just ain't puttin out the birds it use to. Anyway I was gettin tired of eatin em 6 days a week

You can't stock pile them.   They were excellent table fare, every single one of them was delicious.  

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I have done a few this way. These are before I put the shadow box glass over them. 

I do the same as Tim.    

The gentleman in Fort Wayne, IN who did this grouse for me I believe has since passed away.     

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Tim Frazier
On 10/3/2021 at 3:23 PM, Spin said:

( And they wonder where all the grouse went! )  Paw the back forty just ain't puttin out the birds it use to. Anyway I was gettin tired of eatin em 6 days a week

It’s all a matter of math.  During the “last good years” in PA I averaged 6 miles per bird killed, ~3 for bird shot at and .5 for bird flushed.  So I would say every other trip or every 3rd trip would be a 2 bird limit.  Most days one bird in the bag.  Some days skunked.  This went on till about 2014-15 for me.  
 

Routinely one of the group shot ~ 30 birds a year which would be 180 miles or 20 days in the field, roughly 5 days a month.   (6-7 very dedicated grouse hunters of which I was the least of)
 

So even at half that, 15 birds a year, over 20 years, is 300 grouse taken.  I believe DAP had hunted grouse for ~40 years and over very good dogs during some prime years.  
 

I know other PA hunters with immaculate notes who are over 400.  
 

This has gone on for a century and I can assure you that hunting has little to do with small game populations.   
 

Most who don’t understand how someone has taken a large number of birds over a lifetime are out of shape or just plain don’t spend many days in the woods.  Serious grouse hunters are not game hogs, they aren’t lazy either.  

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Tim Frazier

Here are a couple Adirondack birds from year before last. 
 

A fellow UJ member and shop teacher did a great job on the holders!

 

 

4A72CC14-7909-4DC2-8D74-CA82ED09ED41.jpeg

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Tim Frazier

Here are the last 2 Ohio birds I shot.  I used to be able to walk across the street and hunt grouse.  Now I’m at least 3-4 hours from anywhere worth even taking a walk. 

68CDA621-FEF3-40E2-A90A-129344C3C42B.jpeg
 

Sadly most of the Ohio birds I shot I never thought about as trophies.  Wish I would have saved a few more Ohio tails.  

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12 hours ago, Tim Frazier said:

This has gone on for a century and I can assure you that hunting has little to do with small game populations.   

I'd argue this point but circumstantially. When numbers are quite low and bird population (locally or somewhat locally) and are subject to other limiting factors, forage, weather, disease, etc., hunting pressure IMO can be another nail in the coffin.

Isolated populations where suitable habitat and conditions retain marginal numbers and especially years low in the cycle and that may experience other unusual stress or predation.  These pocket populations are certainly at risk from being over hunted. In marginal areas it may mean the end of the presence of these smaller wild populations. My area of Wisconsin is a example of this though I want to say that habitat loss is in my opinion, as big if not in most cases a bigger a problem. Again however, just one additional nail in the coffin.

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Tim Frazier
14 hours ago, Spin said:

I'd argue this point but circumstantially. When numbers are quite low and bird population (locally or somewhat locally) and are subject to other limiting factors, forage, weather, disease, etc., hunting pressure IMO can be another nail in the coffin.

Isolated populations where suitable habitat and conditions retain marginal numbers and especially years low in the cycle and that may experience other unusual stress or predation.  These pocket populations are certainly at risk from being over hunted. In marginal areas it may mean the end of the presence of these smaller wild populations. My area of Wisconsin is a example of this though I want to say that habitat loss is in my opinion, as big if not in most cases a bigger a problem. Again however, just one additional nail in the coffin.

Ya it’s hard to argue that isolated population isn’t more vulnerable to any insult be it hunting or disease.  It’s lack of contiguous habitat that makes the population isolated in most cases though so ultimately they are doomed hunting or not.  
 

Our farms population of grouse was in this predicament and for years I only used them for training.  Then one year we flushed 5 in an hours time and I told a buddy I might shoot one the next fall as it seemed they were doing OK.  We never saw another grouse on the farm and a year after that in the county.   I have spent many hours over the last 15 years in good tracking snow with an experienced dog in a nearby 6,000 acre wilderness area just trying to cut a track and have yet too.   Plenty of good habitat.  So there are other factors as well but hunting did not extirpate grouse from our county in Ohio IMHO

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Swampy 16

I remember living in WV back in the early 90’s in the Salem area, not far from Ohio. There were plenty of grouse and the cover in southern Ohio was spectacular. Never hunted it but people we new said the hunting was excellent.

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