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Barbed wire.


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Craig Conroy

NW Wisconsin also has a lot of old farms, with old wire still present, some times grown into pretty big trees that were saplings when it was nailed to them.  At least it's weathered away enough to not be as sharp barbed as it once was.  I've had only one dog that had to go on IR as a result of an encounter, though.  She somehow scored the inside of her left hind leg, with a two inch hole in the skin and about an eight inch gash on the underlying muscle.  Of course, she didn't say a word about it at the time.  She needed a bunch of stitches and a drain tube, was on IR for about three weeks.   But the worst injury she got was from running into, with a minor assist from my other Lab, a fire number sign mounted on a steel fence post.  The vet said he'd never seen a dog hurt like that that hadn't been hit by something.  Another 3 weeks on IR.  I should add that when the vet added on to his building, I told him he should name the new wing after Shea, since she paid for a lot of it 😉.

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Coincidentally, just yesterday I was driving back out a 2-track after hunting a spot and came across a fawn tangled up in a barbed wire fence.  It wasn't there 2 hours earlier when I drove in.  Surpri

I got into a discussion with a guy this past week about the inherent dangers of running hunting dogs in this part of WI.  OK, it was an argument really. The guy is from the Twin Cities, which is relev

It isn't the well maintained fences that cause the biggest issues for me, dogs seem to learn about them quickly. It's the old coiled up discarded wire that gets them the worst. I haven't seen much at

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Jazz4Brazo

This is the kind of stuff that would keep me up at night...absolutely burns me up to find garbage/waste dumps and assorted rusted drums, cans, broken glass in the woods...barbed wire freaks me out.

 

J4B 

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1 hour ago, Brad Eden said:

 

 

3, Abandoned uncovered dug wells. The previously mentioned abandoned homesteads are now empty granite rock foundations and there is always a dug well somewhere close by. I have encountered plenty and have found dead deer floating and Jake fell in one, but it was after heavy rain and it was filled and he scrambled out. I try and drag in a pallet or cover with logs if I can.

 

This always gives me the creeps and I'm constantly on the look out for abandoned wells here in NC PA.  I've actually built covers for a few that I've run onto over the years.

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Greg Hartman

Poor pup! Joy got hit with &^%$# buried wire two days ago and, after being stitched up, etc., will be on the IR for a while, leaving us with only one Dog Power for hunting.

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Wells really scare me, about 30 years I fell partway thru a rotted cover over one on my neighbors land.

 

it could of been really bad. I doubt anyone could of found me.

 

I hired a heavy equipment operator to fill it with my neighbors permission.

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Years ago barbed wire cost me $350 to have my dogger's chest stitched up, ouch!

 

Old hay tines covered by grass is another hazard; dog comes running through and get impaled. 

 

And if hunting old abandon farms, be really careful of rotted out wooden covers that lay across old well openings or underground cisterns,  those make for a bit of "oh Sh**" moments as well. 

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Kansas Big Dog

My dogs run thru barb wire many times daily while hunting. They have figured out to go under it and frequently get scratches on their backs, but no injuries. But, I keep them away from new fences. Those fences are taunter and sharper than old rusty fences. I've never had a cut that I had to tend to or take to the vet from barb wire. Junk piles, old machinery and such I keep away from as best we can. I know a few coveys of huns and quail that I won't hunt as the birds always fly into the junk pile area. The biggest injuries my dogs have had are from locust tree thorns. Those things can get 3"+. I've had dogs run thru a locust grove and a locust thorn will pierce their ears and the momentum of the dog causes the thorn to rip thru causing a big slice in the ear. Very bloody. One time Belle, Perk's dog, riped her ear right before she pointed a covey of quail . Ghastly sight seeing your dog on point with blood gusting from the ear. I shot one on the covey rise and she retrieved it and I tried to get her back to the truck. She pointed two more singles on the way to the truck. So, I avoid locust grove areas too.

 

I also avoid cattle guards. I've known other hunters that have had dogs break legs trying to go over a cattle guard. I make may dogs go under the fence at the side of a cattle guard.

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SelbyLowndes

I can't stand looking at pictures of those hurt dogs, make me hurt just looking at them.

Bob-wire is disappearing somewhat here in the South.  Have you ever noticed that the wood on many old sxs guns is marred just in front of the trigger guard?  That's from using that part of the gun to push down the middle strand of a bob-wire fence to get through it. That's what I think anyway...SelbyLowndes 

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mister grouse

This pic from @six years ago after  one of my last great setters made an error in judgement on wire and had a vet trip and got the C O S plus a gawd -awful pink vet wrap to remind her of the error of her ways.    But with additional homemade armor she was back after them in a couple days  — assuming the old English setter pose.  Actually she was so close she knew it was time to get down low so they don’t see me.  She knows that her sister behind her is laughing at her.

C4C7390A-7C8D-4046-A2A4-A37CDCE61C9F.jpeg

F2AA95DF-6601-42EC-B791-0AAC2D64D6DA.jpeg

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On 9/12/2021 at 4:49 PM, SODAKer said:

Years ago barbed wire cost me $350 to have my dogger's chest stitched up, ouch!

 

Old hay tines covered by grass is another hazard; dog comes running through and get impaled. 

 

And if hunting old abandon farms, be really careful of rotted out wooden covers that lay across old well openings or underground cisterns,  those make for a bit of "oh Sh**" moments as well. 

You had an "incident" with a well in Sask. a few years ago. But all's well that ends well!

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On 9/12/2021 at 2:35 PM, bobman said:

Wells really scare me, about 30 years I fell partway thru a rotted cover over one on my neighbors land.

 

it could of been really bad. I doubt anyone could of found me.

 

I hired a heavy equipment operator to fill it with my neighbors permission.

Around 20 years ago A good friend of mine and I were hunting grouse in some real backwoods areas of the UP and Johnathon's big male Spin Guido slipped backwards into a good sized, rock walled hole when we were crossing a big boulder field. The dog had no hope of getting out by himself and Johnathon had to climb down inside the thing to get the dog out along with my help. With the big angular rocks along the bottom and the gaps here and there between the boulders and scree Guido was lucky he didn't get hurt when he went in backwards. It took the two of us together to get a 90 some pound dog up and out of that hole and fishing Johnny up and out after the dog.

    It's something I would never of imagined as a hazard to watch out for in that part of the country, but there it was!

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shoot-straight

Ive had a few close calls with wells and barbed wire, but the worst was abandoned razor wire on a army base. it was so rusted you could barely tell it was there. luckily as soon as i saw it i told the dog to stay. it was literally 220 degrees or so around us. i picked him up, walked to truck and never set foot there again. 

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Two things scare me in the woods of New England--barbed wire and open wells/cisterns.

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