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Barbed wire.


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ESetterSage

I always carry sections of rope just in case I had to use my shirt as a hammock to hoist up.

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Coincidentally, just yesterday I was driving back out a 2-track after hunting a spot and came across a fawn tangled up in a barbed wire fence.  It wasn't there 2 hours earlier when I drove in.  Surpri

I got into a discussion with a guy this past week about the inherent dangers of running hunting dogs in this part of WI.  OK, it was an argument really. The guy is from the Twin Cities, which is relev

It isn't the well maintained fences that cause the biggest issues for me, dogs seem to learn about them quickly. It's the old coiled up discarded wire that gets them the worst. I haven't seen much at

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Jazz4Brazo

OK here goes.... 

 

Buckshot/Slugs/spare pistol...check

Heavy Wire cutters/Oversized Zip ties...check

Dog vet kit with benadryl, stapler, etc....check

Extra Water/Instant Cold packs/Thermometer...check

Extra rope/Dog Carrier...check

Thermal Blanket/Matches...check

Garmin InReach...check

plus all the regular hunitng/dog crap we carry...check

 

UTV to carry it all 🤪...wonder how we all go out...it's scary out there based on all the threads on going right now but somehow we persevere!!

 

I don't really carry everything above (all in jest)...usually a subset plus some other stuff in the truck including get out of trouble sh!t (now 4Runner) but these threads are helpful to think about what to prepare for in advance.

 

Stay safe everyone,

J4B

 

 

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Typically the open wells I come across are open or brush has grown over the opening. They were once covered with a wooden cap which deteriorated over time.  

 

I found this unusual concrete capped open well at an abandoned and grown over homestead a couple years back while turkey hunting. The only thing besides stonewalls to indicate a farmhouse once stood there was a granite rock foundation and a few apple trees. I had stopped hunting my dogs in that piece due to people dumping construction debris and glass etc. I had never come across it before and both me and the dogs had been within yards of it. Under the cap it was the typical round hand dug granite rock lined well. I covered it with branches etc. Scary business. But them ruffed grouse and Woodcock take us to places that are irresistible.

 

IMG_0720.JPG
 

IMG_0721.JPG

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OutlawTorn

Hate barbed wire - I avoid it like the plague, even if it means I miss out on a good opportunity.  But, sometimes it's just not where you expect it to be.

 

I've also found old wells like Brad, one in particular was in the middle of a public hunting area in SD, completely hidden by tall grass, uncovered and about 3 feet across.  No close calls or anything, but scared me to think they are out there once I saw it.

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VizslavsBird

john mcg

 

I'm in a very different part of the world than your photo of a cistern.  Around here (arid southwest) it's a hole in the ground next to a house or barn used to catch rain water for future use.  Normally 6 to 12 feet deep, 4 foot diameter rock walls with plaster lining.  The portion above the ground would be about 3 feet high and only kept stuff out of the water.  

 

Would you please describe that photo cistern?

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Hard to say how deep it was when built. It is stone lined and a guess would be originally 4 to 5 feet above grade. A great many years to raise grade and fill with detris. Based on observations over the years, I would say it is spring fed as it never dries. It is next to a long gone home and barn.

That plot of land has a very long history and was once touted as the most remarkable homestead in NH.

I wouldnt be surprised if there was a structure over it and used for reserve water for fires and as a spring house, although that would be larger than a typical colonial era spring house. I have never seen one like it.

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3 hours ago, Brad Eden said:

Typically the open wells I come across are open or brush has grown over the opening. They were once covered with a wooden cap which deteriorated over time.  

 

I found this unusual concrete capped open well at an abandoned and grown over homestead a couple years back while turkey hunting. The only thing besides stonewalls to indicate a farmhouse once stood there was a granite rock foundation and a few apple trees. I had stopped hunting my dogs in that piece due to people dumping construction debris and glass etc. I had never come across it before and both me and the dogs had been within yards of it. Under the cap it was the typical round hand dug granite rock lined well. I covered it with branches etc. Scary business. But them ruffed grouse and Woodcock take us to places that are irresistible.

 

IMG_0720.JPG
 

IMG_0721.JPG

Brad

is that a well, or was it a cistern. When I was a kid we had something similar except it had a metal cover similar to a manhole cover.

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Wes Stueber
6 hours ago, shoot-straight said:

Ive had a few close calls with wells and barbed wire, but the worst was abandoned razor wire on a army base. it was so rusted you could barely tell it was there. luckily as soon as i saw it i told the dog to stay. it was literally 220 degrees or so around us. i picked him up, walked to truck and never set foot there again. 

shoot-straight,

 

I can relate to razor wire on Army posts!  Years ago we were quail hunting on Fort Riley, KS and constantly was running into wire.  It was unbelievable!  We DO NOT hunt there any more...  They had quail, but also a LOT of wire all over.  How my dogs made it out of there w/o being cut up is a miracle!

 

I've told the tale of having a dog fall into a partially covered well on this site before.  He disappeared on me and never barked once.  Luckily, my old hunting partner went back there a few days later and his Brittany stopped @ the well and he went to a neighbor, who luckily was a fire fighter and had a long ladder & ropes to go down & get him out.  That night, my buddy called to ask," hey, do you still need a dog"?  I owed him after that call.  We never did figure out how he fell in it as it was covered pretty good w/ RR ties.  (Due to encroaching housing, that was another good quail area we lost a bit later.)

 

Wells AND barb, or Razor wire, are hated by me...

 

Brittman

 

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9 hours ago, airmedic1 said:

Brad

is that a well, or was it a cistern. When I was a kid we had something similar except it had a metal cover similar to a manhole cover.

Deep hand dug well. The thing that was different than most around here was the concrete top with hole. This area was once a granite quarry industry in the 30’s and 40’s. The bases of the local mountains are pockmarked with remnants of homes and homesteads.

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There are few places that I hunt that have NO barbed wire. My dogs (and most peoples' dogs, I expect) have learned to avoid barbed wire in all its forms - standing up or laying abandoned. I worry more about open mine shafts, snakes, and other bio hazards...

 

There are so many hazards in the field that we are gambling every time we put a dog on the ground.  About the only thing that you can do is to be prepared to deal with possible injuries.

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VizslavsBird

I will take barb wire any day over all the dirty diapers and piles of human feces I encountered the last time I hunted Mearns quail in a National Forrest

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5 hours ago, VizslavsBird said:

I will take barb wire any day over all the dirty diapers and piles of human feces I encountered the last time I hunted Mearns quail in a National Forrest

 

welcome to the BORDER lands... and the current reality.

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