Jump to content

SD and ND trespass fee hunting


Recommended Posts

Doubleplay

We generally hunt the plots and public lands for pheasants but try to hit private ground for couple days every year. We meaning my wife and I and our two springers.

Lost my contact from years past in ND and we are looking for private land  trespass or daily fee either in SD or ND for late October period for 2-3 days.

Please, PM me if you know someone or a place. I trust the members here more than the web wide search which is mostly commercial.

Thanks

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 58
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • bennelli-banger

    16

  • Chukarman

    8

  • Doubleplay

    5

  • Dave Quindt

    5

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

The more people who are willing to pay a trespass fee, the more private land will be off-limits to local hunters.

I've knocked on doors in MT, OR, WA, CA. Never been asked to pay a trespass fee. If you are knocking cold calls you might be asked because they don't know you from Adam. If I can say that a neighbor o

In every state hunting regulation booklet there’s a section with a reminder to respect private property and the safety and sensibility of landowners. Got no problem with that.    I just wish th

The more people who are willing to pay a trespass fee, the more private land will be off-limits to local hunters.

Link to post
Share on other sites
bennelli-banger

You could call the chamber of commerce of the town you’re near…

Link to post
Share on other sites

It's not difficult to knock on doors in the Dakotas and be asked to pay a fee. Just look for some of the best cover in a heavily hunted area. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've knocked on doors in MT, OR, WA, CA. Never been asked to pay a trespass fee. If you are knocking cold calls you might be asked because they don't know you from Adam. If I can say that a neighbor or local friend of the rancher suggested that I call on them then my chances are FAR BETTER. I ask for permission for TODAY, not forever. I chat as much as they want - up to an hour or more. I always say that I grew up in ranching country, which is true. MOST PEOPLE want to say yes but require reassurance that they are making the right decision.

 

This part of hunting is Sales101 .

Link to post
Share on other sites

Listen to Chukarman.  He knows what he is talking about.  For many years, I have hunted the Dakotas and Montana and never been asked to pay a trespass fee.  Moreover, when I go to the door looking presentable, explaining who I and my son are, where we're from, what we do for a living and so on while politely asking if I and my son may hunt. we have never been turned down.  What the rancher or farmer wants is a chance to size you up and get a sense of whether he or she could trust you.  When handling things this way, it often ends up in a bit of a visit which doesn't hurt a thing other maybe shorten your time a little.  More than often, we end up being invited in for some coffee, sometimes invited to eat, or just plain visit like we did with an older couple in Montana who hadn't had a visitor for awhile.  Turned out their place had the best Sharptail on the whole hunt.  When money starts getting thrown around offering to pay a "trespass fee", doors start closing for the local guys and for others as well who can't afford the fees.  What we do instead is to do something more on the personal level for the farmer or rancher.  This has gotten us farther down the road than throwing around cash. What I'm talking about is to act like gentlemen who appreciate the privelege while you're hunting and then afterward stopping back by and thanking folks for letting you go.  Other ways for us have included rounding up stray cattle that have gotten out of a fence, sending a followup thank you note or card at Xmas, leaving a little gift or sending one later after the hunt or during the holidays, giving a rancher a ride to town to get his vehicle and so on.  We've found over the years that focusing on the "personal touch" means a heck-of-a- lot to folks.  Many, many of the farmers and ranchers we've sought out things we could do for them have developed into lifetime friends whether it was here at home or in some other state.    

Link to post
Share on other sites

I always look for something around the ranch/farm to compliment or question the owner about. Anything to start a conversation except, "Can I hunt?". When we get around to hunting, I explain where I've been and that I haven't been having much luck. (That's usually why I'm knocking.) Finally, I ask them for help finding birds. It's really difficult for someone to not offer help.  They may not let me hunt, but they will always send me in a direction that they've seen birds.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I concur with Cman, Grey Dog and Randy. I've always tried to find something in common with folks on whose land I seek permission to hunt. I grew up with cattle and farming and ranching, so with folks in SD where we usually hunt, it's easy to talk about something in common. I also, to the chagrin perhaps of my brother and friend, like to talk, so I'll spend time talking with the folks listening to their stories or tell a few stories of my own. My friend, as I mentioned in another post, usually has  number of boxes of potatoes he's gleaned from the potato fields of S. ID, so we offer a box to those who let us hunt their property along with an assortment of sausages I make from venison or elk. We've even taken some out to dinner, to their favorite local restaurant, which is also a great way for them to get to know us and likewise, we to become better acquainted with them.

 

I also, in the past, have written a letter or sent Christmas cards to an older couple who have let us hunt their property, yearly. On those years I haven't made it back there hunting, whereas, my friend and brother have, they've always asked where I am, why I'm not there and how I'm doing, etc, according to what my brother or friend tells me. Genuinely taking an interest in the farmer/ranchers life has turned into  friendships, that to me is much more satisfying than being allowed onto their property to perhaps  shoot a limit of birds.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Doubleplay
19 hours ago, Chukarman said:

The more people who are willing to pay a trespass fee, the more private land will be off-limits to local hunters.

I hear you but I'm not talking about paying $100's. Just  showing appreciation for the permission and paying a reasonable fee or a gift. We don't mind knocking on doors and did that a lot in various areas. Specially when I have my wife with me she'll be the one knocking which makes even a better impression. However when you drive from East Coast and have limited time it's harder to waste time to knocking on doors. That's why we always try to set up something ahead and don't mind paying a little or hunt public land. I wish we had more time to knock on doors.

Link to post
Share on other sites
bennelli-banger

Ever hear the phrase, “if you’re not paying for sex, you’re paying way too much!”?   Well, after nearly 3 decades of building relationships, and doing all the graduations, weddings, funerals, etc, I wonder if I’d be further ahead just paying for land access!!   Kidding, I enjoy the relationships immensely, but I understand both sides.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Doubleplay said:

I hear you but I'm not talking about paying $100's. Just  showing appreciation for the permission and paying a reasonable fee or a gift. We don't mind knocking on doors and did that a lot in various areas. Specially when I have my wife with me she'll be the one knocking which makes even a better impression. However when you drive from East Coast and have limited time it's harder to waste time to knocking on doors. That's why we always try to set up something ahead and don't mind paying a little or hunt public land. I wish we had more time to knock on doors.

For many years I drove from northern California to Montana, Oregon, South Dakota, Saskatchewan, even Michigan. Now I drive (when I do) to those places from SE Arizona - even longer. I just returned from a fishing trip to Fort Smth, MT and it was 1460 miles door to door.

 

I very seldom use a guide or outfitter, never pay access fees, and I consider knocking on doors as dues to be paid.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Dave Quindt

In every state hunting regulation booklet there’s a section with a reminder to respect private property and the safety and sensibility of landowners. Got no problem with that. 
 

I just wish the next section was a reminder to private property holders that the game that occupies their land is not theirs, that they don’t have any more right to it than some city slicker, and that it’s held in the public trust for all to enjoy and benefit from. 
 

Probably wouldn’t do a damn bit of good but would make me feel a bit better. 
 

JMO,

Dave

Link to post
Share on other sites
bennelli-banger

You don’t have much in the way of game if you don’t choose to leave some ground unplanted…and there’s a cost to that.   Focus strictly on land that’s planted ditch to ditch, no habitat…see how you do.   Sure, some birds may be in there feeding, but I shoot birds in grass, trees, cattails, food plots…stuff that makes the landowner very little $….maybe others do well in a sea of 100% crops… 

     I put a quarter section in a permanent conservation easement…I get calls from the adjacent farmers wanting permission for deer hunting…the critters need habitat, not just picked beans, or corn, or wheat, etc…the guy who chooses not to farm some of his acreage is making a financial sacrifice to do so.  Not saying the critters are his, but they wouldn’t be there if he farmed ditch to ditch.  Economics have influenced the demise of CRP over the past 10-20 years…the cost to buy or rent land is just the beginning…and that alone is a huge nut… 

    I’ve driven across Ohio, Indiana, Illinois a lot in the past 4 years…haven’t seen much habitat or wildlife…lots of crop land, though. 
   I drive miles and miles of pure crop land—no fence lines, even—to get to my ground…no game, basically…get to my area, where there are other similarly-minded landowners, and also, some WMA’s, and game appears…there’s a causal relationship.   I’ve hunted this area for close to 30 years, and many farms that used to have crp but are now crops only have ZERO birds now.  Zero.   I wish there was still CRP everywhere…not in my lifetime!🥲

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Chukarman said:

For many years I drove from northern California to Montana, Oregon, South Dakota, Saskatchewan, even Michigan. Now I drive (when I do) to those places from SE Arizona - even longer. I just returned from a fishing trip to Fort Smth, MT and it was 1460 miles door to door.

 

I very seldom use a guide or outfitter, never pay access fees, and I consider knocking on doors as dues to be paid.

I have friends that have had just the opposite experience in North Dakota and one of them was born and raised there. This was around 20 years back but Don grew up in North Dakota and still had family living in the area. They figured understandably that getting permission would be pretty easy. Not so, It seemed that things had changed and to make it worse leased hunting had caught on big in that area. Don told me they were shocked as time and again they were told no or it was a yes - for $200.00 to $300.00 a day, per person, straight faced and dead serious. And no guarantees of any kind on finding birds. They spent most of 1 day trying to get on some private land without getting fleeced then gave up and decided to try hunting public land. They did and connected with birds and had a good enough time but it was a real culture shock for them particularly Don who guessed between the land owners leasing out hunting rights and at least a couple of land holders who might of figured he didn't really want out of state hunters on his place but figured "What have I got to lose?" and said Sure $200.00 bucks and Deep Pockets coughed up the Dough without blinking. Anyway they weren't the only ones that had similar experiences either though prices may have differed. I cannot speak for myself about the Dakotas and points west of Iowa but While a young guy in my late teens and early twenties I spent whole weekends driving around trying to get advance permission to hunt properties for the season.

    I succeeded well enough but put one hell of a lot of time, miles and effort to get permission and keep it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now



×
×
  • Create New...