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SD and ND trespass fee hunting


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On 9/28/2021 at 6:31 PM, Dave Quindt said:

I just wish the next section was a reminder to private property holders that the game that occupies their land is not theirs, that they don’t have any more right to it than some city slicker, and that it’s held in the public trust for all to enjoy and benefit from. 
 

Probably wouldn’t do a damn bit of good but would make me feel a bit better. 
 

JMO,

Dave

I don't understand what you are saying.  Is it that landowners should let everyone on their property or that the landowner should do all he can to drive the game off his property to open access land?  Color me confused. 

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The more people who are willing to pay a trespass fee, the more private land will be off-limits to local hunters.

I've knocked on doors in MT, OR, WA, CA. Never been asked to pay a trespass fee. If you are knocking cold calls you might be asked because they don't know you from Adam. If I can say that a neighbor o

In every state hunting regulation booklet there’s a section with a reminder to respect private property and the safety and sensibility of landowners. Got no problem with that.    I just wish th

Dave Quindt
1 minute ago, Big Al said:

I don't understand what you are saying.  Is it that landowners should let everyone on their property or that the landowner should do all he can to drive the game off his property to open access land?  Color me confused. 

It's that landowners should remember that the game is owned by all of us and is to be shared, not commoditized.   If we are going to remind folks to respect private property we should also remind folks to respect wildlife managed in the public trust.

 

Personally, I think it should be illegal for landowners to take cash in exchange for hunting access if they are also taking money for any conservation program (e.g. CRP, EQIP, etc) but realize that will never happen due to the power of the ag lobby and challenges regarding enforcement.  

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1 hour ago, Dave Quindt said:

Personally, I think it should be illegal for landowners to take cash in exchange for hunting access if they are also taking money for any conservation program (e.g. CRP, EQIP, etc) but realize that will never happen due to the power of the ag lobby and challenges regarding enforcement.  

So these landowners should be ineligible for the Montana BMA program.

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ccavacini
On 9/28/2021 at 8:18 AM, Randy S said:

I always look for something around the ranch/farm to compliment or question the owner about. 

So, saying, "I saw your daughter, and, man, she's smokin' hot.  My compliments.  Can I hunt?" is probably not a good idea.

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Dave Quindt
2 minutes ago, Big Al said:

So these landowners should be ineligible for the Montana BMA program.

Block management is barely a conservation program; it's really a recreation and economic development program.  

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bennelli-banger
5 hours ago, Doubleplay said:

We don't hunt anything but wild birds and have 40 years experience to tell one from the other! Specially the pheasants with holes on their beaks.

     I was referring to the guy that does the pay to hunt deal…likely doesn’t realize he’s shooting released birds…

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sbertram
3 hours ago, ccavacini said:

So, saying, "I saw your daughter, and, man, she's smokin' hot.  My compliments.  Can I hunt?" is probably not a good idea.

Hard saying really, have you seen the size of some of those girls in the Dakota's? Likely the only time the farmer ever heard that about his daughter. Careful or you may find yourself hitched. Dakota girls, warmth in the winter and shade in the summer.

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sbertram
1 hour ago, bennelli-banger said:

     I was referring to the guy that does the pay to hunt deal…likely doesn’t realize he’s shooting released birds…

Depends on where really, many of the pay for access small farms are strictly wild birds. Most states require a special license for someone to release birds and charge to hunt where paying for access to hunt wild birds does not require such a license. Plenty of the ranchers in the area I hunt in SD charge to hunt but none of them release birds.

 

I

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bennelli-banger
1 minute ago, sbertram said:

Depends on where really, many of the pay for access small farms are strictly wild birds. Most states require a special license for someone to release birds and charge to hunt where paying for access to hunt wild birds does not require such a license. Plenty of the ranchers in the area I hunt in SD charge to hunt but none of them release birds.

 

I

Right…I know quite a few that do release birds, and would be confident that they haven’t obtained any special license.  I’d say the size of the farm and how much of it is in actual habitat tells the story.   Most of the guys that I know who do it just want the hunt wrapped up within a few hours so they can get on with their day…they’re paying $15-20 per rooster, and usually getting $200+ per gun.  Most of the time the groups are 6-10 hunters, and the birds are released in very well defined food plots or corn strips that have no cover adjacent to them to keep the birds confined.   Not my cup of tea, but it allows more of their ground to be farmed, and reduces the amount of time they are tied up with the hunters.

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Don Steese
On 9/27/2021 at 7:52 PM, Chukarman said:

I've knocked on doors in MT, OR, WA, CA. Never been asked to pay a trespass fee. If you are knocking cold calls you might be asked because they don't know you from Adam. If I can say that a neighbor or local friend of the rancher suggested that I call on them then my chances are FAR BETTER. I ask for permission for TODAY, not forever. I chat as much as they want - up to an hour or more. I always say that I grew up in ranching country, which is true. MOST PEOPLE want to say yes but require reassurance that they are making the right decision.

 

This part of hunting is Sales101 .

I agree Mike and have even had land owners see me in the field with my dogs and stopping to chat and end up inviting me to hunt their land. Ben Hong and I made some very good friends up in Saskatchewan that way. They'd invite us to their house every year for Canadian Thanksgiving, give us veggies from their truck patch, and be upset if we didn't show up. All started when the landowner stopped to chat. The one exception might be South Dakota where a lot of farmers seem to have discovered that pheasants are a cash crop.

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Chukarman

Don, I hunted South Dakota once with a friend who insisted that I go along. This was at the peak of the pheasant 'boom' that happened several years ago. I was hunting in Montana, so I figured that I could go over there (near Mitchell)  for a few days. It was a farm hunt with lodging and meals. it was ridiculous - there were pheasants EVERYWHERE. I shot a limit before breakfast one morning when I took my dog and walked about 400 yards down the farm road. Nearby, a farmer was harvesting corn... pheasants were pouring out in front of the harvester like a cloud of grasshoppers. Too many pheasants to work my setter in any reasonable way. I didn't consider this hunting. Mostly just shooting.

 

I am not really a pheasant hunter and prefer to hunt Sharptails, Huns, chukars, quail or forest grouse.

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WyomingArt
On 9/28/2021 at 6:26 PM, bennelli-banger said:

BTW, I know no less than 10 farm families that are trying to bring another family into the operation…the 3rd generation in some cases…try to pencil it out…health insurance at 15k annually (or more) is just the start…land rent at $200+ per acre, fuel, seed, fertilizer, equipment, crop insurance, etc, etc…sure, there are some safety nets, but $ ain’t falling from the trees!!!   It easily costs $500/acre to grow corn when you’re renting ground…this year, they’re hoping to get 100 bushels…corn was at $7, doubt it is now…$5.50?   Storing it isn’t free…you may need an 80k bin, or, pay the elevator…then you’re rolling the dice…

B-B  has good numbers: 

 

Our family farm stayed in the family for about 115 years.  Farming is like playing poker with really big chips. 

I don't fault a man for trying to make a buck of his fallow land, slough, or hedgerows.

 

His prices may not be affordable on my budget, but I won't find fault with him. I don't know his debt load, how much he has in the bank, his fixed and recurrent expenses, or what cattle or grain prices will be come shipping or harvest, but I know how hard he works and the risk he takes on. Corn is bouncing around $ 5.40, wheat $7.50. Sounds like a lot until you pencil in the overhead like Bennelli Banger points out. 

 

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WyomingArt

Dark humor about agriculture and indirectly the price of trespass fees for hunting,  " We practiced scientific farming on our place,  that's called farm 'till you're broke." 

 

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VizslavsBird
1 hour ago, WyomingArt said:

Our family farm stayed in the family for about 115 years.  Farming is like playing poker with really big chips. 

I don't fault a man for trying to make a buck of his fallow land, slough, or hedgerows.

 

His prices may not be affordable on my budget, but I won't find fault with him. I don't know his debt load, how much he has in the bank, his fixed and recurrent expenses, or what cattle or grain prices will be come shipping or harvest, but I know how hard he works and the risk he takes on. Corn is bouncing around $ 5.40, wheat $7.50. Sounds like a lot until you pencil in the overhead like Bennelli Banger points out. 

 

I would like to thank you for one of the most well thought out post ever presented on Upland Journal.

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Don Steese
3 hours ago, Chukarman said:

Don, I hunted South Dakota once with a friend who insisted that I go along. This was at the peak of the pheasant 'boom' that happened several years ago. I was hunting in Montana, so I figured that I could go over there (near Mitchell)  for a few days. It was a farm hunt with lodging and meals. it was ridiculous - there were pheasants EVERYWHERE. I shot a limit before breakfast one morning when I took my dog and walked about 400 yards down the farm road. Nearby, a farmer was harvesting corn... pheasants were pouring out in front of the harvester like a cloud of grasshoppers. Too many pheasants to work my setter in any reasonable way. I didn't consider this hunting. Mostly just shooting.

 

I am not really a pheasant hunter and prefer to hunt Sharptails, Huns, chukars, quail or forest grouse.

My thoughts exactly, but some folks look at you funny when you say you aren't interested in hunting South Dakota because there are "too many birds!"

I also much prefer hunting sharptails and Huns, but I'm a bit odd. Since I don't hunt back east anymore the one bird I miss most are woodcock. How many would admit that??

I also don't exactly agree with those who say that pheasants are much more difficult for a pointing dog. Yes, they do run but once a rooster decides to hold in thick cover a dog can get right on top of them and they won't budge. Just my limited experience. Mearns quail are probably the most challenging I've found for a pointing dog.

All that having been said I plan on being out there chasing those gaudy buggers come Saturday!😉

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