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On 11/24/2021 at 11:25 PM, Geoff Roznak said:

Same here.  I didn't touch a rod lighter than 6 wt. (other than casting practice) all season.

Sell that rod, and buy an 8 wt. Helios with the $$$.  Trust me.

 

 

🤣

Been there.

It's worse when fly is a musky fly, and the "leaf" is 40"+ and has teeth as big as the finger nail on your little finger...

For me, anyway...

 

 

I got the full set 8-10 and a Recon 7 and 8. Trust me, ain't no lack of fly rods in my basement. 

 

And on the musky, while I've yet to have the good fortune of hooking one... at least you got an honest take by a fish! I've lost a lot of big bluefish on cut-offs, and along with them, the $25 plugs they hit. Hurts, but at least I know what they like.

 

A few weeks ago, we were fishing before work. I launched a 9" Doc and the line snapped. it was bobbing around in a cove so we went to recover. 10yd out from the lure, an absolute would-be personal best bluefish came all the way out of the water to hit the plug and then they were both gone. We just looked at each other, totally speechless. 

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Geoff Roznak
22 minutes ago, E.Young said:

And on the musky, while I've yet to have the good fortune of hooking one... at least you got an honest take by a fish!

We get a lot - relatively - of musky in the boat.  With what I got, and what people fishing with me got, over 30 for the season.

...If you are looking for the bar-none, absolutely best musky fly rod out there, with no compromises, Tom Schenk's one piece Predator rods are the choice.

Nothing - seriously - comes close, and I've owned many, and tried most of the competition.  I own them in 8, 10 and 12 wt. 

The 8 wt. throws like the Helios 8...but smoother, and with more power.  It handles bigger flies with less effort...and I own an H3 8 wt. that gets tons of hours throwing bass-sized poppers.

The 10 wt. throws like most 12s, but lighter in the hand than most 9s...and is butter smooth delivering 10" - 12" flies...

...and the 12 wt (which weighs within a fraction of an ounce of the 10) is for the really big stuff over 12".

A link, in case anyone is interested: https://crcustomrod.com/collections/fly/products/predatory-fly-rod-810?variant=32888795136135

 

I've owned, and fished over 20 10 wt. fly rods, many that claimed to be "the best" for musky...not one is built specifically for the task buy by a guy who actually gets out there and does it...one easy way to check: If the rod has metal guides, it won't stand up...

Sorry to go off on a tangent...it's kind of a passion of mine...

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Getting started already for next year, though I don’t usually get at it until after Christmas. All Atlantic salmon flies.

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On 11/26/2021 at 12:08 AM, Geoff Roznak said:

We get a lot - relatively - of musky in the boat.  With what I got, and what people fishing with me got, over 30 for the season.

...If you are looking for the bar-none, absolutely best musky fly rod out there, with no compromises, Tom Schenk's one piece Predator rods are the choice.

Nothing - seriously - comes close, and I've owned many, and tried most of the competition.  I own them in 8, 10 and 12 wt. 

The 8 wt. throws like the Helios 8...but smoother, and with more power.  It handles bigger flies with less effort...and I own an H3 8 wt. that gets tons of hours throwing bass-sized poppers.

The 10 wt. throws like most 12s, but lighter in the hand than most 9s...and is butter smooth delivering 10" - 12" flies...

...and the 12 wt (which weighs within a fraction of an ounce of the 10) is for the really big stuff over 12".

A link, in case anyone is interested: https://crcustomrod.com/collections/fly/products/predatory-fly-rod-810?variant=32888795136135

 

I've owned, and fished over 20 10 wt. fly rods, many that claimed to be "the best" for musky...not one is built specifically for the task buy by a guy who actually gets out there and does it...one easy way to check: If the rod has metal guides, it won't stand up...

Sorry to go off on a tangent...it's kind of a passion of mine...

 

They sound great and the price is less than I expected, but what makes something a pike/musky rod, specifically? I am a saltwater guy, but could see crossover with gator blues and small sharks, but unclear what makes something a musky rod vs anything else. 

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Geoff Roznak
55 minutes ago, E.Young said:

 

They sound great and the price is less than I expected, but what makes something a pike/musky rod, specifically? I am a saltwater guy, but could see crossover with gator blues and small sharks, but unclear what makes something a musky rod vs anything else. 

That's a great question.  A few things; here's what pops to mind off the top of my head:

  1. Fly size.  Musky flies are big - a foot long is not unusual - and tend to be heavy when wet.  Wind resistant as well.  The rods have to have an action that's stiff enough to handle casting these things several hundred times a day.  A lot of salt water rods I've tried have actions that are too soft, IMO...even some of the rods marketed as "musky rods", like TFO's Esox rod, were too soft, IMO.
  2. 249727111_10226963743300506_2102443860736677145_n.thumb.jpg.3442d78a19806bb0efcb6ebd81c5d0ac.jpg
  3. Light weight.  We make hundreds of casts a day...call it one a minute, or so.  Tom's 8 wt. one-piece is pretty close to my Helios 3 8 wt. in overall weight, and swing weight is right there as well.
  4. Smooth power curve - I'm not sure if this is a "musky fly rod" thing, or just something that's a benefit from them being one piece rods...but it's huge.  I've owned more than 20 10 wt. rods, and the only rods that have come close are the discontinued St. Croix SOLE rods.
  5. Fighting butt - on every cast, we'll cast out 50' - 70' of line, strip all of it back into the boat, and do a figure-8 in the water if it's deep enough...which is most of the time...that fighting butt makes the figure-8 a lot easier to do.  It also aids casting, as you can set it along your fore arm to keep your cast mechanics consistent.
  6. Hardware.  Mostly ceramic line guides.  The lines we use are mostly sinking lines, tungsten is usually what's used to make them sink, tungsten is harder than steel...so the lines will eat metal guides.  This isn't a matter of "if it will happen" it's "When it will happen."  I know a few musky fly guides up here who have had rods rigged for clients last weeks before new guides were needed.

That's what I've got, without spending too much time thinking about it.

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49 minutes ago, Geoff Roznak said:

That's a great question.  A few things; here's what pops to mind off the top of my head:

  1. Fly size.  Musky flies are big - a foot long is not unusual - and tend to be heavy when wet.  Wind resistant as well.  The rods have to have an action that's stiff enough to handle casting these things several hundred times a day.  A lot of salt water rods I've tried have actions that are too soft, IMO...even some of the rods marketed as "musky rods", like TFO's Esox rod, were too soft, IMO.
  2. 249727111_10226963743300506_2102443860736677145_n.thumb.jpg.3442d78a19806bb0efcb6ebd81c5d0ac.jpg
  3. Light weight.  We make hundreds of casts a day...call it one a minute, or so.  Tom's 8 wt. one-piece is pretty close to my Helios 3 8 wt. in overall weight, and swing weight is right there as well.
  4. Smooth power curve - I'm not sure if this is a "musky fly rod" thing, or just something that's a benefit from them being one piece rods...but it's huge.  I've owned more than 20 10 wt. rods, and the only rods that have come close are the discontinued St. Croix SOLE rods.
  5. Fighting butt - on every cast, we'll cast out 50' - 70' of line, strip all of it back into the boat, and do a figure-8 in the water if it's deep enough...which is most of the time...that fighting butt makes the figure-8 a lot easier to do.  It also aids casting, as you can set it along your fore arm to keep your cast mechanics consistent.
  6. Hardware.  Mostly ceramic line guides.  The lines we use are mostly sinking lines, tungsten is usually what's used to make them sink, tungsten is harder than steel...so the lines will eat metal guides.  This isn't a matter of "if it will happen" it's "When it will happen."  I know a few musky fly guides up here who have had rods rigged for clients last weeks before new guides were needed.

That's what I've got, without spending too much time thinking about it.

 

Thanks! Very interesting and informative - just what I was looking to hear about. Some useful features in the cross-over applications, it sounds like. And yes, I will agree, a one-piece rod ALWAYS casts better. 

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Geoff Roznak
30 minutes ago, E.Young said:

I will agree, a one-piece rod ALWAYS casts better. 

Some people have trouble grasping that, and will argue the point for days...

They can be a PITA to transport, butt there's all kinds of ways around that...I had my drift boat built with rod lockers...

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My rods point get broken down at the end of the season. My storage, transport, boat, all one-piece friendly.

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Geoff Roznak
32 minutes ago, E.Young said:

My rods point get broken down at the end of the season. My storage, transport, boat, all one-piece friendly.

That's funny - same here...except my rods don't even get broken down at the end of the season.  They get cleaned, and go on the rack, ready to go.

A friend owns a fly shop, and he's always telling me I need to break down my rods.

I'll break them down if I'm traveling in some way that can't handle a full length rod, which I haven't done for three seasons.

...I did have a drift boat built with full length, covered, lockable rod lockers.  Four on a side, 8 rods total.  It bugged me that this wasn't an available option from the popular drift boat makers.

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