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sxsneubaum

Need Wood Stripping Help

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sxsneubaum

Since building our home I have left the front porch unfinished because we didn't know what we wanted to do.  We have it figured out but it is going to take some doing.  Amy's grandfather is a spry 90 year old.  He was a tailgunner on a B-17 during WW II, so he has a B-17 engine.  He owned a hardware store, Ford dealership and an IH business, so he has a ton of stuff from that.

He also has the front pillars to the hotel that was in Potomac, IL in the late 1800's to the 1950's.  

He gave us two of them for our porch.  There is absolutely no sign of rot anywhere.  They are solid made from one piece of wood, can't tell what kind.  We want to strip them down and paint them to match the trim of our house.  The problem is the paint they are covered with.  It is a real thick white paint, crusty and cracked.  

What can I use to strip that off?

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WPG Gizmo

From that time frame the paint is lead based so you need to take some precautions with it.  

You can apply stripper then scrape off as much as possible chances are this is going to be a time consuming task and messy.  

You could also find a restoration shop and have them do it for you it may be expensive but you wont have to deal with the lead paint issue.

I would stay away from using a sander it will spread the lead particles everywhere which you really dont want to happen.

Good luck with your new project :D

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Pat Berry

It completely depends on the style of the columns. Are they square, octagonal, or round? Tapered or straight? Is there a lot of trim detail?

Sounds like lead paint, which does an amazing job of protecting wood. Too bad it causes brain damage. Whatever you do to prep the columns, I'd wear a respirator, put drop cloths everywhere, and do it outside.

I'm pretty partial to using Allway scraper blades for simple stuff. A new one out of the package is as sharp as a chisel, and does a nice clean job of stripping down to the wood withouth any gougeing.

Infared paint strippers are pretty hard to beat, but you'll still need a variety of scrapers to get the paint off if you have a lot of trim detail. I use these for old doors.

And then there's a heat gun, which is fine if you don't mind fumes and are careful about not burning the wood.

Lastly, since you're going to paint it, you could always spot spot scrape, lightly sand, spot prime, and paint. If it's old, and you want it to look old, I wouldn't worry about having it look perfect-- you just want the paint to stick. My house was built in 1868, so if it were me, I'd keep it simple.

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garyRI

Can you get your hands on a pressure washer? The commercial units can go through a 2x4.

I'm a fan of pressure washing. If the paint won't come off with high pressure water why take it off? Pressure wash, let it get bone dry. With proper protective gear sand to fair/smooth the paint & repaint.

Unless someone in your family is fond of eating outside wooden trim I wouldn't worry about lead paint.

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Guest

Before you do any of the above check to see if there are any places that dip furniture for stripping in your area.  You will have to have the demensions of them ready when you call.  I had to get a quote for stripping a large dinning table a couple of years ago and I was surprised how cheap it was, $100.00.  It would save you a ton of labor and God knows what was in that paint.

Once you have the paint off you will have a lot of priming and other prep wprk to make a good job of it.

Dave

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BradSouth

I had to repaint my house this year and we had bad paint on the house and scraping would not work, so i bought a silent paint striper that thing is the BOMB you can rent one from the company it works better than any process I have tried. its all UV light and is very safe.

Check it out it works great.

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Mn John

I agree with BwanaDave, find a place that dips furniture.  In our former home we had large (4ft X 9ft) double entry doors made of oak, with a carved desgin on three panels on each door.  They were heavy, and had been painted a number of times.  We had them dipped for less than $150. No mess, no fuss, no chemicals, only a lot of heavy lifting.

Find a place that will dip them money well spent.

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