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Sniper Deer Hunt


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Is sitting in a tree stand over a pile of apples any different than sitting in a duck blind of a decoy spread?

Yes one is baiting a apples to apples comparison  :D would be spreading corn out to attrack ducks

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Of the 43 now 44 post's only two of us live in the west and one other has posted photos of western hunting.

It's a different ballgame out here. 500 yards is nothing.

Beyond that your getting into precision long range shooting.

Is it hunting or Shooting? Well if your not familiar with the wide open landscape of the west, you would say shooting.

Aproaching an Antelope or large Mule deer buck in open country takes as much skill and patience as anything else, they are called Mule deer because with those ears thay can hear you when you get out of your truck and fart. They can see you from a mile away Antelope 2 miles away.

I would venture to say that a record book Mule deer is a tougher trophy to bring to bag than a record book whitetail.

I have hunted both.

Gee I wonder how all those archers (including me) have done it :D .

Just because you dont live there doesn't means you dont hunt there.

I missed a book Muley at about 18 yards once :p

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Is sitting in a tree stand over a pile of apples any different than sitting in a duck blind of a decoy spread?

Yes one is baiting a apples to apples comparison  :D would be spreading corn out to attrack ducks

My point was that one goes to a pre-determined spot and attracts the game to them.  So if one was to say sitting in a deer stand is not hunting, then neither is sitting in a blind. It's all semantics.  For that matter, I don't hunt grouse, I walk through an area where they've been before and hope they are there again, OR my dog hunts birds and I hunt pointing dogs.

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You sure your name isn't really bubba and you live in Georgia?? :D  :D

Its not semantics.

Baiting is baiting its against the law for a reason, decoys are not illegal

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Utah Pointerman
Gee I wonder how all those archers (including me) have done it :D .

The secret society of 500 yard archers eh. :p

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Just curious Bobman, why is baiting against the law?

I would guess a multitude of reasons ranging  from disease from concentraiting animals to fair chase.

I agree with them, in the case of fair chase with deer it takes the need to scout and develop good woodsmanship skills. we all have to draw the line somewhere, thats my take.

I dont make the laws but you bait a duck pond or a dove field in Ga and you will not like what happens next :D .

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Gee I wonder how all those archers (including me) have done it :D .

The secret society of 500 yard archers eh. :p

:D I almost shot my best friend at about 300 yards when I was about 14 shooting a bow up in the air. Missed him by about a foot.

He wasn't real happy with me....

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I guess I misspoke, since baiting is not illegal here, I will have to change my wording.  Forget about the apples.  All I am saying is the word "hunting" is a misnomer in itself for most of the hunting we all do.
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PartridgeCartridge

Have you been out of Georgia in a while Bobman? Baiting is legal in many states and probably a few provinces too.

I'm not sure I catch your drift on the baiting issue.

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in his original question he compared baiting deer to decoying ducks

Is sitting in a tree stand over a pile of apples any different than sitting in a duck blind of a decoy spread?

I simply stated that its not a "apples to apples" comparison, it would have to be using bait to hunt ducks to be a correct comparison

SOOOO tell me where baiting while duck hunting is legal??

ANd yes I know baiting deer is legal in someplaces I dont like it but thats just my personal code I don't mind others doing it if its legal, its just not for me.

This will sound like I'm braggin and I'm not its just true.

I am a expert bow deer hunter have been passionate about it for most of the last 40 years, and I keep putting up artificial barriers to success on myself to keep it interesting.

I now hunt on the ground with my longbow even during gun season, definitely makes it harder, and I like that. However if I needed the meat I would not hesitate to shoot one with my rifle and I still enjoy the occasional riifle hunt and my 30-30 contender. We have a 12 deer limit( 10 does) and additional tags can be had we also have a several month long gun deer hunting season. I rarely go out and dont have the opportunity to fill a tag, I'd trade it all for a healthy quail population.

AND NO NO NO I don't get out of Georgia nearly enough :D

Although its in the high 60's and breezy here today so this time of year its not too bad.

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Almost Heaven GSP's

Right there with you on learning the animal and positioning yourself Brad. My favorite deer stand when I hunted w/ My Father and 2 Bro's was midway between 2 gates on a 3 mile stretch of gated State land, right at the top center of the ridge.  2 ridges rolled down together into a big bench, with 2 more ridges rolling back up from them and conveniently coming together at 1 of the very few breaks in the cliff lines at the rimrock, where the deer could roll up out of the main backbone. I would get all the deer rolling away from the people hunting near the gates hitting that bench and then going out the top. I have a box full of racks ranging from 16-20" wide from that stand, until an ice storm literally crushed the entire forest of 100 year old Oaks and made it virtually impossible for man or beast to travel.

Bob,

I think I'll stay away from Brad's "Long Range Wing Shooting"! I'm too much of a junky for that underfoot, heart stopping explosion of wings!

12,

I didn't take it as a direct personal attack, but was rather making the point that because I can and will shoot deer at excess range, doesn't mean I haven't shown skill in hunting, not only in this singular action, but in any other as well. For record, while you can't see them in the pix on the link to last years hunt I posted; there are 55 gallon drums positioned at each shooting lane in the strip below me with the yardage painted on them. Those lanes/drums are "coincidentally" positioned exactly where years of scouting told me the deer ALWAYS stopped to look ahead of them before breaking into the open at a run and are "coincidentally" all right on the main runway trails heading for the river crossings. No skill in locating those points at all... I just wandered around until I found where the deer tracks told me the deer would pause, stomp around and were generally not moving forward at a dead run...yet.

You know, I have seen some mighty dang good Archers up in PA that may just be Members of that 500 yard Archers Club. They could shoot 100 yard moving targets, flying game w/ Flu Flu's I think they were called and all sorts of other shots that were very hard for me to imagine as a 30 yard Archer, without having actually seen them!

All in all, just different strokes for different folks and different situations.

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  • 3 months later...

Some consideration to account for when judging long range hunters is terrain. I shot an antelope at 660. Getting this close required me to stalk and crawl. The antelope was well aware of its surrounding even this far out. There was no cover or terrain to hide me any longer, and having only that section of land available to me, left me with few options if I wanted to harvest an animal. This hunt had everything a close rage hunt had, but required a greater shooting skill.

I would even suggest that the shot was no less ethical than the majority of shots that are taken in the north woods in my home state of MN. Trying to assess a shot in heavy cover often leads to poor judgment, and wounded animals, and even illegal harvests.

Being one that consumes what I harvest, the quickness of the kill, and amount of panic in the animal effect the quality of the meat. Often times a little distance can keep the adrenaline down in the animal making it a better meal. When it comes to big game animals, I am primarily a meat hunter, and long range skill help fill my tags which is my primary concern. Last year I shot 4 antelope, 2 were taken at about 100 yard, and 1 at about 200 yards.

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calgaryrookie

I have no problem with a skilled, well-practiced hunter taking what most would consider to be "long shots". Some can do it, some can't.

I will say that in most cases you don't HAVE to. I am a western hunter and have done the sheep thing in the mountains, elk in the foothills, deer on relatively open plains. I also know guys who have done all those succesfully via archery, including pronghorn antelope on the bald prairie. So the stand that you NEED to take long shots doesn't wash. Sure it's easier, and gives you the opportunity to get more game, but if you can do mountain sheep and antelope with a bow, you can get close enough for a relatively short rifle shot.

That said, if you can competently take that 500 yard shot, go for it.

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plainsman

Taking a 950 yard shot, even with a capable gun, is not hunting. The animal cant use it's savy and waryness to it's advantage. Why not just use a night scope and bushwack them in their beds.

Anyone who shoots  (not hunting) this way and says he has never wounded and not recovered an animal must be new to it, or lying.

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