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erik meade

light a survival fire with a shotgun shell.

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bosco mctavitch

"working" from home today...so I was forced to take a break and go try it.  I dumped 5 loads of powder (Green Dot) from my regular target reloads into a small pan, covered that with a liberal application of finely minced birch bark (the best natural firestarter I know of around here) to see if it would start a fire, as opposed to simply making a brief flame...made sure there was plenty of powder exposed to any spark...and touched off a primer from point-blank range.

It most definitively did NOT work.  nothing flared, not even the powder in the pan.  The primer blew the powder and bark into quite a mess, but that's it.  Anyone that wants the video send me your email addy and you can post it here.

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sprocket
what happens if you flick your bic on it?

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bosco mctavitch
what happens if you flick your bic on it?

It lights...but if I've got a flame already I don't need the gunpowder to start a fire.

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calgaryrookie

these items travel with me when I hike in for a deer hunt, it fits in my fanny pack along with water for the day and lunch, spare ammo – I also carry a .22 pistol as mentioned above.

What's the .22 pistol for????? You are deer hunting, you have a rifle.

I'd say that list is WAY overkill.....  Mine:

1) dress for the weather and potential weather. gloves and toque in fall.

2) fire starting stuff

3) simple stuff to help with a shelter... cord, knife, maybe a space blanket. big garbage bag.

4) compass, map, mirror

All this can go into a pocket. Need to be able to last through a cold night, that's all. fishing gear, extra guns.... bahhhhh  :p   I'm not going to be there a month. I'm 5 or 10 miles off the road max. Never heard of a hunter dying of hunger or thirst in this country. It's exposure, getting shot, or bears, usually the latter in Alberta actually.

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brymoore
Sounds like too much trouble.  I'd probably just walk back to my truck and drive home versus playing Survivorman.

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nobirdshere
Dave, that is the "can do" attitude I admire. Thanks for taking the time out of your busy work day to answer this important question and conduct the required experiments. Your findings are consistent with my own hypothesis. My hat is off to you sir.

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Guest
Sounds like too much trouble.  I'd probably just walk back to my truck and drive home versus playing Survivorman.

DING!!!

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sprocket
What's the .22 pistol for????? You are deer hunting, you have a rifle.

Because the 30-30 isn't the best rabbit cartridge...if you like eating them ;)

Now I understand my pack is a lot more than most folks would carry - I know this.  Mostly it all started with one of the boys turning an ankle.  Discussion ensued - What if you couldn't walk out?  Am I staying a week and need snare wire and fish hooks?  No but I'd like to be comfortable during the over night.  A hot cup of tea would be nice.

It also fits in my day bag for hikes, ski mobiling, etc. - a small but efficient set of tools ready if I need them.

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Rex Hoppie

You can make a small stove from a tin can.  Take a pork and bean or other can and remove the bottom with a can opener (presumably the top has already been removed).  Next, with a beer can opener, punch six trianglular holes symetrically around the top edge and also the bottom edge.  Bend the bottom triangle punches down so as to act as legs.  Build a small fire and place the stove on the fire.  Cook stuff on the top.  Feed the fire by poking small twigs and sticks thru the holes.

A stove like this is easy to make and fun to mess around with when pretending you are lost and in survival mode and playing with fire.

When you are done the can will be all black and sooty so be sure to have something along to wrap it in when you pack it out with you so your clothes do not get soiled, you wouldn't want that.

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whdtt

im surprised no one answered you seriously, erik.

here's how to do it (IMO).

--empty shotgun shell (shot, wad, and powder)

--replace 1/2 powder back in the shell, and put other 1/2 under dry tinder.

If you now try to "shoot" at the tinder, it will blow it everywhere.  Won't work.

Sooo, you take a dry piece of cloth (wool works best--enough to fit in the empty shell, but not get stuck in the barrel--a little wad), and put it over the 1/2 powder charge in the shell.  Now shoot at a stump.  The primer will ignite the powder, which will cause the fabric to smolder/burn.  Pick up the fabric and lay on 1/2 powder charge in the tinder.  Presto, fire.

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Briarscratch

light_my_fire.jpg

+

F40-4429401-8200bg_2.jpg

=

fire_01.jpg

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mshowman
Jeff, I wouldn't advise that. I burned my popcorn last week. Smelled like crap and tasted the same. I assume Fritos are the same.

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brymoore
If you want to be serious, carry some matches and some vaseline soaked cottonballs.

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Briarscratch

Actually, the problem lies more in the addictive nature of Fritos.  It's hard to start a fire after they've already been eaten.

But those things burn like a mofo.  Cereally.

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polecat
What choke size was that again.

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